The Chicago Manual Writing Style Workshop
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The Chicago Manual Writing Style Workshop as presented in Kate Turabian’s Manual for Writers Sixth Edition Part 1. Presented By: Melissa Thomas Written By: Rhonda Wilkins. Outline of Part 1. Tips on using the Turabian Manual (TM) Overview of the Turabian Manual

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Presented By: Melissa Thomas Written By: Rhonda Wilkins

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Presented by melissa thomas written by rhonda wilkins

The Chicago Manual Writing Style Workshop as presented in Kate Turabian’s Manual for Writers Sixth EditionPart 1

Presented By: Melissa Thomas

Written By: Rhonda Wilkins

Tomás Rivera Center for Student Success


Outline of part 1

Outline of Part 1

  • Tips on using the Turabian Manual (TM)

  • Overview of the Turabian Manual

  • How to Prepare the Paper Manuscript

  • Chicago Editorial Style

  • Practice Activity

Tomás Rivera Center for Student Success


Tips on how to use the tm manual

Tips on How to use the TM Manual

  • Tab pages you refer to often.

  • Use the Index. (p. 287)

  • Refer to Samples. (14.18-14.42)

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Overview of the turabian

Overview of the Turabian

  • Preface

  • Ch.1 – The Parts of the Paper

  • Ch. 2 – Abbreviations and Numbers

  • Ch. 3 – Spelling and Punctuation

  • Ch. 4 – Capitalization, Italics, and Quotation Marks

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Overview of the turabian cont

Overview of the Turabian, cont.

  • Ch.5 – Quotations

  • Ch.6 – Tables

  • Ch.7 – Illustrations

  • Ch.8 – Notes

  • Ch.9 – Bibliographies

  • Ch.10 – Parenthetical References and Reference List ** (MLA Style)

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Overview of the turabian cont1

Overview of the Turabian, cont.

  • Ch. 11 – Comparing the Two Documentation Systems

  • Ch. 12 – Public Documents

  • Ch. 13 – Preparing the Manuscript

  • Ch. 14 – Formats and Sample Layouts

  • Selected Bibliography

  • Index

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General instructions for preparing the paper manuscript

General Instructions for Preparing the Paper Manuscript

  • Paper: 8 ½ x 11 in. (13.35)

  • Typeface: 12-pt Times Roman/Courier (13.27)

  • Double Spacing (14.5)

  • Margins: 1 in. all sides (14.2-3) leave enough space on left margin to account for binding.

  • Page Numbers: upper right-hand corner (14.6-9)

  • Paragraphs and Indentation (use tab key)

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General instructions cont

General Instructions, cont.

  • Title Page (1.7, Sample, 14.18)

    • Name of the university centered near top of title page

    • Full title of paper

    • Course department and number

    • Date

    • Writer’s name

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Chicago editorial style

Chicago Editorial Style

Period (3.55-59)**

  • Use to end a complete sentence.

  • Also used in abbreviations, quotations, numbers, and references.

  • Use two spaces after a period, not one.

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Commas 3 65 83

Commas (3.65-83)

  • Use in series of three or more items.

    • The height, width, or depth

  • Use to set off nonessential clauses.

    • Switch A, which was on a panel…

  • DO NOT USE before an essential clause.

    • The rifle shot that started the battle also started the war.

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Commas cont

Commas, cont.

  • Use to separate two independent clauses joined by a conjunction.

    • Cedar shavings covered the floor, and paper was available…

  • DO NOT USE between parts of a compound predicate.

    • The results contradicted Smith’s hypothesis and indicated that the effect…

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Semicolon 3 84 88

Semicolon (3.84-88)

  • Use to separate two independent clauses that are not joined by a conjunction.

    • The participants in the first study were paid; those in the second study were unpaid.

  • Use to separate elements in a series that already contain commas.

    • The color order was red, yellow, blue; blue, yellow, red; or yellow, red, blue.

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Colon 3 88 90

Colon (3.88-90)

  • Use between a complete introductory clause and a final phrase. (If the clause following the colon is a complete sentence, it begins with a capital letter.)

    • Roosevelt spoke of four freedoms: the freedom from want, the freedom from fear …

  • Rule of thumb: If you can use the phrase “such as,” then you can use a colon.

  • DO NOT USE after an introduction that is not a complete sentence.

    • The reasons for the Great Depression include the stock market crash, the extended drought…

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Quotation marks 5 11 17

Quotation Marks (5.11-17)

  • Use with direct quotations other than block quotations.

  • Use to indicate the title of an article or chapter in a book when used in text.

  • DO NOT USE to cite a, word, phrase, letter or sentence as a linguistic example. (Instead, italicize them.)

    • He clarified the difference between farther and further.

  • DO NOT USE to introduce a technical or key term. (Instead, italicize them.)

    • The term zero-base budgeting appeared…

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Punctuation with quotation marks 5 17

Punctuation with quotation marks (5.17)

  • Periods and commas placed inside quotation marks.

  • Semicolons and colons go outside.

  • Question marks and exclamation points placed outside unless part of quotation.

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Ellipsis points 3 59 3 111 5 18 29 5 33 34

Ellipsis points (3.59, 3.111, 5.18-29, 5.33-34)

  • Use to indicate any omission of words, phrases or paragraphs in quoted material.

  • Place a space before the first dot and a space after the last.

  • Always place within quotation marks.

  • If ellipsis points precede or follow quotation marks, do not leave a space between first ellipsis dot and quotation marks.

  • Do NOT use before or after a clearly incomplete sentence.

  • Do NOT use before a block quotation or after a block quotation ending in a complete sentence.

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Parentheses 3 98

Parentheses (3.98)

  • Use to introduce abbreviations.

    • The World Health Organization (WHO)

  • Use to set off structurally independent elements.

    • The patterns were significant (see Map 5).

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Brackets 3 99

Brackets (3.99)

  • Use to enclose material inserted in a quotation by some person other than the original writer.

    • “when [his own and others’] conclusions were studied”

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Spelling 3 1 53 8 58

Spelling (3.1-53, 8.58)

  • Use spell check.

  • For reference, use Webster’s Third New International Dictionary or Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, tenth edition.

  • For further reference, use Webster’s New Biographical Dictionary or Webster’s New Geographical Dictionary.

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Capitalization 4 1 13

Capitalization (4.1-13)

  • Capitalize major words in titles and headings within body of paper.

  • Capitalize the first word after a colon or dash in a title, if a complete sentence.

  • Capitalize proper nouns and trade names.

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Capitalization in quotations 5 26

Capitalization in quotations (5.26)

  • If quotation is set off from text by comma, period, or colon, capitalize the first word, even if it is not capitalized in the original text.

    • The journalist replied, “No one can foresee the future affects.”

  • If quotation is joined with writer’s introductory words, the first word is not capitalized, even if it was capitalized in original text.

    • The committee believed that “they had done their job admirably.”

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Capitalization cont

Capitalization, cont.

  • DO NOT CAPITALIZE names of laws, theories, models, or hypotheses.

  • But retain capitalization of personal names.

    • Brady or gun control law

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Italics 4 14 33

Italics (4.14-33)

  • Use for titles of books, periodicals, and microfilm publications.

  • Use sparingly for emphasis.

  • Use to introduce a new, technical, or key term or label (only the first time.)

  • Use for letters, words, or phrases cited as a linguistic example.

    • Words such as big and little

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Abbreviations 2 1 28

Abbreviations (2.1-28)

  • Use sparingly.

  • Do not use etc., explain what you mean.

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Lists 1 2 3 57 3 89 8 4

Lists (1.2, 3.57, 3.89, 8.4)

  • Lists may be single-spaced within double-spaced text.

  • Tables, outlines, lists, and letters not immediately relevant to the text should be placed in an appendix and referred to by a footnote.

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Numbers

Numbers

  • The general rule in Chicago Style: Spell out numbers through one hundred and any whole number followed by hundred, thousand, or million.

    • The population is close to twenty million.

  • Spell out any number that begins a sentence or title.

  • Use numerals for all other numbers.

    • At least 879 people voted at the precinct.

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Numbers cont

Numbers, cont.

  • Use numerals to express all numbers expressing scientific or statistical material.

  • Except when beginning a sentence, never spell out the number preceding percent or %.

  • Use a zero before decimal point when numbers are less than 1.

    • 0.23 cm, 0.48 s

  • DO NOT USE a zero before a decimal fraction when the number cannot be greater than one (e.g. correlations, proportions, and levels of statistical significance.)

    • r(24) = -.43, p < .05

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