slide1
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Participatory Budgeting Real Money, Real Power

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 35

Participatory Budgeting Real Money, Real Power - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 107 Views
  • Uploaded on

Participatory Budgeting Real Money, Real Power. Maria Hadden, Project Coordinator, The Participatory Budgeting Project (PBP). About PBP. Founded in 2009, incorporated as nonprofit in 2011. History. Mission.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Participatory Budgeting Real Money, Real Power' - zared


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Participatory Budgeting

Real Money, Real Power

Maria Hadden, Project Coordinator,

The Participatory Budgeting Project (PBP)

about pbp
About PBP

Founded in 2009, incorporated as nonprofit in 2011

History

Mission

To empower community members to make informed, democratic, and fair decisions about public spending and revenue.

Program Areas

Public Education

Technical Assistance

Research & Evaluation

Staff

3 in New York City office, plus 3 field staff in California and Chicago

why participate in budgeting
Why participate in budgeting?

Policy without the rhetoric

Money talks, people pay attention

Public budgets are taxpayer money

slide4

A ladder of

budget participation

Full participation

Participatory budgeting

Limited participation

Citizen boards or councils

Focus groups and town halls

Consultation

Informing

Online games

Hearings and deputations

Listening

what is
What is

participatory budgeting?

A democratic process in which

community members directly decide

how to spend part of a public budget

slide6
Making real decisions about real money (NOT a consultation)

An annual cycle (NOT a one-off event)

Usually for part of a budget (NOT the whole budget)

What is

participatory budgeting?

slide7

How does it work?

How does it work?

Residents brainstorm ideas

Delegates develop proposals

Residents vote

The top projects win funding

real money real power
Real Money, Real Power

Re-inventing Democracy Through Participatory Budgeting

slide13

Where has

participatory budgeting worked?

1,500+ PB processes in the world!

Europe

Cities,

States,

Counties, Public housing, Schools,

Community organizations

North America

Asia

Africa

Latin America

Porto Alegre, Brazil

slide14

Porto Alegre, Brazil

1989

  • 1.5 million residents (50,000 participants per year)
  • Decide as much as $200 million in spending per year (20% of budget)
  • Key victories:
    • Doubled sanitation coverage
    • Doubled the number of students in schools
    • Expanded bus service to neglected areas
slide15

Participatory budgeting

in North America

Building Participation from the Bottom-Up

Targeted Outreach

Accessible Design

Grassroots Leaders

Strategic Funds

slide16

Participatory budgeting

in North America

in North America

2001:

Toronto

Community Housing

2001:

Guelph,

Ontario

2012:

Vallejo, CA

2006:

Plateau Borough,

Montreal

2009:

49th Ward, Chicago

2013:

San Francisco

2011:

New York City

slide17

Toronto Community Housing

2001

  • Second largest public housing provider in North America: 164,000 tenants
  • As many as 6,000 tenants per year have allocated up to $9 million in capital funds per year
slide18

Guelph, Ontario

2001

    • PB based in Neighbourhood Support Coalition, which includes 14 grassroots neighborhood groups and representatives of agencies, foundations, and the city.
  • ~$250,000 budget pot from city, county, province, and foundation sources
  • Neighborhood groups identify program and capital priorities, then delegates decide via consensus how to divide up funds
slide19

Chicago’s 49th Ward

2009

  • 60,000 residents, NE Chicago
  • $1.3 million (Alderman Joe Moore’s discretionary budget)
  • Funds for capital projects only
  • First PB Cycle: April 2009 – April 2010
  • Completed three cycles, for 2012-2013 cycle has expanded to 4 wards
slide20

New York City

2011

District 8, Manhattan,

Melissa Mark-Viverito (D)

$6 Million

reaching

500,000 residents

District 32, Queens,

Eric Ulrich (R)

District 39, Brooklyn,

Brad Lander (D)

District 45, Brooklyn

Jumaane Williams (D)

slide21

Who does what

Community

Decision-Makers

Organizers and Support

Council Member Offices

District

Residents

Vote on Projects

Citywide Steering Committee

Design and oversee process

Community Voices Heard

Community Engagement Lead

Budget Delegates

Develop project proposals

The Participatory Budgeting Project

Technical Assistance Lead

District Committees

Implement and manage PB locally

District Stakeholders

Propose Ideas

Research & Evaluation Team

slide22

Outcomes

1) Better Decisions

  • 2,400 residents identified 2,000 project ideas to address community needs
  • Over 300 active volunteers contributed approximately 20,000 volunteer hours to research, revise and develop 78 full project proposals
  • 6,000 voters chose top projects
slide23

Outcomes

2) Stronger Communities

More community participation - especially by underrepresented groups

  • 2,000 assembly participants: 94% spoke, 63% had household income less than Area Median Income, 64% people of color, 64% women

More community networks and collaboration

  • Over 350 organizations engaged in discussions about community improvements
  • Over 100 organizations collaborating on District and City-Wide Committees
slide24

Outcomes

3) More Public Support

  • 92% said assemblies were good or great
  • 90% said voting process was good or great
  • 94% increase in media coverage for participating Council Members
slide25

New York City

2012 - 2013

District 8: Melissa Mark-Viverito (D)

District 19:

Dan Halloran (R)

District 33:

Stephen Levin (D)

District 23:

Mark Weprin (D)

$9.4 million reaching1.3 million residents

District 39:

Brad Lander (D)

District 44:

David Greenfield (D)

District 32:

Eric Ulrich (R)

District 45:

Jumaane Williams (D)

slide26

Vallejo, California

2012

  • 117,000 residents
  • First citywide PB process in US
  • $3.2 million (sales tax revenue)
  • $200,000 allocated for implementation of process
  • Funds for capital projects and programs & services
  • 20-member Steering Committee designed and governs process
slide27

Why

participatory

budgeting?

slide35

For more info

Website: http://www.participatorybudgeting.org

Twitter: @PBProject

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ParticipatoryBudgetingProject

Maria Hadden, Project Coordinator:

Email: [email protected]

ad