The original speech
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 23

The original speech PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 104 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

The original speech . Poetry versus Prose . Hedges: This was no man. Does a man have teeth the size of axe blades? Or ears like terrible tombstones? By tampering with nature, forcing vegetables to swell far beyond their natural size, we have brought a terrible judgement on ourselves. .

Download Presentation

The original speech

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


The original speech

The original speech

Poetry versus Prose


The original speech

Hedges:

This was no man. Does a man have teeth the size of axe blades? Or ears like terrible tombstones? By tampering with nature, forcing vegetables to swell far beyond their natural size, we have brought a terrible judgement on ourselves.


The original speech

To rewrite the speech in poetry it would look like this...


The original speech

Hedges:

This was no man. Does a man have teeth

The size of axe blades? Or ears like terrible tombstones? By tampering with nature, forcing vegetables to swell Far beyond their natural size, we have brought

A terrible judgement on ourselves.


The original speech

People write in sentences and speak in thoughts:

If the speech was broken down into parcels of sense or thoughts, it would probably look more like this...


The original speech

Hedges:

This was no man.

Does a man have teeth the size of axe blades?

Or ears like terrible tombstones?

By tampering with nature,

forcing vegetables to swell far beyond their natural size, we have brought a terrible judgement on ourselves.


What shakespeare means to us

What Shakespeare Means to US

  • “To be, or not to be – that is the question...”

  • “All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players...”

  • “A horse! A horse! My kingdom for a horse...”


Why you can t just translate

Why you can’t just Translate...

“To be, or not to be?”

vs.

“Shall I live, or shall I kill myself?”


Lost in translation

Lost in Translation

“The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak”

Could translate as...

“The whiskey is great, but the steak is terrible”


Prose versus poetry

Prose Versus Poetry

  • Prose – writing which reflects the rhythm of everyday English speech. Doesn’t have rhythmical units and no structured number of syllables per line

  • Blank Verse – which has a metric structure but doesn’t rhyme (e.g. Iambic pentameter)

  • Rhyming Verse – as above, but which a rhyming scheme

  • Sonnet – a verse consisting of 14 lines of iambic pentameter. Rhyme scheme of ababcdcdefefgg.

  • Song


Iambic pentameter

Iambic Pentameter

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?

Shall I com-pare thee to a sum-mer’sday?

x / x / x / x / x /

10 pairs of syllables, one weak, one stressed which creates a steady rhythm

De-DUM, De-DUM, De-DUM, De-DUM, De-DUM,


Prose versus poetry1

Prose Versus Poetry

HAMLET

To be, or not to be – that is the question;

Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer

The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune

Or to take arms against a sea of troubles

And by opposing end them


Prose

Prose

BENEDICK

This can be no trick. The conference was sadly borne. They have the truth of it from Hero. They seem to pity the lady; it seems her affections have their full bent. Love me?


Benedick in blank verse

Benedick in Blank Verse

BENEDICK

This can be no trick. The conference was

Sadly borne. They have the truth of it from

Hero. They seem to pity the lady;

It seems her affections have their full bent.

Love me?


The original speech

Where are the full stops?

  • PUCK

  • The king doth keep his revels here to-night.Take heed the queen come not within his sight;For Oberon is passing fell and wrath,Because that she as her attendant hathA lovely boy, stolen from an Indian king.She never had so sweet a changeling;And jealous Oberon would have the childKnight of his train, to trace the forests wild.But she perforce withholds the loved boy,Crowns him with flowers and makes him all her joy.


Where are the full stops

Where are the full stops?

MACBETH

If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere wellIt were done quickly. If the assassinationCould trammel up the consequence, and catchWith his surcease success - that but this blowMight be the be-all and the end-all! - here,But here, upon this bank and shoal of time,We'd jump the life to come. But in these casesWe still have judgment here; that we but teachBloody instructions, which, being taught, returnTo plague the inventor. This even-handed justiceCommends the ingredients of our poison'd chaliceTo our own lips. He's here in double trust...


The original speech

  • PUCK

  • The king doth keep his revels here to-night.Take heed the queen come not within his sight;For Oberon is passing fell and wrath,Because that she as her attendant hathA lovely boy, stolen from an Indian king.She never had so sweet a changeling;And jealous Oberon would have the childKnight of his train, to trace the forests wild.But she perforce withholds the loved boy,Crowns him with flowers and makes him all her joy.

MACBETH

If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere wellIt were done quickly. If the assassinationCould trammel up the consequence, and catchWith his surcease success - that but this blowMight be the be-all and the end-all! - here,But here, upon this bank and shoal of time,We'd jump the life to come. But in these casesWe still have judgment here; that we but teachBloody instructions, which, being taught, returnTo plague the inventor. This even-handed justiceCommends the ingredients of our poison'd chaliceTo our own lips. He's here in double trust...


The original speech

MACBETH

If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twerewell

It were done quickly. If the assassination

Could trammel up the consequence, and catch

With his surcease success - that but this blow

Might be the be-all and the end-all! - here,

But here, upon this bank and shoal of time,

We'd jump the life to come. But in these cases

We still have judgment here; that we but teach

Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return

To plague the inventor. This even-handed justice

Commends the ingredients of our poison'dchalice

To our own lips. He's here in double trust...


The original speech

Line

Syllable

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

12

11

10

9

8

7


The original speech

Line

Syllable

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13

12

11

10

9

8

7


Shared lines and pauses

Shared lines and Pauses

MACBETH

Hath he asked for me?

LADY

Know you not he has?


Shared lines and pauses1

Shared Lines and Pauses

MACBETH

Thou canst not say I did it; never shake

Thy gory locks at me.

ROSS

Gentlemen, rise. His highness is not well


Shakespeare detectives what to look for

Shakespeare Detectives, what to look for:

  • Look at the extract: does it have a rhyme scheme? Does each line begin with a capital letter? Or are the words closer to natural speech? (Verse, Blank Verse or Prose)

  • Does the extract change between any of the above? If so, what could that mean is happening to the characters?

  • Is there a regular, structured rhythm like iambic pentameter or does it jump all over the place? If it does, what does this say about the characters’ state of mind?

  • Do the syllables add up to 10 between shared lines or should they be left as pauses?

  • Are there any words you don’t recognise? Can you work out the meaning from the rest of the line or do you have to look it up?

  • Is the speech complicated or simple? Are there midline endings, shared or short lines of meter?

  • If there are mid-line endings, what kind of emotions might be making the characters interrupt themselves?

  • If there are shared lines of metre, what does that say about the characters’ relationships?

  • If there are short lines of metre, what might the character be doing or saying in the gap?

  • Do the characters use thou/you to each other? Do they switch? If so, why?


  • Login