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CARI COM. Seminar on the Implementation of the System of National Accounts 2008 (SNA 2008) 14-16 June 2010, Jolly Beach, Resort, Antigua and Barbuda. CARI COM. CARICOM REGIONAL ENERGY INFORMATION FORUM Devon O. Niel Gardner, Ph.D. 9 December 2013 Courtleigh Hotel & Suites, Kingston, Jamaica.

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CARICOM

Seminar on the Implementation of the System of National Accounts 2008 (SNA 2008)14-16 June 2010,Jolly Beach, Resort,Antigua and Barbuda


CARICOM

CARICOM REGIONAL ENERGY INFORMATION FORUMDevon O. Niel Gardner, Ph.D.9 December 2013Courtleigh Hotel & Suites, Kingston, Jamaica


Content of presentation

CARICOM

CONTENT OF PRESENTATION

  • Background & Context

  • Energy Statistics

  • Energy Modelling

  • Energy Planning

  • Discussions


Content of presentation1

CARICOM

CONTENT OF PRESENTATION

  • Background & Context

  • Energy Statistics

  • Energy Modelling

  • Energy Planning

  • Discussions


Various paths of energy from source to service lines indicate possible energy pathways

KEY TO FIGURE

PRIMARY ENERGY SOURCE

Fossil Fuels

Bioenergy

Geothermal Energy

Solar Energy

Wind Energy

Hydro Energy

Ocean Energy

ENERGY CARRIER

Liquid Fuel

Solid Fuel

Gaseous Fuel

Electricity

CONVERSION TYPE

Thermal Conversion

Kinetic Conversion

USEABLE ENERGY FLOW

Work

Heat

ENERGY SERVICES

Heat‑based

Energy Services

Direct Heating & Lighting Services

Electrical Energy Services

Mechanical Energy Services

Various paths of energy from source to service; lines indicate possible energy pathways.


Integrated Assessment Models

e.g. AIM

Climate Models

Economic Models

e.g. GEMINI-E3, E3MG

Energy System Models

e.g. MARKAL, MESSAGE, LEAP

Engineering Models

e.g. RETScreen, eQuest


Fitting the puzzle…

Energy Security

Sociopolitics

Policy Framework

Outputs from Macros & Demand Models

Statistics

Constraints

Reports

Assumptions

Resources

Demand Projections

Expert Knowledge

Energy System Model

Other system models

Local statistics

Technology Database

Experts

Energy & Emissions

Stakeholders Meetings

Scenario

Global statistics

Policy

Literature

Reference


Background context

CARICOM

BACKGROUND & CONTEXT

What are the questions to be answered?

  • Who is consuming energy?

  • Who is producing energy?

  • Who imports and exports energy commodities?

  • What are the characteristics of transactions between energy producers and consumers?

  • ENERGY STATISTICS

  • ENERGY MODELLING

  • ENERGY PLANNING


Content of presentation2

CARICOM

CONTENT OF PRESENTATION

  • Background & Context

  • Energy Statistics

  • Energy Modelling

  • Energy Planning

  • Discussions


Energy statistics

CARICOM

ENERGY STATISTICS

  • Energy statistics refers to collection, compilation, analysis and dissemination of data on traditional primary energy commodities (such as coal, crude oil, natural gas); primary renewable sources (such as biomass, geothermal, wind, solar); and electricity when used for the production of energy.

  • Energy statistics is more specific than (and is different from) other fields of economic statistics as energy commodities can undergo far greater number of transformations (flows) than other economic commodities; in these transformations energy is conserved, as defined by and within the limitations of the first and second laws of thermodynamics.


Some Important Data

  • Global Fossil Fuel Trends: Historical, current and projected data on the production, distribution and supply of fossil fuels.

  • Global Renewable Energy Trends: Historical, current and projected data on renewable energy use.

  • Fuel Imports: Oil, gas, coal, biomass and any other fuel imports.

  • Petroleum Refining: Fuel production data, to include the variety of petroleum fuels and derivatives produced.

  • Biofuel Production: Biofuel production data, to include sources of small an large scale biomass, liquid biofuel and biogas supply.

  • Electricity Profile: Generation, transmission and distribution, and where possible, end-use data – electricity importation is also important, where applicable. Information should be disaggregated to include: renewable and non-renewable electricity generation; load factor for various generation sources; peak and off-peak electricity consumption; etc.

  • Heat Production: Any production of process heat for industrial, commercial or domestic use should be tracked.


Some Important Data

  • Commercial and Industrial Energy Consumption: Commercial and industrial activities and the associated electricity and liquid fuel consumption.

  • Self-generation and Generation-offset Distribution: Capture the penetration of small distributed generation technologies, such as solar PV panels, and generation-offset systems, such as solar water heaters.

  • Social and Demographic Surveys: Household sample surveys may capture domestic energy demand as well as make semi-quantitative determination of consumer behaviour.

  • Motor Vehicle Imports: Number and type of vehicles imported.

  • Transportation Trends: Movement of people and goods within the country, to include mode of transportation, as well as peak and off-peak trends.

  • Other Relevant Information: Renewable Energy Assessments; Technology Roadmap; Land-use Use and Spatial Interaction Plans; Industrial Plans.


Energy statistics1

CARICOM

ENERGY STATISTICS

Table: Some Key Energy Information Systems


Siee sien
SIEE/SIEN

  • The OLADE Energy Information Systems (SIEE and SIEN) are modern computing platforms, developed with funding from IADB, which integrates and manages statistics, prospective energy, socio-economic, legal information, supply and demand for services and document the energy sector in the Member Countries of standardized and easy distribution. The tool optimizes and facilitate the provision of information to the Member Countries of OLADE.

  • The computing platform is intuitive and can be configured so as to have member countries organize energy information; the tool allows member states to set up, organize, manage and disseminate information in their respective energy sectors to the regional (CARICOM) level.


Siee sien1
SIEE/SIEN

  • Integrates information from the energy chain by establishing uniform criteria for standardization, which significantly improves reliability of the results.

  • Presents historical data for major variables in the energy sector, from which behaviour trends can be identified and future behaviour predicted.

  • Optimize the timing and periodicity for energy information reported by the country.

  • Contains flags that combines economic and energy information analysis.

  • Integrates with other platforms.


Cippet cipore
CIPPET/CIPORE

  • The Caribbean Energy Information System (CEIS) was established to provide a regional information service through networks in Caribbean, mostly CARICOM, countries.

  • The “network” operates through 18 National Focal Points (NFPs) identified by governments. Each NFP co-ordinates a local committee that identifies, collects and disseminates information on the national energy sector; they also provide feedback to the CEIS on the network’s activities.

  • Data is uploaded into the CIPPET/CIPORE database from the CEIS Secretariat. 


Cippet cipore1
CIPPET/CIPORE

  • CEIS has a wealth of historical data on energy related matters on the Caribbean.

  • The CEIS network within CARICOM is fairly strong; this will no doubt allow for “back-stopping” the data collection effort within member states.

  • There is potential for the CEIS databases to link with other information systems, as well as planning tools.


Content of presentation3

CARICOM

CONTENT OF PRESENTATION

  • Background & Context

  • Energy Statistics

  • Energy Modelling

  • Energy Planning

  • Discussions


Energy modelling

CARICOM

ENERGY MODELLING

  • Energy models are being increasingly used to provide insights into how  energy systems may evolve in the years ahead.

  • The formulation of policy and  strategy requires sound indications of what to expect in the long-term. It also  benefits from a greater transparency of how key elements of the complex energy  system influence energy demand and supply trends – macroeconomic trends,  demographics, energy prices, resource availability, policy and regulatory  developments, technology, etc. Understanding the analysis, scenarios and results of the model would enhance regional, national and local energy planning.


Energy modelling1

CARICOM

ENERGY MODELLING

Table: Some Key Energy Modelling Tools


GLOBAL USAGE OF MARKAL/TIMES

Contracting Parties

Other users



Energy modelling2

CARICOM

ENERGY MODELLING

DESIRED CHARACTERISTICS OF ENERGY MODELLING TOOLS:

  • Robust

  • Navigation & Usability

  • Internet Integration

  • Flexibility

  • Functionality

  • Data exportability

  • Integration with other applications

  • Customizability

  • Speed

  • Technical support & capacity building

  • Cost


Content of presentation4

CARICOM

CONTENT OF PRESENTATION

  • Background & Context

  • Energy Statistics

  • Energy Modelling

  • Energy Planning

  • Discussions


Energy planning

CARICOM

ENERGY PLANNING


Content of presentation5

CARICOM

CONTENT OF PRESENTATION

  • Background & Context

  • Energy Statistics

  • Energy Modelling

  • Energy Planning

  • Discussions


Discussions

CARICOM

DISCUSSIONS

  • Modern energy systems are characterized by increasingly complex interactions between energy supplier and distributor, and end-user.

  • Quality data and tools are desired

  • Machine-accessible data has the potential to greatly enhance the productivity of modellers


Discussions1

CARICOM

DISCUSSIONS

Key conditions:

  • Models must be available and appropriate for the environment

  • Suitable data must be available for input into the model and for validating results

  • Models should be operated by persons trained in use of the tools and in interpreting the outcomes for local conditions


CARICOM

“For the things we have to learn before we can do them, we learn by doing them.” ‑Aristotle


CARICOM

THANKS

for your attention!


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