The Smart Grid
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 15

The Smart Grid and Optimizing Electricity Supply PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 110 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

The Smart Grid and Optimizing Electricity Supply. Atlantic Council Workshop Steve Bossart Director, Integrated Electric Power Systems October 26, 2009. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. What’s different with the Smart Grid?.

Download Presentation

The Smart Grid and Optimizing Electricity Supply

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


The smart grid and optimizing electricity supply

The Smart Grid and Optimizing Electricity Supply

Atlantic Council Workshop

Steve Bossart

Director, Integrated Electric Power Systems

October 26, 2009

Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability


What s different with the smart grid

What’s different with the Smart Grid?

…for all stakeholders

  • Decentralized supply and control

  • Two way power flow

  • Two way information flow

    Creating the intelligence and capability to optimize:

    • Reliability

    • Security

    • Economics

    • Efficiency

    • Environment

    • Safety

Updated 02/25/2008


The smart grid will optimize supply

The Smart Grid will Optimize Supply

25 M residential solar

1 M PHEV/PEV

10 M PHEV/PEV

50 M PHEV/PEV

Demand Response

Conservation

2 M architectural wind

5 M building solar

500 wind parks

50 solar parks

5,000 distributed wind

5,000 utility solar

100,000 Buildings as PP


Smart grid characteristics

Smart Grid Characteristics

…supporting the optimization of supply

The Smart Grid is “transactive” and will:

Enable active participation by consumers

Accommodate all generation and storage options

Enable new products, services, and markets

Provide power quality for the digital economy

Optimize asset utilization and operate efficiently

Anticipate & respond to system disturbances (self-heal)

Operate resiliently against attack and natural disaster

Updated 02/25/2008


Achieving supply optimization goals

Achieving Supply Optimization Goals

The Smart Grid will support their achievement by:

  • Energy independence

    • Deep penetration of electric vehicles –Smart Grid enabled – couldreduce oil imports by 52%

    • Smart Grid supports conservation, demand response, and reduces T&D losses further reducing peak loads and total US electricity consumption by 56 to 203B KWh’s by 2030 

  • National security

    • Smart Grid increases the decentralization of supply, greatly reducing its vulnerability to attack

    • 2-way flow of power and information enables the grid to anticipate and respond to problems (self-heals) dramatically reducing the impact and duration of disturbances.

Updated 02/25/2008


Achieving supply optimization goals1

Achieving Supply Optimization Goals

The Smart Grid will support their achievement by:

  • Low carbon supply

    • Deep penetration of electric vehicles –Smart Grid enabled – couldreduce CO2 emissions by 60 to 211 Million metric tons in 2030

    • New storage technologies—including EV’s— will enable a much deeper penetration of  intermittent renewables. 

    • Smart Grid will reduce T&D losses thereby reducing the amount of generation needed to serve a given load.

  • Growing the US economy

    • New jobs—280K new, 140K sustained— to support the planning, design, construction, operation and maintenance of the Smart Grid

    • Economic development for new products and services demanded by Smart Grid consumers

Updated 02/25/2008


How do we get there

How do we get there?


Some challenges

Some Challenges

Technology

Interoperability and cyber security standards

Regulatory Policy

Workforce training and education

Consumer engagement (the market)

Updated 02/25/2008


Consumer value proposition

Consumer Value Proposition

Answers “What‘s in it for me?”

Benefits

  • More reliable service

  • Reduced business losses and prices for goods & services

  • Potential bill savings

  • Transportation cost savings (PHEVs vs. conventional vehicles)

  • Information, control, and options for managing electricity

  • Option to sell consumer-owned generation and storage resources into the market

    Costs

  • Passed on to the consumer

Updated 02/25/2008


An example

Estimated residential bill/year

$1200

Expected reduction from EE/DR

10%

15%

$180

$120

Potential savings/year

$120

Assumed bill increase to pay for smart grid/year

$60

Net consumer value/year

$0

$120

An Example

Potential Bill Savings

Positive value but not very compelling!

Updated 02/25/2008


Another example

Another Example

Potential Fuel Cost Savings

More compelling but is it enough?

Updated 02/25/2008


Societal value proposition

Societal Value Proposition

Answers “What‘s in it for us?” – high value expected!

Benefits

  • Opportunity for energy independence through integration of electric vehicles as generation and storage devices

  • Increased grid robustness improving grid security

  • Reduced emissions through integration of renewable generation and reduced losses

  • New jobs and growth in GDP

  • Downward pressure on electricity prices through improved operating and market efficiencies, consumer involvement, deferral of capital projects

  • Improved reliability leading to reduction in consumer losses (~$135B)

    Costs

  • No incremental costs

Updated 02/25/2008


Impact of smart grid on demand generation

Impact of Smart Grid on Demand & Generation

  • Reduce overall demand due to:

    • Demand response, conservation and reduced T&D losses

  • Reduce peak demand due to:

    • Demand response, DER and storage

  • Increase demand due to:

    • Electric vehicles

  • Smart Grid provides market access for all generation sources

    • Centralized generation (coal, nuclear, hydro)

    • Distributed generation (renewables)

Updated 02/25/2008


Summary

Summary

Electric vehicles may drive consumer engagement in Smart Grid

  • Help the consumer “get on board”

  • Develop the complete story

    • consumer benefits

    • societal benefits

    • costs of doing nothing

    • address their concerns

    • answer their questions

  • Electric vehicles and free markets may be the catalyst for both the Smart Grid and the optimization of supply

Updated 02/25/2008


For more information

For More Information

For additional Information:

http://www.netl.doe.gov/moderngrid

15


  • Login