“Research without any underlying theoretical reasoning is simply a string of meaningless bits of i...
Download
1 / 9

Research without any underlying theoretical reasoning is simply a string of meaningless bits of information Mills, 1959 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 200 Views
  • Uploaded on

“Research without any underlying theoretical reasoning is simply a string of meaningless bits of information (Mills, 1959); theory without research is abstract and speculative” (Newman, 1999). Theory Empirical Hypothesis generalizations Research (data collection).

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Research without any underlying theoretical reasoning is simply a string of meaningless bits of information Mills, 1959' - zahavah


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Slide1 l.jpg

“Research without any underlying theoretical reasoning is simply a string of meaningless bits of information (Mills, 1959); theory without research is abstract and speculative” (Newman, 1999).


Slide2 l.jpg

Theory simply a string of meaningless bits of information (Mills, 1959); theory without research is abstract and speculative” (Newman, 1999).

Empirical Hypothesis

generalizations

Research

(data collection)


Slide3 l.jpg

Functions of Theories (Macro & Micro): simply a string of meaningless bits of information (Mills, 1959); theory without research is abstract and speculative” (Newman, 1999).

  • Accumulation: Theories helps us accumulate and organize research findings. A theoretical framework can help select and arrange research findings in ways that are meaningful and helpful for improving our overall understanding.

  • Guidance: Theories guide researchers in developing and testing hypothesis. Empirical research can be designed in an effort to support or refute a specific theory.

  • Connectedness: Theories help us see how ideas are connected. The conceptual elements, or sets of ideas within a theory, also allow us to see distinctions and commonalities of different theories.

    (Family Theories, Klein & White 1996)


Slide4 l.jpg

Functions of Theories (Macro & Micro): simply a string of meaningless bits of information (Mills, 1959); theory without research is abstract and speculative” (Newman, 1999).

  • Interpretation: Theories help make sense of the mechanisms by which certain phenomena operate.

  • Prediction: Theories should be useful for predicting future outcomes found in our research. Knowing what a theory predicts can contribute to guiding our research toward confirming or invalidating the prediction. Even if predictions are not confirmed, however, it may be the conditions under which the theory operates that need to be adjusted, rather than discarding the theory itself.

  • Explanation: Theories provide possible answers to “why” and “how” questions.

    (Family Theories, Klein & White 1996)


Slide5 l.jpg

Structural-Functionalism Theory simply a string of meaningless bits of information (Mills, 1959); theory without research is abstract and speculative” (Newman, 1999).

This perspective views society as a social organism. In order for this organism to survive, institutions within society must function in ways that promote the overall good of society. Therefore, the institution of the family exists to perform certain functions that will ensuring the survival of society.

The structure of the family is seen as an important component of its ability to perform necessary social functions.

Structural-Functionalism is concerned with:

  • The role of family within larger society

  • The role of individual family members within the family unit


Slide6 l.jpg

Functions of the family: simply a string of meaningless bits of information (Mills, 1959); theory without research is abstract and speculative” (Newman, 1999).

  • Regulation of sexual behavior through marriage

  • Control and regulation of the reproduction of children

  • Socialization of individuals

  • Economic cooperation

  • (Companionship and emotional support)

    These functions were thought to be best accomplished when members share similar values and when specific roles are held within the family:

  • Men – instrumental

  • Women – expressive


Slide7 l.jpg

Social Exchange Theory simply a string of meaningless bits of information (Mills, 1959); theory without research is abstract and speculative” (Newman, 1999).

This perspective views social interaction as the exchange of resources. Things that people need and want are obtained through exchanges with others. People will seek to get these things at the lowest possible cost (based on economic theory).

Assumptions of Exchange Theory:

  • People are primarily motivated by self-interest

  • People seek to maximize rewards and minimize costs

  • People are rational beings

  • Social relationships are characterized by interdependence

  • Exchange is regulated by norms of reciprocity


Slide8 l.jpg

Conflict Theory simply a string of meaningless bits of information (Mills, 1959); theory without research is abstract and speculative” (Newman, 1999).

This perspective views society in terms of conflict and struggle, rather than stability and harmony. This perspective focuses on social inequality and power differentials. Who is benefiting from a specific social arrangement?

Assumptions of Conflict theory:

  • Humans are in competition for scarce resources

  • Social structure and social inequality influence family dynamics

  • Families can be studied with respect to their access to scarce resources and how they manage inequality and discrimination

  • Negotiation of conflict can produce new values or reinforce existing norms; conflict is seen as the root of progress and change


Slide9 l.jpg

Symbolic Interaction Theory simply a string of meaningless bits of information (Mills, 1959); theory without research is abstract and speculative” (Newman, 1999).

This perspective focuses on the way that meanings are constructed through social interaction. Through interaction and negotiation, individuals interpret the behaviors of others and assign meanings to the world around us.

Assumptions of Symbolic Interaction

  • People will react to something based on the meaning that thing has for them

  • We learn about and interpret the world around us and through day-today interactions

  • Experiences in social interaction serve as a guide for future behavior

  • Social interaction and behavior is shaped by social roles

  • Interactions take place within a social structure that influences the shape of these interactions


ad