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RET in the Classroom. Seth Baker RET Teaching Modules June 19, 2007. Dr. Andreas Linninger, RET coordinator. Goals of the Teaching Modules. Learn the structures and functions of the human brain. Conduct a comparative study of different animal brains.

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RET in the Classroom

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Ret in the classroom

RET in the Classroom

Seth Baker

RET Teaching Modules

June 19, 2007

Dr. Andreas Linninger, RET coordinator


Goals of the teaching modules

Goals of the Teaching Modules

  • Learn the structures and functions of the human brain.

  • Conduct a comparative study of different animal brains.

  • Create a brain model of an imaginary animal.

  • Develop communication skills and electronic slideshow to share scientific knowledge and understanding.


Alignment with illinois state learning goals

Alignment with Illinois State Learning Goals

  • 12.A.3c. Compare and contrast how different forms and structures reflect different functions.

  • 12.B.3b. Compare and assess features of organisms for their adaptive, competitive and survival potential.

  • 11.B.3c. Select the most appropriate design and build a prototype or simulation.

  • 5.C.3b. Prepare and orally present original work supported by research.

  • 5.C.3c. Take notes, conduct interviews, organize and report information in oral, visual and electronic formats.


Alignment with district 97 curriculum

Alignment with District 97 Curriculum

  • The Comparative Brain Study and Model Design unit enriches the 6th grade life science curriculum.

  • The electronic slideshow supports the 6th grade language arts curriculum.


Comparative brain study and brain model design

Comparative Brain Study and Brain Model Design

Learn the structures and functions of the human brain.

Conduct a comparative study of animal brains.

Create a brain model of an imaginary animal.


Brain knowledge

Brain Knowledge

  • Learn the structures and functions of the human brain.

  • Students will study the major regions of the brain and the lobes of the cortex.

  • Students will use a science textbook, laboratory materials and human brain models.

  • Transition into next unit goal - Do you think all animals have these same structures?


Comparative brain study

Comparative Brain Study

  • Conduct a comparative study of animal brains.

  • Students will use a web site, a fetal pig specimen and human brain models. Students will complete a comparative chart investigating qualities such as the overall brain size, cortical complexity, frontal cortex size, cerebellum size and olfactory bulb size.

  • Students will also analyze the proportion of brain mass to body mass.

Human

Raccoon

Baboon

Squirrel

Rabbit

Frog


Comparative brain chart

Comparative Brain Chart


Brain model design

Brain Model Design

  • Create a brain model of an imaginary animal.

    In cooperative groups, students will:

  • Determine animal characteristics (behaviors, mobility, senses, environment, survival adaptations).

  • Draw a map of the imaginary animal’s brain.

  • Use colored modeling playdough to build a model of the imaginary animal’s brain.


Brain model construction

Brain Model Construction

  • Students first designed brain model based on the unique characteristics of their imaginary animal.

  • Using colored playdough, students constructed their models.


Assessment

Assessment

Student were assessed on the following criteria:

  • Accuracy and details of the brain model

  • Creativity of the model design

  • Inclusion of each brain region

    Grading rubrics were used to formally assess students.


Grading rubric for brain model

Grading Rubric for Brain Model

(modified from Demetrikopoulos 2006)


Science research presentations

Science Research Presentations

  • Research a disease or medical condition related to a specific human body system.

  • Write a research paper on the specific disease or medical condition.

  • Create and present an electronic slideshow demonstrating knowledge and understanding of research topic.


Research topics

Research Topics

  • Research a disease or medical condition related to a specific human body system.

  • Topics were based on the following human body systems covered as part of the 6th grade science curriculum:

  • NervousSkeletal

  • Endocrine Reproductive

  • Muscular

  • Students researched issues including causes, symptoms, diagnosis, traditional and alternative treatments, history and the effect on society.


Slideshow guidelines

Slideshow Guidelines

  • Create and present an electronic slideshow demonstrating knowledge and understanding of research topic.

  • In class training on the use of powerpoint or keynote.

  • Guidelines for slideshow based on Michael Alley’s The Craft of Scientific Presentations.

  • A grading rubric was used to formally assess the scientific content, design of slideshow and quality of the presentation.


Powerpoint presentations

Powerpoint Presentations

  • Each student presented a 5 minute slideshow based on research topic.

  • Students presented on topics such as Alzheimer’s and Schizophrenia.


Grading rubric for electronic slideshow presentation

Grading Rubric for Electronic Slideshow Presentation


Resources

Resources

Demetrikopoulos, Melissa K et al. “Build-a-Brain Project”. Science Scope. 2006 vol29, 28-31.

www.cbn-atl.org/education/braininfo.pdf

www.serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/kinser/Fine1.html

staff.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html


Acknowledgments

Acknowledgments

  • The National Science Foundation for their continued financial support of the RET summer program and materials for classroom teaching modules NSF EEC-0502272 Grant

  • Dr. Andreas Linninger and the staff at the LLPD. The University of Illinois-Chicago.

  • Dr. Victoria Sharts


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