Leadership Development 101

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Overview. Principles of OrganizingWhy think about leadership?The Leadership Ladder and other tools and tipsDelegationQuestions. Saul Alinsky's Principles of Organizing. 1. Make concrete improvements in people's lives2. Give people a sense of their own power3. Change the balance of power. Why

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Leadership Development 101

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1. Leadership Development 101 Ensuring Your Campaign Outlasts YOU!

2. Overview Principles of Organizing Why think about leadership? The Leadership Ladder and other tools and tips Delegation Questions

3. Saul Alinsky’s Principles of Organizing 1. Make concrete improvements in people’s lives 2. Give people a sense of their own power 3. Change the balance of power Saul Alinsky is often referred to as “the father of community organizing” – his book Rules for Radicals is a great primer and highly recommended! Note: #s 2-3 speak directly to leadership – by developing leaders on campus we’re giving people confidence that they can make change and thus a sense of their own power in society and it is this feeling and confidence that inspires them to challenge the status quo power holders on campus and in our communitiesSaul Alinsky is often referred to as “the father of community organizing” – his book Rules for Radicals is a great primer and highly recommended! Note: #s 2-3 speak directly to leadership – by developing leaders on campus we’re giving people confidence that they can make change and thus a sense of their own power in society and it is this feeling and confidence that inspires them to challenge the status quo power holders on campus and in our communities

4. Why Should We Think About Leadership Development Avoid burnout Accomplish more Delegation = Retention Today’s campus leaders are tomorrow’s agents of change in business, family, and community Power in numbers To give people a sense of their own power

5. What is Leadership? Club officers Committee heads Sub-committee heads Dorm captains Tabling chair Student Government Rep Event coordinator

6. Leadership Ladder

7. Recruitment

8. Showing Up

9. Taking on Responsibility

10. Chairs

11. Officers

12. Mentors

13. Movin’ on Up – The AIIT Cycle

14. Ask

15. Inform

16. Involve

17. Thank

18. Leadership Dev Example: The Interested Freshman The Situation: You met a freshman in one of your classes who has shown interest in the issue of global warming. She says she’s concerned about the issue, but doesn’t know what she can do about it. Brainstorm – what are the first few steps you take to engage her?Brainstorm – what are the first few steps you take to engage her?

19. Examples of how it works Ask her why she’s interested in the issue, where she learned about it Ask her to come to the next event Ask her to take the lead on the next project and involve her in the leadership and planning of the group Ask her to run for office for the next year Inform her about how global warming affects our generation the most and the power of students to reduce the global warming impact of the university At the end of the year, inform her about club elections and vacancies for office At the event, involve her by asking her to help with a specific task for the next event or meeting Thank her for stepping up You just elected a sophomore who can now effectively help lead the group! Thank her for agreeing to do the task Thank her after the task is completed

20. Some Principles to Stick To Plan ahead Know who's graduating, who's studying abroad, who's on the verge of getting burnt out, and who's got skills and could take on a larger role. Build personal connections Phone contact is better than email, face-to-face interactions are better than phone contact. You have to know people well in order to trust that they'll do a good job—too many leaders don't trust others enough to share responsibilities. Follow-up Quickly: Once you’ve made the connection, follow up quickly and get them involved. Build your organization and leadership through campaign actions The best groups don’t just meet, they are out taking action.

21. Delegation. Delegation. Why do we delegate? What happens if we don’t? Brainstorm!Brainstorm!

22. Tips for Delegation Divide: create a list of tasks and responsibilities Match: figure out which task best suits each member Ask: does this sound reasonable to them? What do they need to get it done? Remind: check-in to make sure things are going well Thank: showing appreciation goes a long way to ensure they’ll help you again

23. Delegation Example: Kick-Off Event and Party The Event: Your group plans to have a table in the middle of campus announcing your kick-off with a wrestling wind turbine and smoke stack. You want to follow up with a “Do it in the Dark” party to welcome new activists, get to know each other and educate students on energy conservation issues. Brainstorm – what tasks are involved with this event?Brainstorm – what tasks are involved with this event?

24. Your To-Do List = Tasks to Delegate Reserve the table Make info cards and flyers Make/order t-shirts Make signs Make costumes Get volunteers to wear costumes Make a tabling schedule and sign people up Buy candy and other hand outs Write a press release and pitch local media outlets Invite top administrators to the “Main Event” Invite other student organizations Find party location Get acoustic musicians to play Prepare food and drinks Set-up space Dorm Storm, class raps and prior tabling to recruit Every bullet point is an item on a sample to-do list. Every item is a task that can be delegated.Every bullet point is an item on a sample to-do list. Every item is a task that can be delegated.

25. Some More Tips Use the buddy system Create titles and give them out generously Focus on underclassmen Appoint people to identify and support new members at each event or meeting Have fun with each other!

26. Questions?? What specific problems are you facing with leadership in your group? What are some “best practices” you’ve found to be effective in your group?

27. Thanks! Kim Teplitzky, Sierra Student Coalition in PA, OH, MI, WV [email protected] - 215.508.3310 Joe Richie, Sierra Student Coalition in the Midwest [email protected] – 608.217.8869 Send any feedback on the training to [email protected]

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