Adminitration
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ADMINITRATION. OFFICE LAYOUT. Contents. What do we mean by Office Layout? Cellular Office Layout Open-Plan Office Layout Planning Office Layout Ergonomics Health & Safety legislation Health & Safety Policy Security in the workplace. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

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Adminitration

ADMINITRATION

OFFICE LAYOUT


Contents

Contents

  • What do we mean by Office Layout?

  • Cellular Office Layout

  • Open-Plan Office Layout

  • Planning Office Layout

  • Ergonomics

  • Health & Safety legislation

  • Health & Safety Policy

  • Security in the workplace

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8


What do we mean by office layout

What do we mean by Office Layout?

  • The office layout is the environment in which employees work.

  • It determines the following:

    • The way in which resources are placed in the office eg: employees; desks; equipment.

    • The amount of space provided.

CONTENTS

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Types of office layout

Types of Office Layout

There are 2 main types of office

layout:

  • CELLULARthis is a very traditional style of layout

  • OPEN-PLANalso known as flexible layout

CONTENTS

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Cellular traditional layout

Cellular (Traditional) Layout

This type of layout has the following

features:

  • Small rooms

  • Office consists of 1 or 2 employees

CONTENTS

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What are the advantages and disadvantages of working in a cellular office

What are the advantages and disadvantages of working in a cellular office?

ADVANTAGES

  • More privacy

  • More secure – only people who work in the office have access to it

  • Their own environment –it can be organised to suit the people working in it – heat, light etc.

  • Quiet to work in

CONTENTS

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What are the advantages and disadvantages working in a cellular office

What are the advantages and disadvantages working in a cellular office?

DISADVANTAGES

  • Staff can feel isolated

  • Staff may not feel part of a team

  • there is limitedspace for equipment

  • Equipment can’t be shared

  • Uneconomic in terms of heating and lighting

CONTENTS

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Open plan flexible layout

Open Plan (Flexible) Layout

This type of layout has the following

features:

  • Employees from different departments work together in the same larger area

  • In order to give some privacy screens/dividers are used

CONTENTS

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What are the advantages and disadvantages of working in an open plan office

What are the advantages and disadvantages of working in an open plan office?

  • Easier to communicate with others

  • Less wasted space

  • Resources can be shared

  • Can be designed for good workflow

  • better use of space

  • resources are able to be shared eg, photocopier, fax, printers etc

  • Easier to supervise staff

  • team ethos – staff will be encouraged to work together

ADVANTAGES

CONTENTS

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What are the advantages and disadvantages of working in an open plan office1

What are the advantages and disadvantages of working in an open plan office?

DISADVANTAGES

  • Security – theft may be more of a problem; it may be easier for unauthorised personnel to access confidential files

  • Can be really noisy

  • Lack of privacy – phone conversations, meetings etc can be overheard easily

  • Staff may find it difficult to manage their time effectively as there are too many distractions

CONTENTS

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Planning office layout

Planning office Layout

The layout of the office should ensure good workflow – the movement of people and paper around the office

Good office design will do the following:

  • site associated work areas together

  • Ensure no unnecessary physical barriers to workflow

  • Shared equipment/services sited centrally

  • Use an ergonomic design and take account of the needs of the people in the office

CONTENTS

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Ergonomics

Ergonomics

  • Furniture – desks/chairs that are designed for the equipment and adjust to individual requirements

  • Wall colours – relaxing, pleasant and minimise glare

  • Lighting – non-glare, natural light if possible, desk lamps

  • Ventilation – good circulation of air, avoid draughts

  • Noise control – appropriate choice of windows, walls and floor covering to reduce noise

  • Workstations –should allow for some privacy

  • Protective equipment – wrist-rests,

    anti-glare screens, foot rests

CONTENTS

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Why use ergonomic design

Why use ergonomic design?

  • Improves morale and motivation of staff

  • Helps productivity

  • Ensures effective flow of work

  • Promotes health & safety at work

  • Gives a positive image for the organisation

  • Can be cost-effective as all of the above will help staff be happy and healthy

CONTENTS

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Health safety in the workplace

Health & Safety in the Workplace

  • The Health & Safety at Work Act (HASAWA) 1974

    Updated to the following:

  • Workplace (Health and Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992

CONTENTS

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Hasawa provides a broad statement relating to the minimum h s requirements

HASAWA provides a broad statement relating to the minimum H&S requirements

It places responsibility on both employers and employees

  • Employers – must do all they can to provide a safe and secure workplace

  • Employees – must cooperate with H&S policy and take care of themselves and others

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Hasawa cont

HASAWA cont.......

The employer must

  • Provide a safe entrance and exit

  • Ensure safe methods of working

  • Provide safe working conditions – heat, light, toilets

  • Ensure safety of equipment

  • Ensure safe use and storage of hazardous substances

  • Provide protective clothing

  • Provide information and training on Health and Safety

  • Ensure staff are trained

  • Have a policy which is kept up to date

  • Provide a safety representative

  • Have first aid facilities and accident

    procedures

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Hasawa cont1

HASAWA cont.....

  • The employee must

    • take care of their own Health and Safety and that of others

    • cooperate on Health and Safety matters

    • Wear the protective clothing provided

    • Not misuse or interfere with the provision made

    • Attend training

    • report hazards and prevent accidents

CONTENTS

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Hawasa contains a number of other acts covering specific aspects of h s

HAWASA contains a number of other acts, covering specific aspects of H&S

  • Health & Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992

    • This covers the safe use of VDUs in the workplace

  • Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) 1994

    • Deals with the storage and control of hazardous substances and protective equipment and clothing

  • Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR) 1995

    • Deals with the reporting of serious and fatal accidents at work

CONTENTS

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Health and safety display screen equipment regulations 1992

Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992

  • Employers’ are responsible for ensuring

    • workstations and equipment meet minimum requirements

    • breaks or changes in activity are planned

    • training is given on use of equipment

    • safety checks are made

    • eyesight tests are given and glasses provided if required

  • Employees responsibilities

    • adjust VDUs

    • adjust chairs

    • sit correctly

    • use anti-glare screens

    • take breaks

CONTENTS

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Reporting of injuries diseases and dangerous occurrences regulations 1995 riddor

Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR)

If there is an occurrence of death or major injury

or

an incident preventing someone doing their job for more than three days

or

an employer becomes aware that an employee suffers from a reportable work related disease

The employer must forward an accident or disease report within 10 days

  • If there is a dangerous occurrence which could have resulted in a reportable injury

  • All records must be kept for 3 years detailing

    • date and method of reporting

    • date, time and place of event

    • personal details of those involved

    • description of the event

CONTENTS

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Health and safety first aid regulations 1991

Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1991

  • Employers must provide

    • qualified first aid people

    • a suitably stocked first aid box

    • a record of all incidents

    • information and training on first aid procedures

    • Appoint a first-aider – one for every 50-100 employees

CONTENTS

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Fire precautions regulations places of work 1995

Fire Precautions Regulations (Places of Work)1995

  • Employers must

    • Assess fire risks in the workplace

    • Check fire detection times and warning systems

    • Check evacuation routes

    • Provide reasonable fire-fighting equipment

    • Check employee knowledge of fire procedures

    • Check and maintain fire-safety equipment

    • Display fire notices and emergency exit signs

CONTENTS

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Health safety policy statement

Health & Safety Policy Statement

  • HASAWA requires by law that an organisation with 5 or more employees must have a written H&S policy

  • It demonstrates a commitment to achieving good H&S standards

  • It should clearly set out what is required by the employer and the employee to reduce accidents and ill health

  • It must be read, understood and followed by all staff

CONTENTS

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Security in the workplace

Security in the workplace

  • Staff entry and movement

    • Intercom and/or security doors

    • Identity passes should be carried or worn at all times

    • Handling/issuing keys - should be controlled

  • Visitors

    • Should report to reception

    • Reception should be at the main entrance

    • Should be logged in and out of the building in a visitor book

    • Visitor passes should be issued

    • Should not be left unsupervised

CONTENTS

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Adminitration

  • Access to information and technology

    • Passwords – should be regularly changed

    • Read-only files for documents that need to be read but protected

    • Password protected files to restrict access

    • Virus-screening software to ensure files are not lost or corrupted

    • Locking rooms, filing cabinets and computers

    • Confidential documents should be shredded when no longer required

    • Staff should log off or lock the computer when leaving their workstation

CONTENTS

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Other general security measures

Other general security measures

  • CCTV

  • Register of serial numbers for equipment in case stolen

  • Use of ultra violet markers to mark equipment

CONTENTS

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