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Welcome, Committee Members!. iNACOL Southeastern Regional Committee Webinar May 8 , 2014. Committee Chair Debi Crabtree CEO, Village Virtual LLC www.villagevirtual.com. Vice-Chair, Tara Rodriguez Kentucky Department of Education [email protected] Our Presenter.

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Welcome committee members
Welcome, Committee Members!

iNACOL Southeastern Regional Committee

Webinar

May 8, 2014

Committee Chair Debi Crabtree

CEO, Village Virtual LLC

www.villagevirtual.com

Vice-Chair, Tara Rodriguez

Kentucky Department of Education

[email protected]


Our presenter
Our Presenter

Dr. JeredBorup

Assistant Professor

Learning Technologies in Schools

George Mason University

Fairfax, VA

Holds a Ph.D. in Instructional Psychology and Technology from Brigham Young University and currently serves as an Assistant Professor in George Mason University’s Division of Learning Technologies.

https://sites.google.com/site/jeredborup

Today Dr. Borupwill be discussing how a fully online charter school in Utah has worked to support their online students, sharing a framework for examining support systems and how to use that framework to identify effective instructional strategies at Mountain Heights Academy (formerly the Open High School of Utah).  



Integration of Online Learning in Schools Master’s/Certificate

http://goo.gl/LMvTLV


The research team
The Research Team Master’s/Certificate

Jered Borup

Jeff Drysdale

Charles Graham

Richard West


http://cmsimg.indystar.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BG&Date=20140214&Category=SPORTS&ArtNo=302140061&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&q=80&NBA-All-Star-Celebrity-Game-2014-Arne-Duncan-gets-MVPhttp://cmsimg.indystar.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BG&Date=20140214&Category=SPORTS&ArtNo=302140061&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&q=80&NBA-All-Star-Celebrity-Game-2014-Arne-Duncan-gets-MVP


There are “http://cmsimg.indystar.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BG&Date=20140214&Category=SPORTS&ArtNo=302140061&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&q=80&NBA-All-Star-Celebrity-Game-2014-Arne-Duncan-gets-MVPgroups of students that, despite recent progress, are achieving and graduating at lower rates.”--Sec. Arne Duncan

Citation: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/arne-duncan/why-i-wear-80_b_4788503.html


?http://cmsimg.indystar.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BG&Date=20140214&Category=SPORTS&ArtNo=302140061&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&q=80&NBA-All-Star-Celebrity-Game-2014-Arne-Duncan-gets-MVP


Growth of k 12 online learning
Growth of K-12 Online Learninghttp://cmsimg.indystar.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BG&Date=20140214&Category=SPORTS&ArtNo=302140061&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&q=80&NBA-All-Star-Celebrity-Game-2014-Arne-Duncan-gets-MVP

Liu, F., Black, E., Algina, J., Cavanaugh, C., & Dawson, K. (2010). The Validation of One Parental Involvement Measurement in Virtual Schooling. Journal of Interactive Online Learning, 9(2), 105-132.


Why do online students fail
Why do online students fail? http://cmsimg.indystar.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BG&Date=20140214&Category=SPORTS&ArtNo=302140061&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&q=80&NBA-All-Star-Celebrity-Game-2014-Arne-Duncan-gets-MVP

  • Low self-regulation and meta-cognitive abilities(Cavanaugh, 2007; Moore, 1993, 2007; Rice, 2006; Hartley & Bendixen, 2001)

  • Lack of student motivation (Murphy & Rodriguez-Manzanares, 2009)

  • Sense of isolation and lack of community (Song et al., 2004; Vonderwell, 2003)

  • Absence of personal interaction (Dziuban, Hartman, & Moskal, 2004)

  • Unclear instructions (Hara & Kling, 1999; Song, Singleton, Hill, & Koh, 2004)


Why do online students fail1
Why do online students fail? http://cmsimg.indystar.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BG&Date=20140214&Category=SPORTS&ArtNo=302140061&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&q=80&NBA-All-Star-Celebrity-Game-2014-Arne-Duncan-gets-MVP

A lack of individualized support


NCAA claimed that http://cmsimg.indystar.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BG&Date=20140214&Category=SPORTS&ArtNo=302140061&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&q=80&NBA-All-Star-Celebrity-Game-2014-Arne-Duncan-gets-MVPself-paced online courses with low levels of human interaction are not “academically sound” (Brown, 2010, para. 5).


NCAA claimed that http://cmsimg.indystar.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BG&Date=20140214&Category=SPORTS&ArtNo=302140061&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&q=80&NBA-All-Star-Celebrity-Game-2014-Arne-Duncan-gets-MVPself-paced online courses with low levels of human interaction are not “academically sound” (Brown, 2010, para. 5).


NCAA claimed that http://cmsimg.indystar.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BG&Date=20140214&Category=SPORTS&ArtNo=302140061&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&q=80&NBA-All-Star-Celebrity-Game-2014-Arne-Duncan-gets-MVPself-paced online courses with low levels of human interaction are not “academically sound” (Brown, 2010, para. 5).

NCAA recently announced that it will no longer accept coursework from 24 virtual schools that use K12 Inc.


Articles focusing on student support
Articles Focusing on Student Supporthttp://cmsimg.indystar.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BG&Date=20140214&Category=SPORTS&ArtNo=302140061&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&q=80&NBA-All-Star-Celebrity-Game-2014-Arne-Duncan-gets-MVP

Borup, J., Graham, C. R., & Drysdale, J. S. (in press). The nature of teacher engagement at an online high school. British Journal of Educational Technology, doi:10.1111/bjet.12089

Borup, J., West, R. E., Graham, C. R., & Davies, R. S. (2014). The Adolescent Community of Engagement: A framework for research on adolescent online learning. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 22(1), 107–129.

Drysdale, J. S., Graham, C. R., & Borup, J. (2014). An online high school “shepherding” program: Teacher roles and experiences mentoring online students. Journal of Technology & Teacher Education, 22(1), 9–32.

Borup, J., Graham, C. R., & Davies, R. S. (2013). The nature of adolescent learner interaction in a virtual high school setting. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 29(2), 153–167.

Borup, J., Graham, C. R., & Velasquez, A. (2013). Technology-mediated caring: Building relationships between students and instructors in online K-12 learning environments. In M. Newberry, A. Gallant, & P. Riley (Eds.), Advances on Teaching: Vol. 18. Emotions in school: Understanding how the hidden curriculum influences relationships, leadership, teaching, and learning (pp. 183–202). Bimgley, UK: EmeraldBooks.

Borup, J., Graham, C. R., & Davies, R. S. (2013). The nature of parental interactions in an online charter school. American Journal of Distance Education, 27, 40–55.

Velasquez, A., Graham, C. R., & Osguthorpe, R. D. (2013). Caring in a technology-mediated online high school context. Distance Education, 34(1), 97–118.

Velasquez, A., Graham, C. R., & West, R. E. (2013). An investigation of practices and tools that enabled technology-mediated caring in an online high school. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 14(5), 277–299.


Articles focusing on student support1
Articles Focusing on Student Supporthttp://cmsimg.indystar.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BG&Date=20140214&Category=SPORTS&ArtNo=302140061&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&q=80&NBA-All-Star-Celebrity-Game-2014-Arne-Duncan-gets-MVP

Borup, J., Graham, C. R., & Drysdale, J. S. (in press). The nature of teacher engagement at an online high school. British Journal of Educational Technology, doi:10.1111/bjet.12089

Borup, J., West, R. E., Graham, C. R., & Davies, R. S. (2014). The Adolescent Community of Engagement: A framework for research on adolescent online learning. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 22(1), 107–129.

Drysdale, J. S., Graham, C. R., & Borup, J. (2014). An online high school “shepherding” program: Teacher roles and experiences mentoring online students. Journal of Technology & Teacher Education, 22(1), 9–32.

Borup, J., Graham, C. R., & Davies, R. S. (2013). The nature of adolescent learner interaction in a virtual high school setting. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 29(2), 153–167.

Borup, J., Graham, C. R., & Velasquez, A. (2013). Technology-mediated caring: Building relationships between students and instructors in online K-12 learning environments. In M. Newberry, A. Gallant, & P. Riley (Eds.), Advances on Teaching: Vol. 18. Emotions in school: Understanding how the hidden curriculum influences relationships, leadership, teaching, and learning (pp. 183–202). Bimgley, UK: EmeraldBooks.

Borup, J., Graham, C. R., & Davies, R. S. (2013). The nature of parental interactions in an online charter school. American Journal of Distance Education, 27, 40–55.

Velasquez, A., Graham, C. R., & Osguthorpe, R. D. (2013). Caring in a technology-mediated online high school context. Distance Education, 34(1), 97–118.

Velasquez, A., Graham, C. R., & West, R. E. (2013). An investigation of practices and tools that enabled technology-mediated caring in an online high school. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 14(5), 277–299.


The adolescent community of engagement framework a lens for research on adolescent online learning

The Adolescent Community of Engagement Framework: A Lens for Research on Adolescent Online Learning

Borup, J., West, R. E., Graham, C. R., & Davies, R. S. (2014). The Adolescent Community of Engagement: A framework for research on adolescent online learning. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 22(1), 107–129.


Benefits of a theoretical framework
Benefits of a Theoretical Framework Research on Adolescent Online Learning

  • Little research has examined adolescent student engagement in online learning environments

  • Rice (2006) stated that the lack of research is due in part to the absence of a “theoretical rational.”


Benefits of a theoretical framework1
Benefits of a Theoretical Framework Research on Adolescent Online Learning

  • Mishra and Koehler (2006) explained that a framework can guide researchers’ focus to what is important and to ignore the insignificant.

  • Frameworks benefit the community by “focusing perspective, revealing knowledge and suggesting alternatives” (Garrison, 2000, p.3).


Existing frameworks
Existing Frameworks Research on Adolescent Online Learning


Adolescent community of engagement ace framework
Adolescent Community of Engagement (ACE) Framework Research on Adolescent Online Learning


Adolescent community of engagement ace framework1
Adolescent Community of Engagement (ACE) Framework Research on Adolescent Online Learning

  • Student engagement

  • Teacher engagement

  • Parent engagement

  • Peer engagement


Adolescent student engagement
Adolescent Student Engagement Research on Adolescent Online Learning


Student engagement
Student Engagement Research on Adolescent Online Learning

Behavioral


Student engagement1
Student Engagement Research on Adolescent Online Learning

Behavioral

Cognitive


Student engagement2
Student Engagement Research on Adolescent Online Learning

Affective

Behavioral

Cognitive


Abcs of engagement
ABCs of Engagement Research on Adolescent Online Learning

Affective

Behavioral

Cognitive


Adolescent Community of Engagement (ACE) Research on Adolescent Online Learning

Student Engagement


Adolescent Community of Engagement (ACE) Research on Adolescent Online Learning

Parent Engagement

Student Engagement

High

Low


Adolescent Community of Engagement (ACE) Research on Adolescent Online Learning

Parent Engagement

Student Engagement

High

Low

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Volunteering

  • Organizing

  • Instructing


Adolescent Community of Engagement (ACE) Research on Adolescent Online Learning

Parent Engagement

Student Engagement

High

Low

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Volunteering

  • Organizing

  • Instructing


Adolescent Community of Engagement (ACE) Research on Adolescent Online Learning

Teacher Engagement

High

Low

Parent Engagement

Student Engagement

High

Low

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Volunteering

  • Organizing

  • Instructing


Adolescent Community of Engagement (ACE) Research on Adolescent Online Learning

Teacher Engagement

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Encouraging communication

  • Organizing and Designing

  • Instructing

High

Low

Parent Engagement

Student Engagement

High

Low

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Volunteering

  • Organizing

  • Instructing


Adolescent Community of Engagement (ACE) Research on Adolescent Online Learning

Teacher Engagement

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Encouraging communication

  • Organizing and Designing

  • Instructing

High

Low

Parent Engagement

Student Engagement

High

Low

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Volunteering

  • Organizing

  • Instructing


Adolescent Community of Engagement (ACE) Research on Adolescent Online Learning

Teacher Engagement

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Encouraging communication

  • Organizing and Designing

  • Instructing

High

Low

Peer Engagement

Parent Engagement

Student Engagement

Low

High

High

Low

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Volunteering

  • Organizing

  • Instructing


Adolescent Community of Engagement (ACE) Research on Adolescent Online Learning

Teacher Engagement

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Encouraging communication

  • Organizing and Designing

  • Instructing

High

Low

Peer Engagement

Parent Engagement

Student Engagement

Low

High

High

Low

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Volunteering

  • Organizing

  • Instructing

  • Instructing and collaborating

  • Motivating


Adolescent Community of Engagement (ACE) Research on Adolescent Online Learning

Teacher Engagement

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Encouraging communication

  • Organizing and Designing

  • Instructing

High

Low

Peer Engagement

Parent Engagement

Student Engagement

Low

High

High

Low

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Volunteering

  • Organizing

  • Instructing

  • Instructing and collaborating

  • Motivating


Adolescent Community of Engagement (ACE) Research on Adolescent Online Learning

  • Social Presence and Modeling: Enabling Elements

    • “the degree that a person is perceived as a ‘real person’ in mediated communication” (Gunawardena, 1995, p. 151).

    • In an online environment, all learner-instructor, learner-learner, and parent-instructor interactions are mediated through some form of technology.


Adolescent Community of Engagement (ACE) Research on Adolescent Online Learning

Teacher Engagement

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Encouraging communication

  • Organizing and Designing

  • Instructing

High

Low

Peer Engagement

Parent Engagement

Student Engagement

Low

High

High

Low

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Volunteering

  • Organizing

  • Instructing

  • Instructing and collaborating

  • Motivating


The nature of online teacher engagement at the open high school of utah

The Nature of Online Teacher Engagement at the Open High School of Utah

Borup, J., Graham, C. R., & Drysdale, J. S. (in press). The nature of teacher engagement at an online high school. British Journal of Educational Technology, doi:10.1111/bjet.12089


Teacher practice
Teacher Practice School of Utah

  • F2F teacher practice significantly impacts student success (Rivkin, Hanushek, & Kain, 2005; Slater, Davies, & Burgess, 2011).

  • Murphy and Rodriguez-Manzanares (2009) explained that Garrison et al.’s (2000) Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework may provide insights.


The community of inquiry
The Community of Inquiry School of Utah

http://www.uwb.edu/getattachment/learningtech/elearning/hybrid-learning/faculty-hybrid/hybrid-intro/coi-presentation-diagram.jpg


Teaching presence components
Teaching Presence Components School of Utah

  • Designing and Organizing

  • Instructing

  • Facilitating Discourse


Teaching presence components1
Teaching Presence Components School of Utah

  • Designing and Organizing

  • Instructing

  • Facilitating Discourse

  • These components were identifiedin a content analysis of online discussion boards.


Teaching presence components2
Teaching Presence Components School of Utah

  • Designing and Organizing

  • Instructing

  • Facilitating Discourse

Anderson et al. (2001) invited other researchers to extend these components to other aspects of teaching.


Teaching presence components3
Teaching Presence Components School of Utah

  • Designing and Organizing

  • Instructing

  • Facilitating Discourse

  • Archer (2010) explained that this type of expansion would require “a new look at the overall rational for the framework, as well as renewed methodological quandaries” (p. 69).


Teaching presence
Teaching Presence School of Utah

  • Designing and Organizing

  • Instructing

  • Facilitating Discourse

External locus of control

Lower meta-cognitive skills

Less self-regulation

=

/

Higher Education

High School


Teaching presence1
Teaching Presence School of Utah

  • Designing and Organizing

  • Instructing

  • Facilitating Discourse

  • Nurturing

  • Motivating

  • Monitoring

High School


Teacher engagement
Teacher Engagement School of Utah

  • Designing and Organizing

  • Instructing

  • Facilitating Discourse

  • Nurturing

  • Motivating

  • Monitoring

High School


Research context
Research Context School of Utah


Research context1
Research Context School of Utah


Instructional model
Instructional Model School of Utah

  • Most students and teachers are full-time online

  • Open content that teachers can modify

  • Reasonable student loads

  • Regular office hours

  • High level of interactions


Student and teacher populations 2011 2012 academic year
Student and Teacher Populations School of Utah(2011-2012 Academic Year)

  • 362 students

    • Over 80% took the majority or all of their course work at OHSU

  • 21 teachers

    • 15 full-time, 4 part-time, and 2 adjuncts

    • 4 online office hours each school day



Watson, J., School of UtahMurin, A., Vashaw, L., Gemin, B., & Rapp, C. (2011). Keeping pace with K-12 online learning: An annual review of policy and practice. Learning. Evergreen Education Group.


Data collection
Data Collection School of Utah

  • Data was collected Spring 2012

  • Conducted 22 teacher interviews

    • 11 teachers (9 full-time) across several content areas

    • 9 had previously taught F2F

  • Analyzed using elements of constant comparison coding methods (Glaser, 1965)

    • One person coded all interviews

    • Met regularly with another researcher to review coding, discuss themes, and resolve disagreements


Findings facilitating discourse
Findings: School of UtahFacilitating Discourse

“In a public school I learned how to deliver the material. Online I’ve learned to communicate.”



Facilitating discourse with students1
Facilitating Discourse with Students School of Utah

  • Contacting low performing students

“I’ve emailed a student saying, ‘Your grade dropped from a 90 down to an 82, and I’m just curious if everything’s okay.’”


Facilitating discourse with students2
Facilitating Discourse with Students School of Utah

  • Contacting low performing students

  • Checking in with students

‘Hey, how you doing? What’s going on?’”


Facilitating discourse with students3
Facilitating Discourse with Students School of Utah

  • Contacting low performing students

  • Checking in with students

  • Multiple means of communication

“We’re on Gmail so they can chat and call and whatever else means that they want to interact with us.”


Facilitating discourse with students4
Facilitating Discourse with Students School of Utah

  • Contacting low performing students

  • Checking in with students

  • Multiple means of communication

All teachers said that some students seemed to “disappear” from their class


Facilitating discourse with parents
Facilitating Discourse with Parents School of Utah

“I have a lot more parents here that will make the initial contactwith me rather than just sitting on the sidelines.”


Facilitating discourse with parents1
Facilitating Discourse with Parents School of Utah

  • Personally contacting parents

“I will talk to their parents, especially if they are the ones that really need that boost.”


Facilitating discourse with parents2
Facilitating Discourse with Parents School of Utah

  • Personally contacting parents

  • Keeping parents informed

“I’d say 90% that I send to students are carbon copied to their parents.”


Facilitating discourse with parents3
Facilitating Discourse with Parents School of Utah

  • Personally contacting parents

  • Keeping parents informed

  • Collaborating with parents

“We were able to work together to come up with a plan.”


Facilitating discourse with parents4
Facilitating Discourse with Parents School of Utah

  • Personally contacting parents

  • Keeping parents informed

  • Collaborating with parents

“Certain parents . . . never call me back [or] respond to a single e-mail.”



Facilitating discourse with teachers1
Facilitating Discourse with Teachers School of Utah

  • Sharing teaching strategies

“I just kind of sat on my computer and didn’t really know what I was supposed to be doing. . . . I started asking other teachers and thinking, ‘Oh, these are the things that I should be doing.’”


Facilitating discourse with teachers2
Facilitating Discourse with Teachers School of Utah

  • Sharing teaching strategies

  • Collaboration

“I do a lot of communicating with teachers about my special-ed kids—accommodations and how they are doing in class.”


Designing and organizing
Designing and Organizing School of Utah


Instructing
Instructing School of Utah


Nurturing
Nurturing School of Utah


Monitoring
Monitoring School of Utah


Motivating
Motivating School of Utah


Discussion and conclusion
Discussion and Conclusion School of Utah

  • The concept of teacher engagement was helpful in collecting and analyzing data.

  • Why is OHSU successful?

    • Teachers are able to spent time tutoring and interacting with students

    • Teachers were able to modify the course

    • Teachers motivate students using praise, incentives and punishments.

    • Teachers closely monitored student learning and behavior


Discussion and conclusion1
Discussion and Conclusion School of Utah

  • Teacher engagement is not a compressive list.

  • Such a list would “prevent an understanding of best practice of various roles in online K-12 environments” (Ferdig et al., 2009, p. 496).


An online high school shepherding program teacher roles and experiences mentoring online students

An online high school “shepherding” program: Teacher roles and experiences mentoring online students

Drysdale, J. S., Graham, C. R., & Borup, J. (2014). An online high school “shepherding” program: Teacher roles and experiences mentoring online students. Journal of Technology & Teacher Education, 22(1), 9–32.


Student support
Student Support roles and experiences mentoring online students

Harms, C. M., Niederhauser, D. S., Davis, N. E., Roblyer, M. D., & Gilbert, S. B. (2006). Educating educators for virtual schooling: Communicating roles and responsibilities. The Electronic Journal of Communication, 16(1 & 2).


Harms, C. M., roles and experiences mentoring online studentsNiederhauser, D. S., Davis, N. E., Roblyer, M. D., & Gilbert, S. B. (2006). Educating educators for virtual schooling: Communicating roles and responsibilities. The Electronic Journal of Communication, 16(1 & 2).


Harms, C. M., roles and experiences mentoring online studentsNiederhauser, D. S., Davis, N. E., Roblyer, M. D., & Gilbert, S. B. (2006). Educating educators for virtual schooling: Communicating roles and responsibilities. The Electronic Journal of Communication, 16(1 & 2).



Research purpose
Research Purpose facilitators

  • Examine how a full-time online charter school is working to provide students with facilitator support.


Shepherding program
“Shepherding” Program facilitators

  • Shepherds (who were also course instructors):

    • facilitated about 20 students

    • contacted students regularly to discuss non-content related issues

    • acted as students’ anchor adultwho they can “ask questions and solicit advice”

    • helped students “feel comfortable, encouraged and understood”


Data collection and analysis
Data Collection and Analysis facilitators

  • Collected Spring-Fall of 2013

  • 18 teachers participated in five 90-minute focus groups

  • 5 Teachers participated in individual interviews

  • Focus group transcriptions were analyzed using elements of constant comparison coding (Glaser, 1965).


Findings selecting students
Findings: Selecting Students facilitators

  • Teachers competed for “easy sheep”

“They were stealing my kids. . . I had had it, and I fought for those kids.”


Findings selecting students1
Findings: Selecting Students facilitators

  • MHA instituted a draft to alleviate the competition

“that’s a waste of my time.”


Findings selecting students2
Findings: Selecting Students facilitators

  • MHA instituted a draft to alleviate the competition

“I actually wish the draft was eliminated and that students were randomly assigned out.”


Findings contacting students
Findings: Contacting Students facilitators

  • Teachers contacted students more frequently at the start of the semester

“especially at the beginning I had a lot of kids that would ask [technology questions], ‘How do I insert whatever technology? How do I do this? How do I do that? How do I set up my email?’”


Findings contacting students1
Findings: Contacting Students facilitators

  • Students were not informed of the program making it awkward for teachers

“I’ve had so many weird phone calls where I call and it’s awkward. [Students ask] ‘are you calling about my grades?’ and I’m like ‘No, I’m just calling to see how you are!’ It’s a little weird.”


Findings shepherding benefits
Findings: Shepherding Benefits facilitators

  • Facilitated interactions

“I have a lot of kids that call me and say, ‘I am so stressed about this class. I don’t know what to do.’ . . . Sometimes I have even gone with them to talk with their other teacher . . . just to be that ally they need to be successful.”


Findings shepherding benefits1
Findings: Shepherding Benefits facilitators

  • Allowed teachers to understand students’ backgrounds

“Through interactions I have had with him, we realized that he is the breadwinner for the family so he works two jobs . . . when we get those little tid bits as teachers, we can share that [with other teachers] with confidentiality.”


Findings shepherding limitations
Findings: Shepherding Limitations facilitators

  • Some students would not communicate

“A shepherd is supposed to walk and [the sheep] follow. I feel like I am pushing and it makes me frustrated. . . I am a herder, not a shepherd.”


Findings shepherding limitations1
Findings: Shepherding Limitations facilitators

  • Had the largest impact on students in the middle.

“a little engagement goes a long way with them.”


Findings teacher satisfaction
Findings: Teacher Satisfaction facilitators

  • “I feel so satisfied with my job. I love getting to knowthese kidseven better.”

  • “shepherding program kind of makes you look like a rock star teacher in their eyes.”

  • “I love getting to know them, so I personally think it’s a great thing. It does take a little extra time but I think it’s worth it.”


Conclusions
Conclusions facilitators

  • The program appeared effective with some but not all students

  • A more targeted approach may prove more helpful

  • More interaction is needed initially

  • Reduce the administrative load for teachers

  • Students and parents should be told of the program

  • Broaden the focus to include learning skills

  • Roblyer (2006) stated that “facilitators are made, not born” (p. 34).


Moving Forward facilitators

Adolescent Community of Engagement (ACE)

Teacher Engagement

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Encouraging communication

  • Organizing and Designing

  • Instructing

High

Low

Peer Engagement

Parent Engagement

Student Engagement

Low

High

High

Low

  • Facilitating interaction

    • Nurturing

    • Monitoring and Motivating

    • Volunteering

  • Organizing

  • Instructing

  • Instructing and collaborating

  • Motivating



Next meeting
Next Meeting facilitators

May 8, 2014

Presenter: Dr. JeredBorup

Assistant Professor

Learning Technologies in Schools

George Mason University

Fairfax, VA

Topic: A review of research conducted in Utah

in area of Student Support


Next meeting1
Next Meeting facilitators

September 11, 2014

Thank-you for your participation this past year.

Your contribution to the conversation is essential.

Have a wonderful spring & summer!


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