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THE BENEFIT OF BEING PRESENT. How Mindfulness Practice Positively Impacts Our Health and Well-Being. Garrett Hooper Body Mind Wellness Challenge March 2010.

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The benefit of being present

THE BENEFIT OF BEING PRESENT

How Mindfulness Practice

Positively Impacts

Our Health and Well-Being

Garrett Hooper

Body Mind Wellness Challenge

March 2010


“Mindfulness is a moment-to-moment, non-judgmental awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”Jon Kabat-Zinn, Coming to Our Senses


What is mindfulness
What is Mindfulness? awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”

  • Present moment awareness

  • Non-judgmental

  • Non-reactive

  • Openhearted

  • Challenge to the monkey-mind


Mindfulness is not
Mindfulness is not…. awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”

  • Thinking

  • Daydreaming

  • Spacing out

  • Repeating affirmations

  • Self-hypnosis

  • Sleeping


Mindfulness is
Mindfulness Is… awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”

  • Stopping our automatic, habitual pattern of reactivity

  • A space between one’s perception and response

  • Reflectivity, not reflexivity

  • Investigative awareness

    • Observation, discrimination, causality


Orientation to experience
Orientation to Experience awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”

  • Attitude of curiosity

    • Where the mind goes…

    • What is the object of experience?

  • Everything is relevant

  • Not trying to produce a “state”

  • Acceptance of each moment


The stress response
The Stress Response awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”

  • Good stress, bad stress

    • Life on the Serengeti

    • Life commuting on the 405

  • Chronic stress shutdown

    • Immune system

    • Digestive system

    • Reproductive system


Predictions
Predictions awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”

  • Reduced use of strategies to avoid aspects of experience

  • Increase dispositional openness

  • Change of psychological context

  • Improved affect tolerance

  • Emotional awareness

  • Relationship between thoughts, feelings, and actions


Predictions1
Predictions awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”

  • Insight into the nature of thought

    • Passing events of the mind, NOT

      inherent aspects of the self

  • Awareness of thoughts as…

    • Contextual

    • Relativistic

    • Transient

    • Subjective


Origins
Origins awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”

  • Most cultures have some form of mindfulness practice:

    • Breath meditation

    • Mantra

    • Yoga

    • T’ai Chi

    • Contemplative prayer


Why mindfulness
Why Mindfulness? awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”

Physiological Benefits

  • Decreased heart-rate during meditation

  • Lower blood-pressure in normal and moderately hypertensive individuals

  • Quicker recovery from stress

  • Increase in alpha rhythms (relaxation)

  • Increase in synchronization (hemispheres)

  • Reduced cholesterol levels

  • Reduction in the intensity of pain


Why mindfulness1
Why Mindfulness? awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”

Psychological Benefits

  • Greater happiness and peace of mind

  • Less emotional reactivity

  • Increased empathy

  • Enhanced creativity

  • Heightened perceptual clarity

  • Reduction in acute and chronic anxiety

  • Enhanced self-actualization


Therapeutic interventions
Therapeutic Interventions awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”

  • Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR)

  • Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)

  • Reduction of symptoms:

    • Chronic Pain

    • Anxiety

    • Depression

    • Eating Disorders

    • Fibromyalgia

    • Psoriasis

    • ADHD


MBSR awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”

  • 8-week program: meditation, body scan,

    hatha yoga

  • Baer’s Meta-analysis: MBSR effective in reducing stress, increasing well-being

  • Research: reduction of stress in medical students

    • Shapiro, et al., 1998; Rosenzweig, et al., 2003

  • Research: reduction of stress in cancer patients

    • Carlson, et al., 2004; Tacon, et al., 2004.


The science of mindfulness
The Science of Mindfulness awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”

  • Reduction of negative affect

  • Increase in left-side activity of the prefrontal cortex

  • Increase in immune-system functioning

  • Increased gamma-wave oscillations (synchrony)

    Davidson, R. J., Kabat-Zinn, J., Schumacher, J., Rosenkranz, M., et. al. (2003). Alterations in brain function produced by mindfulness meditation. Psychosomatic Medicine, 65, 564-570.


Everyday mindfulness
Everyday Mindfulness awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”

Breath Meditation

Walking Meditation

Eating Meditation


Making time for mindfulness
Making awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.” Time for Mindfulness

  • Set aside 5-10 minutes per day

  • Find time before, during, or after one of your regular activities:

    • Add 5 minutes of mindfulness during mealtime

    • Meditate for a few minutes before watching TV

    • Meditate before work begins, during your lunch hour, or at the end of the workday


References
References awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”

Baer, R. A. (2003). Mindfulness training as a clinical intervention: A conceptual and empirical review. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 10(2), 125-143.

Bishop, S. R., Lau, M., Shapiro, S., Carlson, L., Anderson, N. D., Carmody, J., Segal, Z. V., Abbey, S., Speca, M., Velting, D., Devins, G. (2004). Mindfulness: A proposed operational definition. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 11(3), 230-241.

Brown, K. W., Ryan, R. M. (2003). The benefits of being present: Mindfulness and its role in psychological well-being. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84, 822-848.

Rosenzweig, S., Reibel, D. K., Greeson, J. M., Brainard, et. al. (2003). Mindfulness-based stress reduction lowers psychological distress in medical students. Teaching and Learning in Medicine, 15(2), 88-92.

Shapiro, S. L., Schwartz, G. E., & Bonner, G. (1998). Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on medical and premedical students. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 21, 581-599.


References1
References awareness, cultivated by paying attention in a specific way, that is, in the present moment, and as non-reactively, as non-judgmentally, and as openheartedly as possible.”

Tacón, A. M., Caldera, Y. M., Ronaghan, C. (2004). Mindfulness-based stress reduction in women with breast cancer. Families, Systems, & Health, 22, 193-203.

Teasdale, J. D., Williams, J. M., Soulsby, J. M., Segal, Z. V., Ridgeway, V. A., & Lau, M. A. (2000). Prevention of relapse/recurrence in major depression by mindfulness-based cognitive therapy. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 68, 615-623.


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