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Challenges and Opportunities in Health Sciences Librarianship: Health and Medical Information Retrieval. Frankie Pasion February 14, 2014. Overview. Explore the challenges in health sciences librarianship with respect to health/medical information retrieval

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Frankie Pasion February 14, 2014

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Frankie pasion february 14 2014

Challenges and Opportunities in Health Sciences Librarianship: Health and Medical Information Retrieval

Frankie Pasion

February 14, 2014


Overview

Overview

Explore the challenges in health sciences librarianship with respect to health/medical information retrieval

Explore opportunities created to respond to these challenges: new and emerging roles for health sciences librarians


Challenges

Challenges

It is estimated that the doubling of medical knowledge in:

  • 1950 was 50 years

  • 1980 was 7 years

  • 2010 was 3.5

    “In 2020 it is projected to be 0.2 years – just 73 days… What was learned in the first 3 years of medical school will be just 6% of what is known at the end of the decade from 2010 to 2020.”

    - Challenges and Opportunities Facing Medical Education, Denson, 2011


Challenges1

Challenges

The rapid expansion of knowledge challenges our ability to assimilate and apply it effectively

  • Overwhelming amount of information on the internet and online

    • Google, Google Scholar, PubMed, OPAC, etc…

    • Time constraints for end users to navigate through millions of articles, hundreds of journals and dozens of databases

    • End users are not trained to evaluate sources

    • Recent graduates in MLIS lack expert searching skills in health sciences librarianship


Frankie pasion february 14 2014

A - drug treatments rheumatoid arthritisB - rheumatoid arthritis drug treatment therapyC - “rheumatoid arthritis” AND (therapy OR therapeutics OR treatment)D - (“rheumatoid arthritis” OR RA) AND (therapy OR therapeutics OR treatment)


Frankie pasion february 14 2014

A - drug treatments rheumatoid arthritisB - rheumatoid arthritis drug treatment therapyC - “rheumatoid arthritis” AND (therapy OR therapeutics OR treatment)D - (“rheumatoid arthritis” OR RA) AND (therapy OR therapeutics OR treatment)


Challenges2

Challenges

Examples of informational needs in evidence based medicine:

  • Medical knowledge

    • Text books, journals, databases, web sources

    • Practice guidelines, drugs, clinical trials, research literature etc.

  • Data (health and sickness in populations)

    • Public health departments

      Other informational needs:

  • Policies, administrative, legal, local information on doctors for referral, etc.


Challenges3

Challenges

End users and recent MLIS graduates lack the skills required to be expert searchers

The Medical Library Association (MLA) defines 13 skills required to become an expert searcher:

  • Ability to identify and search resources beyond the electronically available published literature, gray literature, unpublished information, and Web documents

  • John Hopkins tragedy in 2001 prompts standards

    • Healthy 24 year old asthma volunteer died from hexamethonium,

    • Researcher failed to find multiple citations that indicated risk (used only PubMed)

  • MLA webpage about standards in expert searching http://www.mlanet.org/resources/expert_search/policy_expert_search.html


Opportunities

Opportunities

  • Traditional health sciences librarian roles remain the same today, but they are doing different things now to keep pace with technology.

  • Health sciences librarians are evolving with technology and trends to facilitate the delivery of information and knowledge to students, faculty, researchers, physicians and other medical professionals and consumers of health information

  • Though roles remain the same new opportunities emerge with changing job descriptions and new twists to old roles


Opportunities1

Opportunities

New roles for health sciences librarians documented in literature from 1990-2012

  • Embedded Librarian:

    • Liaison

    • Informationist

    • Clinical Informationist

    • Public Informationist

    • Disaster relief information specialist

      New Activities and Changing Roles of Health Sciences Librarians: A Systematic Review, 1990-2012, Diane Cooper and Janet Crum, 2013


Opportunities2

Opportunities

  • Systematic review librarian

  • Emerging technologies librarian (user experience librarian)

  • Continuing medical education librarian

  • Grants development librarian

  • Data management librarian (research data librarian, data services librarian)

    New Activities and Changing Roles of Health Sciences Librarians: A Systematic Review, 1990-2012, Diane Cooper and Janet Crum, 2013


Opportunities3

Opportunities

New roles for health sciences librarians identified by job announcements, 2008-2012

  • Metadata librarian

  • Digital content librarian

  • Scholarly communication librarian

  • Translational librarian

    New Activities and Changing Roles of Health Sciences Librarians: A Systematic Review, 1990-2012, Diane Cooper and Janet Crum, 2013


Opportunities4

Opportunities

New twists on old roles

  • Clinical medical librarian

  • Instruction librarian

  • Outreach librarian

  • Consumer health librarian

    New Activities and Changing Roles of Health Sciences Librarians: A Systematic Review, 1990-2012, Diane Cooper and Janet Crum, 2013


Opportunities5

Opportunities

Job listings, descriptions…

  • Health sciences librarian (listed under healthcare occupations)

  • Health sciences librarian

  • Consumer health librarian

    • Job 1

    • Job 2

  • Information scientist/librarian - pharmaceutical


Opportunities6

Opportunities

Posted on MLA website


Frankie pasion february 14 2014

MLA listing


Frankie pasion february 14 2014

Biomedical/Research Services Liaison (UL306)


Conclusion

Conclusion

Challenges in health sciences librarianship: health and medical information retrieval

  • Overload of internet and online information

  • The untrained end user lack the skills to effectively retrieve reliable, relevant, results, and the ability to evaluate those sources.

  • Recent MLIS graduates lack hands on experience and clinical experience.

    Opportunities in health sciences librarianship: New and emerging roles

  • To respond to these challenges new and emerging have developed where librarians have become information specialists, integral to medical teams and institutions

  • Librarians contribute to emergency preparedness, assist researchers and others in data management, reach out beyond the library to serve hospitals and communities with health/medical information needs, provide access through metadata cataloging, select and implement digital sources, and other new roles related to new technologies.

  • Recent MLIS graduate have opportunities via fellowships


Questions

Questions


B ibliography

Bibliography

Arnott Smith, Catherine. 2005. “An Evolution of Experts: MEDLINE in the Library School.” Journal of the Medical Library Association 93 (1): 53–60.

Cooper, I. Diane, and Janet A Crum. 2013. “New Activities and Changing Roles of Health Sciences Librarians: A Systematic Review, 1990-2012.” Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA 101 (4): 268–77. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.101.4.008.

Densen, Peter. 2011. “Challenges and Opportunities Facing Medical Education.” Transactions of the American Clinical and Climatological Association 122: 48–58.

Detlefsen, Ellen Gay. 2012. “Teaching about Teaching and Instruction on Instruction: A Challenge for Health Sciences Library Education.” Journal of the Medical Library

Haines, Laura L., Jeanene Light, Donna O’Malley, and Frances A. Delwiche. 2010. “Information-Seeking Behavior of Basic Science Researchers: Implications for Library Services.” Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA 98 (1): 73–81. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.98.1.019.

Harrison, Janet, and Sally J. E. Sargeant. 2004. “Clinical Librarianship in the UK: Temporary Trend or Permanent Profession? Part II: Present Challenges and Future Opportunities.” Health Information & Libraries Journal 21 (4): 220–26.


Bibliography

Bibliography

Martin, Elaine R. 2013. “Shaping Opportunities for the New Health Sciences Librarian.” Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA 101 (4): 252–53.

McGowan, Julie J. 2012a. “Evolution, Revolution, or Obsolescence: An Examination of Writings on the Future of Health Sciences Libraries.” Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA 100 (1): 5–9. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.100.1.003.

———. 2012b. “Tomorrow’s Academic Health Sciences Library Today.” Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA 100 (1): 43–46. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.100.1.008.

“mlab_93_112.53_60.tp - zotero://attachment/177/.” 2014a. Accessed February 12. zotero://attachment/177/.

Savulescu, J., and M. Spriggs. 2002. “The Hexamethonium Asthma Study and the Death of a Normal Volunteer in Research.” Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (1): 3–4. doi:10.1136/jme.28.1.3.

Schulte, Stephanie J. 2011. “Eliminating Traditional Reference Services in an Academic Health Sciences Library: A Case Study.” Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA 99 (4): 273–79. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.99.4.004.

Tarver, Talicia, Dixie A Jones, Mararia Adams, and Alejandro Garcia. 2013. “The Librarian’s Role in Linking Patients to Their Personal Health Data and Contextual Information.” Medical Reference Services Quarterly 32 (4). doi:10.1080/02763869.2013.837730. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3818718/.


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