Nutrition standards in the national school lunch and school breakfast program
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Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Program. Questions & Answers f or Program Operators. December 13, 2010, President Obama signed into law Public Law 111-296, the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA).

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Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Program

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Nutrition standards in the national school lunch and school breakfast program

Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Program

Questions & Answers

for Program Operators


Why is usda setting new meal patterns and dietary specifications for school meals

  • December 13, 2010, President Obama signed into law Public Law 111-296, the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA).

  • Last update to school meal standards was over 15 years ago.

  • Critically needed to help combat childhood obesity as well as childhood hunger.

  • Nearly 1 in 3 children are at risk for preventable diseases like diabetes and heart disease, due to overweight and obesity.

Why is USDA setting new meal patterns and dietary specifications for school meals?


Why is usda setting new meal patterns and dietary specifications for school meals continued

  • Implementation Dates:

    • New lunch meal pattern is effective July 1, 2012, the beginning of SY 2012-2013.

    • Changes to the breakfast program will be phased-in beginning July 1, 2013.

Why is USDA setting new meal patterns and dietary specifications for school meals? (continued)


Implementation timeline for final rule

Implementation Timeline for Final Rule


Comparison of current and new regulatory requirements national school lunch program

Comparison of Current and New Regulatory Requirements -National School Lunch Program


Comparison of current and new regulatory requirements national school breakfast program

Comparison of Current and New Regulatory Requirements -National School Breakfast Program


Comparison of current and new regulatory requirements nutrient standards new standards k 12

Comparison of Current and New Regulatory Requirements -Nutrient Standards – New Standards K-12


Final rule nutrition standards breakfast meal pattern lunch meal pattern

Final Rule Nutrition Standards Breakfast Meal PatternLunch Meal Pattern


Fruits and vegetables

Fruits and Vegetables:


Fruits and vegetables1

  • Pasteurized, full-strength fruit juice and vegetable juice may be offered (it is credited to meet no more than one-half of the fruits or vegetables component).

  • Fruits and vegetables are two separate food components.

  • Required quantities are established in the meal patterns for lunch and breakfast.

Fruits and Vegetables:


Fruits and vegetables continued

  • Over the course of the week, the following vegetables must be offered dark green (broccoli, collard greens, spinach, etc); red/orange (carrots, pumpkin, sweet potatoes, etc); dry beans/peas (legumes – black beans, kidney beans, lentils, etc.); starchy (corn, peas, white potatoes, etc.); and “other” vegetables (asparagus, bean sprouts, green beans, etc.).

  • USDA plans to release additional guidance to assist school food authorities in classifying vegetables in the appropriate subgroup.

  • Vegetables are an option for breakfast.

Fruits and Vegetables: (continued)


Nutrition standards in the national school lunch and school breakfast program

  • Under Offer vs. Serve, schools must offer enough for each child to take the full required amount of each component, but a student may take smaller portions of the fruits and vegetables components, if desired.

  • Students must select at least ½ cup daily of the fruits or vegetables components for a meal to be considered reimbursable under Offer vs. Serve in the NSLP and SBP.

  • They must take at least ½ cup to meet minimum but are allowed to take 1 full cup.

How can schools minimize food waste while requiring students to take a fruit or a vegetable as part of the meal?


Meat meat alternate

Meat/Meat Alternate:


Is a daily meat meat alternate required at breakfast

  • No. As long as you are providing enough grain, it is at the district’s discretion to offer a protein.

Is a daily meat/meat alternate required at breakfast?


Grains

Grains:


Grains1

  • New weekly grains ranges plus daily minimum requirement.

  • In the first year of implementation, at least half of the grains offered during the school week must be whole grain-rich for LUNCH.

  • In the second year of rule implementation, at least half of the grains offered during the school week must be whole grain-rich for BREAKFAST.

  • On the third year of rule implementation, all grains offered during the school week must be whole grain-rich for both breakfast and lunch.

Grains:


How will schools identify whole grain rich products

  • The Institute of Medicine has established a 2 Element Process to identify whole grain products:

    • Element #1. A serving of the food item must meet portion size requirements for the Grains/Breads component as defined in FNS guidance.

How will schools identify whole grain-rich products?


How will schools identify whole grain rich products continued

  • Element #2. The food must meet at least one of the following:

    • Whole grains per serving (based on minimum serving sizes specified for grains/breads in FNS guidance> must be ≥ 8 grams. May be determined from product packaging or by the manufacturer, if available. Manufacturers may apply for a Child Nutrition Label.

    • Product packaging includes the following FDA approved whole grain health claim “Diets rich in whole grain foods and other plant foods and low in total fat, saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease and some cancers.”

How will schools identify whole grain-rich products? (continued)


How will schools identify whole grain rich products continued1

  • Product ingredient listing lists whole grain first, specifically:

    • Non-mixed dishes (e.g., breads, cereals): Whole grains must be the primary ingredient by weight (a whole grain is the first ingredient in the list).

    • Mixed dishes (e.g., pizza, corn dogs): Whole grains must be the primary grain ingredient by weight (a whole grain is the first grain ingredient in the list).

      Element #2c is a practical way for schools to identify whole grain-rich products. Eventually the FDA will establish a labeling system.

How will schools identify whole grain-rich products? (continued)


Nutrition standards in the national school lunch and school breakfast program

Milk:


Milk continued

  • Only fat-free (unflavored and flavored) and low-fat (1%) milk (unflavored) may be offered as part of the reimbursable meal.

  • Required and optional milk substitutes are considered meal exceptions and are not subject to this final rule.

Milk (continued)


Sodium

Sodium:


Sodium continued

  • Operators have 5 years to meet Target 1.

  • USDA is also facilitating implementation of the sodium requirement by offering low-sodium products through USDA Foods.

Sodium (continued)


Sodium continued1

Sodium Limits and Timeline

Sodium (continued)


Offer vs serve ovs

Offer vs. Serve (OVS):


How will ovs be implemented under the final rule

  • OVS continues to be a requirement in the NSLP for high schools, and an option for lower grade schools.

How will OVS be implemented under the final rule?


How will ovs be implemented under the final rule continued

NSLP:

  • Schools must offer 5 food components.

  • Students are allowed to decline 2 of the 5 required food components.

  • Must select at least ½ cup of either a fruit or vegetable – not both.

  • Students must select the other food components in the quantities planned.

How will OVS be implemented under the final rule? (continued)


How will ovs be implemented under the final rule continued1

SBP:

  • Schools must offer 3 food components (milk, fruits and grains).

  • Consist of a minimum of 4 food items.

  • May decline 1 food item.

  • Must select at least ½ cup of fruit.

  • Students must select the other food components in the quantities planned.

How will OVS be implemented under the final rule? (continued)


Usda foods

USDA Foods:


Usda foods continued

  • USDA Foods are better than ever.

  • Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and healthy sources of protein are available.

  • USDA Foods program offers reduced sodium canned beans and vegetables; a variety of frozen fruits and vegetables without added sugar and salt; and sodium and reduced-fat processed and blended cheeses, fajita strips, and beef products.

USDA FOODS (continued)


Implementation

Implementation:


How will fns assist with implementation of the new meal requirements

  • FNS will provide training and technical assistance to program operators through a variety of methods, including webinars, special training sessions and conference presentations.

  • FNS is updating the Food Buying guide and other essential resources.

  • The Child Nutrition Labeling Program is also being updated.

How will FNS assist with implementation of the new meal requirements?


Monitoring

Monitoring:


Monitoring continued

  • Indiana DOE administrative reviews every 3 years beginning in 2013-14.

  • SFAs are not required to conduct a nutrient analysis but they are expected to follow the meal pattern to meet nutrient targets.

  • State agencies will assess compliance with the meal requirements based on a nutrient analysis of one week of menus.

Monitoring (continued)


Monitoring continued1

  • FNS will develop additional guidance on the implementation of the new administrative review cycle.

  • Requirements for certification of school food authorities for the 6 cents reimbursement will be provided in a forthcoming interim rule, expected to be published in Spring 2012.

Monitoring (continued)


Monitoring continued2

  • State Agency Action:

    • must apply immediate fiscal action if the meals offered are completely missing a required food component.

    • must take fiscal action for repeated violations of the vegetable subgroup and milk type requirements.

    • has discretion to take fiscal action for repeatedviolations of the food quantity, whole grain requirements and dietary specifications.

Monitoring (continued)


Miscellaneous

  • The meals for children with recognized medical disabilities that restrict their diet are not affected.

  • Optional accommodations for children with special dietary needs (without recognized medical disabilities) must be consistent with the new meal patterns and dietary specifications.

Miscellaneous:


Miscellaneous continued

  • In individual cases where a school district has an unusual grade configuration that prevents the use of the required age/grade groups, it may serve the same lunch and breakfast to children in grades K-5 and 6-8. However, care must be taken to meet the sodium and calorie requirements for each grade group.

Miscellaneous: (continued)


Miscellaneous continued1

  • One food-based menu planning approach and same age/grade groups.

  • Calorie minimum and maximum levels

  • Schools offering the SSO this summer have the option to follow new meal requirements or the requirements currently in place in SY 2011-2012.

Miscellaneous: (continued)


Resources

  • http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/Governance/Legislation/nutritionstandards.htm

  • http://teamnutrition.usda.gov/healthierUS

  • www.ChooseMyPlate.gov

Resources:


Questions

QUESTIONS


Group discussion

GROUP DISCUSSION


Are any of your districts already meeting any of the new guidelines

Are any of your districts already meeting any of the new guidelines?

Which ones?

How have you made it successful?

What are some tips on implementing the new guidelines?


Sharing your plans

Sharing your plans:

Has anyone begun planning for implementation?

What do you think the training needs will be?


Share your contact information

SHARE YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION….

We are in this together!!


Thank you

Thank You!


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