Incredible Stories

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ReadThinkDream. Ride me the wavesof a story,Settle me down by a brook,Dream me the land only dreamed of,Book me a voyageby book. J. Patrick Lewis. Introducing the Theme. Have you ever read a story that has taken you to a faraway place? What does J.Patrick Lewis mean when he says, Book me a voyage by book"?What is the object or tool in the picture above?What does a telescope have to do with dreaming and imagining?.

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Incredible Stories

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1. Incredible Stories! Houghton Mifflin Theme Three Mr. Brumfield Lawnton Elementary, Grade Three

2. Read…Think…Dream Ride me the waves of a story, Settle me down by a brook, Dream me the land only dreamed of, Book me a voyage by book

3. Introducing the Theme Have you ever read a story that has taken you to a faraway place? What does J.Patrick Lewis mean when he says, “Book me a voyage by book”? What is the object or tool in the picture above? What does a telescope have to do with dreaming and imagining?

4. Introductory Letter by Jerdine Nolen What makes a story incredible? Author Jerdine Nolen sometimes creates an “idea box” to help her create an incredible story. If you would create an idea box, what would you put inside? Look at the book covers on page 307 and make predictions.

6. Comprehension Skill: Fantasy versus Realism In writing there are different categories or genres of books. One category is “fantasy”, like the story The Lost and Found. What makes a story a fantasy? events & characters that can’t exist in real life Fantasy stories often do include realistic details to make the story more believable, more interesting, and more humorous.

7. Kidspiration Character Sort Can you classify characters into the categories of realism and fantasy?

8. Personification An easy way to identify elements of fantasy is by understanding personification. Personification is when an author makes a non-human object seem like a person, with feelings and human characteristics. Anytime you have an animal or an object talking or feeling, you know the story is fantasy.

9. Smartboard Minilesson What is personification? How do author’s use personification?

10. Cows from Outer Space By Jeanne Modesitt

11. Think about the Read Aloud What are some details that show that this is fantasy? Why do the parents think that the children have good imaginations? Why don’t the parents believe that their children spent the afternoon with cows in London?

12. Dogzilla

13. Vocabulary colossal creature heroic horrifying monstrous terrifying tremendous

14. Applying the Vocabulary

15. Synonyms and Antonyms

17. Independent Vocabulary Practice Complete the vocabulary chart on page 195 of your practice book.

18. Skill: Fantasy versus Realism What is the difference between fantasy and realism? Give some examples of stories or movies you are familiar with, and explain why they are fantasy or realism. Throughout this story, look for examples of both fantasy and realism.

19. Fantasy Versus Realism Classify story details as fantasy or realism.

20. Reading Comprehension Why was this story set in a city instead of a small town?

21. Reading Comprehension How are the mice characters personified?

22. Reading Comprehension Why might the author have chosen to include a volcano in the story?

23. Reading Comprehension Why do you think the Commander is named “Big Cheese”?

24. Reading Comprehension Do you think Dogzilla is truly a terrible monster?

25. Reading Comprehension How is this story similar to other monster stories?

26. Reading Comprehension How can you tell that the author wants to the readers to think that Professor O’Hairy is smart?

27. Reading Comprehension Why did the mice choose the dog bath as the best solution to the problem?

28. Reading Comprehension How are the dragons on Dragon Island personified?

30. Comprehension Check Read the article on page 197 of your practice book. Draw a line through the mistakes and write what really happened. Then rewrite the news article correctly.

31. Reading Skill: Folktales Fictional writing is categorized by certain genres. A genre is a type of writing. Each genre has certain properties: The type of story we will be reading this week is a folktale. A folktale is a cultural story that is passed down from word of mouth from generation to generation. Folktales often teach a lesson to children and have characters or events that are fantasy.

32. Reading Skill: Folktales How is a folktale different than other reading genres? http://www.mce.k12tn.net/indians/reading/what_is_a_folk_tale.htm http://www.virtualmuseum.ca/Exhibitions/Folklore/english/contese/contesintroe.htm http://teacher.scholastic.com/writewit/mff/folktale_allfolktale.htm

34. Folktale Characters United Streaming Enrichment

35. Comprehension Skill: Following Directions Following directions involves many things: Reading all directions carefully Understanding each step Gathering necessary materials Following each step in order

36. Practice Following Directions http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela4/a/writtendirectionsl.cfm http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela4/i/folloraldirp.cfm http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela4/i/folloraldirl.cfm

37. The Bones Brothers and the Frozen Fence By Carol Ottolenghi-Barga

38. Think about the Story How does the writer describe Slim and Leroy?

39. Think about the Story Why don’t Slim and Leroy want to build the fence in the usual way?

40. Think about the Story What steps to Slim and Leroy take to build the fence?

41. Understanding Genre What makes this story a folktale?

42. The Mysterious Giant of Barletta

43. giant mysterious pedestal square statue weakling

44. Vocabulary in Context There is an open square with a green lawn right in the middle of our little town.

45. Vocabulary in Context There you will find the stone statue of a man holding back a horse.

46. Vocabulary in Context The statue has a strange, mysterious look on his face.

47. Vocabulary in Context The pedestal of the statue has writing, although it is hard to read.

48. Vocabulary in Context The writing says the man had great strength and courage. Obviously he was not a weakling.

49. Vocabulary giant mysterious pedestal square statue weakling

50. Applying the Vocabulary

51. Using the Vocabulary There is an open _____ in the middle of town where people can meet. There, you will find a stone _____ of a man holding a huge hammer. The statue has a strange, _________ look on its face. The statue is so big that the man looks like a _________. The __________ under the statue has writing on it. The writing says that the man built our town and was a person of great strength, not a ________.

52. Independent Vocabulary Practice Complete the vocabulary chart on page 215 of your practice book.

53. The Mysterious Giant of Barletta

54. What makes this a Folktale? Word Splash Use the following words to explain why The Mysterious Giant of Barletta is a folktale: culture, fantasy, lesson, generations

55. Making Inferences Use story clues from page 351 and what you know to a complete the chart.

56. Reading Comprehension Is “mysterious” an appropriate description of the giant? Why or why not?

57. Reading Comprehension Why do you think the statue was placed in the town square?

58. Reading Comprehension What can you tell about Zia Concetta from her wordsa dnt he illustrations?

59. Reading Comprehension What can you conclude about life in Barletta at the beginning of the story?

60. Reading Comprehension Why is the statue so important to the people in the town before he comes to life?

61. Reading Comprehension Why is the last sentence on page 343 so important to the story? What has the author used to give the statue a human personality? How does this statement affect the realism of this story?

62. Reading Comprehension How do the townspeople react to the news of the approaching army? What does this tell you about their feelings?

63. Reading Comprehension Why does the author say that Zia Concetta and the giant “put their heads together”?

64. Reading Skill: Following Directions What were the directions in Zia Concetta’s plan? What words were used to help the townspeople follow the directions?

65. Reading Comprehension What is interesting about what the captain of the invading army first says to the giant?

66. Reading Comprehension Why aren’t Zia Concetta’s words “Our Giant did it!” completely true?

67. Reading Comprehension Why was it important for the townspeople to hide?

68. Reading Comprehension What was your favorite part of the story or the plan?

69. Comprehension Skill: Drawing Conclusions Whether you realize it or not, when we are reading we often are drawing conclusions. Drawing conclusions means using story details to figure out something that the author does not state directly. We can draw conclusions about a characters personality, feelings, and actions based on story clues, even when the author doesn’t explain the personality, feelings, and actions directly. We sometimes call this “reading between the lines”. Drawing conclusions is similar to making inferences.

70. Use clues to identify something that is not directly stated. Drawing Conclusions

71. Drawing Conclusions Use clues to identify something that is not directly stated.

72. Drawing Conclusions Use clues to identify something that is not directly stated.

73. Drawing Conclusions Use clues to identify something that is not directly stated.

74. Drawing Conclusions Use clues to identify something that is not directly stated.

75. Drawing Conclusions Use clues to identify something that is not directly stated.

76. Drawing Conclusions Use clues to identify something that is not directly stated.

77. Drawing Conclusions Use clues to identify something that is not directly stated.

78. Drawing Conclusions Use clues to identify something that is not directly stated.

79. Drawing Conclusions Use clues to identify something that is not directly stated.

80. How well did you draw conclusions? Love / Friendship War Family Vacation Ruined Wedding First Day of School Winning a Boxing Match Studying for Test Crying after Throwing Interception Watching a Parade Fighting

81. Practice Drawing Conclusions http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela4/e/drawconclusionsp.cfm http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela4/h/inferchar.cfm

82. Salt on a Bird’s Tail Adapted by Marianne Mitchell

83. Think about the Read Aloud Why does Olle want to put salt on the magpie’s tail? What can you tell about Olle from what he does to get the shiny knife? Why does the magpie ask Olle to get her the items that he wants himself?

84. Raising Dragons

85. Vocabulary in Context Our class went to a museum on Friday. We got to see how farmers long ago used to plow their fields before planting seeds.

86. Vocabulary in Context There were no tractors back then and farmers hitched their horses to a kind of curved blade that dug into the soil.

87. Vocabulary in Context After the seeds were sown, there was still plenty of work to do.

88. Vocabulary in Context The children on the farm had to help with the daily chores.

89. Vocabulary in Context For example they tended the gardens by weeding and watering them.

90. Vocabulary in Context In the fall the whole family harvested the food that they had grown.

91. Vocabulary in Context After working everyone had a huge appetite and would eat some of their newly harvested food.

92. Vocabulary appetite chores harvested hitched plow sown tended

93. Applying the Vocabulary

94. Vocabulary Sort Noun, verb, or adjective?

95. Independent Vocabulary Practice Complete the vocabulary chart on page 230 of your practice book.

96. Character Development The author shows a character’s personality through descriptions, dialogue, and his or her actions. What do we know about the girl in this story?

97. Reading Comprehension What does the girl know that makes her different than her parents?

98. Reading Comprehension What does her dad mean when he says, “I’m not too particular about fanciful creatures”?

99. Reading Comprehension Why do you think the girl decides to keep her thoughts to herself around her father?

100. Reading Comprehension Why does the father insist that the narrator stay away from the egg?

101. Reading Comprehension Why does the author describe the girl as waiting and wondering about the egg day after day?

102. Reading Comprehension Why is it important for Hank to keep him temper under control around the girl?

103. Reading Comprehension Why is knowing what the dragon eats important to the setting of this story?

104. Reading Comprehension Why doesn’t the girl’s mother want anything to do with Hank?

105. Reading Comprehension Why do the girl’s parents teach her to care for living animals? Why is this important to the story?

106. Reading Comprehension Why might Hank and the girl fly mainly at night?

107. Reading Comprehension What does it mean when the narrator said her mother felt “beholden” to Hank for saving her tomato plants?

108. Reading Comprehension Why might the narrator’s parents attitudes about Hank have changed?

109. Reading Comprehension What does the author mean when she writes “the crowds and attention decided his fate”?

110. Reading Comprehension How are the dragons on Dragon Island personified?

111. Reading Comprehension Have the characters’ personalities changed for the better throughout the story? How so?

113. Comprehension Skill: Story Structure How do good readers identify story elements in fiction? Every fictional story has certain elements, like ingredients. The characters are usually the most important element of the story. Characters can be people or animals. The setting is the time and place in which the story occurs. As we saw in Cliffhanger and Radio Rescue, weather can also be important to the setting. The plot of the story is the series of events that occur. The plot contains a problem and a solution. A story often has an author’s message. This is the lesson or idea the author wants you to learn.

114. United Streaming Enrichment Story Elements

115. The Mysterious Giant of Barletta Practice Applying Story Structure

117. Practice Identifying Story STructure http://www.brementownmusicians.com/flash/story/en http://pbskids.org/lions/stories/ http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/ http://www.readwritethink.org/lesson_images/lesson1043/fairy_tales.html

121. A Shed Full of Tigers Written by Irene N. Watts

122. Think about the Read Aloud Who are the characters in this story? Where and when does the story take place? What problem does Jaimie face? What does Jaimie do to solve the problem?

123. The Garden of Abdul Gasazi

124. Can you give an example of when or where you would use each word? awesome convinced disappeared discovered incredible impossible

125. Vocabulary in Context I am convinced that mystery stories are the very best kind of story.

126. Vocabulary in Context I just read a mystery about a boy that ran away from home and completely disappeared.

127. Vocabulary in Context At first the detective in the story that it would be impossible to find the boy.

128. Vocabulary in Context The detective followed the clues and finally discovered what happened.

129. Vocabulary in Context The detective thought it was incredible, but the boy had run away to school!

130. Vocabulary in Context When the boy was finally found, he was playing an awesome game of soccer with his friends.

131. Vocabulary awesome convinced disappeared discovered impossible incredible

132. Applying the Vocabulary

133. Vocabulary Sort Noun, verb, or adjective?

134. Independent Vocabulary Practice Complete the vocabulary chart on page 245 of your practice book.

135. Word Pyramid

136. Word Pyramid

137. Independent Vocabulary Practice Complete the story element chart on page 246 of your practice book.

138. Story Element Chart

139. Reading Comprehension How does Miss Hester feel about Fritz? How can you tell?

140. Reading Comprehension How seriously does Alan take his job? How can you tell?

141. Reading Comprehension Why might the author have included the detail about Alan’s hat on the first page?

142. Reading Comprehension Based on the first paragraph of page 400, how can you tell that Alan has no control over Fritz?

143. Reading Comprehension Why do you think the author capitalizes the words on the sign on page 400?

144. Reading Comprehension Is Alan doing the right thing by going into the garden after Fritz?

145. Reading Comprehension Why does the author describe Fritz as “barking with laughter”? What is this writing technique called?

146. Reading Comprehension Although Alan is bruised and tired, he continues to look for Fritz. How can we describe Alan’s personality?

147. Reading Comprehension How does the author create suspense on the last paragraph of page 402?

148. Reading Comprehension What details does the author use to make Mr. Gasazi seem frightening and mysterious?

149. Reading Comprehension Should Alan be blamed for losing Fritz? Explain your reasoning.

150. Reading Comprehension In what ways is this story similar to a dream?

151. Reading Comprehension What details show that Alan truly believes Fritz has been turned into a duck?

152. Reading Comprehension What is the significance of Alan saying to the duck, “You really haven’t changed so much”?

153. Reading Comprehension Why is the duck’s taking of Alan’s hat an important detail?

154. Reading Comprehension What clue does the author give that Miss Hester is not upset at Alan?

155. Reading Comprehension How might Miss Hester’s explanation of what happened be wrong?

156. Reading Comprehension What other emotions besides silly might Alan be feeling as he leaves Miss Hester’s house?

157. Reading Comprehension What can you conclude from the final sentence of the story?

158. Reading Comprehension How does this story compare to other fantasies?

159. Connecting & Comparing Literature We are going to be reading and comparing two stories in our theme, Incredible Stories. You will use the reading strategies and skills we have studied in this theme to analyze, understand, and compare these two stories: Fugitives on Four Legs and Dinosaur Bob

160. Paired Stories We will read two stories to prepare for our theme three tests. We will review and practice the following reading skills: Fantasy versus realism Personification Folktales Drawing Conclusions Story Structure

161. Fugitives on Four Legs

162. Vocabulary in Context Animals at the sanctuary can live safe from harm.

163. Vocabulary in Context In the wild, deer would be fleeing in fright from lions, tigers, and other enemies.

164. Vocabulary in Context Hippos like to wallow in mud near ponds.

165. Vocabulary in Context The young monkey ran off and climbed high into a tree. When he came back from his escapade his mother held him tightly in her lap.

166. Escape Vocabulary fleeing escapade sanctuary wallow

167. Applying the Vocabulary Complete the vocabulary chart on page 261 of your practice book.

169. Reading Comprehension What are these pigs like? How can you tell?

170. Reading Comprehension How does the writer feel about the pigs and their adventure? How does her writing show her feelings?

171. Reading Comprehension How is the pigs’ real adventure similar to Fritz’s fantasy adventure in The Mysterious Garden of Abdul Gasazi?

172. Reading Comprehension How can you tell that this is an example of non-fiction writing?

173. Reading Comprehension What would have happened to the pigs if they had not escaped?

174. Reading Comprehension The other stories in the selection are fantasy, but this one is non-fiction. Does that make the events in this story less incredible than the other stories?

175. Reading Comprehension How do the illustrations in this story compare to the illustrations in Dogzilla?

176. Dinosaur Bob And His Adventures with the Family Lazardo

177. Vocabulary in Context My grandparents once sailed on an ocean liner.

178. Vocabulary in Context Since it was their 50th anniversary, the waiters planned to serenade them at dinner.

179. Vocabulary in Context The waiters sang a Spanish rendition of my grandparents original wedding song.

180. Vocabulary in Context Luckily they took a cruise in June, so icebergs weren’t a menace to them.

181. Vocabulary in Context The cruise was like a safari because my grandparents had a chance to see many wild animals.

182. Vocabulary in Context On the ship my grandparents stayed in their own berth.

183. Travel Vocabulary safari rendition liner berth serenade menace

184. Applying the Vocabulary

186. Reading Comprehension Scotty said he “caught” Bob. Do you think this is accurate?

187. Reading Comprehension How is the plot of this story similar to the plot of Raising Dragons? How do the parents in the stories compare?

188. Reading Comprehension What do you think it would be like to see a huge dinosaur dance the Hokey Pokey?

189. Reading Comprehension Would you like to go on vacation with the Lazardos? Why or why not?

190. Reading Comprehension How is the way Bob acts different from the way Dogzilla acts? How is Bob like the dragon in Raising Dragons?

191. Reading Comprehension What details help show Bob’s huge size?

192. Reading Comprehension How do the Lazardo’s feel about Bob? How can you tell?

193. Reading Comprehension Is Bob happy with the Lazardos? How can you tell?

194. Reading Comprehension Is Bob’s size the only reason he is “the biggest show in town”?

195. Reading Comprehension How do the endings of Raising Dragons and Dinosaur Bob compare?

196. Comparing Two Stories

197. Time for Our Theme 3 Tests!

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