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Supervision and Evaluation – What’s New?!?. Dr. Jerry Goldberg http://teacherweb.com/ma/teachers21/jerrygoldberg. Pre-Assessment. John Hattie – Visible Learning for Teachers. What has the highest impact on student achievement?. Welcome/Pre-Assessment/Readings

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Supervision and evaluation what s new

Supervision and Evaluation –What’s New?!?

Dr. Jerry Goldberg

http://teacherweb.com/ma/teachers21/jerrygoldberg


Pre assessment
Pre-Assessment

John Hattie – Visible Learning for Teachers

What has the highest impact on student achievement?


  • Welcome/Pre-Assessment/Readings

  • Trust – Building a Culture of Trust

  • DESE Standards and Indicators of Effective Teacher Practice

  • Unpacking the Standards and Using the RUBRICS

  • Weston rubrics

  • Putting it to work

  • Questions – Answers – Next Steps

AGENDA


Pre assessment answers
Pre-Assessment - Answers

  • Today, we will discuss several of the “high” impact contributors to student achievement.

  • See page for the answers.


Trust an essential ingredient in the supervisory process
TRUST….an essential ingredient in the supervisory process

What is the nature of your conversations about student learning in your school?

How does this impact the culture and climate in your school?

  • Interpersonal dimensions:

    • Personal relationship building

    • Effective listening

    • Open and honest communication

    • Authenticity

    • Caring for the welfare of others

  • Cognitive dimensions:

    • There is a real and complex knowledge base about teaching

    • Performance is best characterized by patterns of behavior rather than discrete easily defined moments or activities

    • My supervisory work is aimed at expanding our repertoires and stimulating our thinking because we all have room to grow and learn

    • If I see something that I am uncomfortable with or don’t understand, I will share my concerns or questions directly with you ( you won’t have to guess what is on my mind)


Success
??? Success ???

  • How do you measure your success -above and beyond raising student performance levels?

  • How do you want others to measure your success?


Relational trust bryk schneider the climate that affects adults
Relational Trust - Bryk & SchneiderThe climate that affects adults

Now, tell your colleagues something that you struggle with in your job. Again, be factual – don’t be reluctant to share!

Tell your colleagues something that you do very well in your job. Don’t be shy – be factual!

  • Teachers in this school trust each other

  • It’s okay in this school to discuss feelings, worries, and frustrations with other teachers

  • Teachers respect other teachers who take the lead in school improvement efforts

  • Teachers at the school respect those colleagues who are expert at their craft

  • Teachers feel respected by other teachers


Teacher principal items
Teacher-Principal Items

  • Teachers in this school are evaluated fairly

  • Staff are supported and encouraged in this school

  • The principal lets staff members know what is expected of them

  • Too often, decisions made by staff committees are ignored or reversed by building administrators

  • The principal does a good job of getting resources for this school

  • The administration and teaching staff collaborate toward making the school run effectively

  • I feel comfortable voicing my concerns in this school

    Trust in Schools, Bryk and Scheider, 2002


Overarching questions
Overarching Questions

  • As leaders, how can we influence teacher quality?

  • As leaders, how can we work together to improve supervision and evaluation?


Charlotte danielson
Charlotte Danielson…

  • Levels of performance describe how a teacher's practice progresses from inexperienced and inexpert to experienced and expert. With respect to the standards of practice, it's not that teachers either do them or don't do them—it's that they do them well or poorly. The levels of performance describe that continuum.



Definitions of ratings
Definitions of Ratings

  • Exemplaryshall mean that the educator’s performance consistently and significantly exceeds the requirements of a standard or overall and the educator can model the experience.

  • Proficientshall mean that the educator’s performance fully and consistently meets the requirements of a standard or overall.

  • Needs improvement shall mean that the educator’s performance on a standard or overall is below the requirements of a standard or overall, but is not considered to be unsatisfactory at this time. Improvement is necessary and expected.

  • Unsatisfactoryshall mean that the educator’s performance on a standard or overall has not significantly improved following a rating of needs improvement, or the educator’s performance is consistently below the requirements of a standard or overall and is considered inadequate, or both.



Effective Teaching = Student Learning

We all agree that the ultimate measure of effective teaching

is student learning..

The challenge is, how do we measure student learning in all its dimensions?


Essential building blocks of effective supervision and evaluation
Essential Building Blocks of Effective Supervision and Evaluation

  • COMMON LANGUAGEand a concept system for talking about teaching

  • PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Criteria for effective teaching that are published and understood by all

  • TIMELINESS AND FAIRNESS: Timely feedback that is fair, i.e., all claims are based on evidence.

  • SYSTEMATIC SUPPORT OF SUPERVISORS (SOS)…one pair of eyes and ears will often not yield the richness of thinking required in complex cases


Fundamentals of walk throughs
Fundamentals of Walk Throughs

  • Short focused yet informal observation

  • Possible areas for reflection

  • Curriculum as well as instructional focus

  • Follow-up occurs only on occasion and not after every visit

  • Informal and collaborative

  • Required in the new DESE Standards and Indicators of Effective Teaching Practice


Mbwa research results the why
MBWA Research Results – the WHY

  • Increased teacher satisfaction and a higher frequency of flow experiences.

  • Improved teacher self-efficacy

  • Improved teacher attitudes towards Professional Development

  • Improved teacher attitudes towards formal evaluation process

  • Increased teacher perception of efficacy of staff and school

  • Improved classroom instruction

  • Improved teacher perception of principal effectiveness

  • Improved student discipline

  • Improved teacher-perceived effectiveness of the school

  • Increased student learning across socioeconomic and cultural lines


Mbwa research results downey steffy english frase poston
MBWA Research ResultsDowney, Steffy, English, Frase, & Poston

Increased teacher satisfaction and a higher frequency of flow experiences.

What is flow in this context?


Csikszentmihalyi flow the psychology of optimal experience

FLOW

Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience

  • The most satisfying and motivating experience a person can have

  • Deep, intense involvement

  • Fully absorbed in activity

  • “Being completely involved in an activity for its own sake. The ego falls away. Time flies. Every action, movement, and thought follows inevitably from the previous one, like playing jazz.”

  • Challenges but doesn’t overwhelm one’s skills

  • Feelings of competence and satisfaction

  • A feeling of using one’s skills to the utmost


Mbwa research results
MBWA Research Results

Increased teacher satisfaction and a higher frequency of flow experiences

Improved teacher self-efficacy


Downey s five step walk through observation structure
Downey’s Five-Step Walk-Through Observation Structure

  • Student Orientation to Work

  • Curricular Decision Points

  • Instructional Decision Points

  • “Walk-the-Walls”: Curricular and Instructional Decision Points

  • Safety and Health Issues

    Downey et al. The Three-Minute Classroom Walk-Through, 2004.


Practicing walk throughs
Practicing Walk Throughs

Applying Downey’s 5 Steps…

What can you observe during a brief walk- through?


Advantages of frequent walk throughs downey steffy english frase poston
Advantages of Frequent Walk-Throughs - Downey, Steffy, English, Frase & Poston

  • Greater validity to what is observed

  • Often lowers teacher apprehension over time, making formal observations more effective

  • The more you know about how people are functioning & making decisions, the more you know about the school’s operation

  • The more you observe the more you learn and the greater repertoire of strategies you can share with other staff

  • Can identify common areas that would be valuable for group staff development (entire staff, grade level group, department)

  • Can observe effectiveness of staff development endeavors in the classroom

  • Helps identify possible individuals who might become marginal if not provided with assistance quickly

  • Provides perspective

Which are most important for your school’s current needs?


Can walk throughs be supervisory as well as evaluative
Can Walk-throughs be Supervisory as well as Evaluative?

YES!

The answer is:

  • An example:

    • The principal requires that all teachers post the agenda and the student objective (in “kid” language) for each lesson.

    • Mr. Jones does not post either as determined by 3 walk-through visits by the principal.

    • What might you do?


Avoid turning walk throughs into another meaningless fad
Avoid turning walk-throughs into another meaningless fad!

"Wow! If we learn from our mistakes,

I ought to be a genius by now."



caution:

use your

emotional

intelligence


  • caution:

  • - monitor frequency

  • - draw conclusions

  • carefully


  • caution:

  • - nurture PLC culture

  • - take care with

  • feedback

  • - explicitly link walk

  • throughs to

  • group learning


  • caution:

  • - adjust actions

  • based on current

  • stage


Commit yourself to the process!

Think about how you will begin - do not just visit every classroom every day without building a foundation for Walk-Throughs that Count!


Remember…

“The real methodology for system change begins and ends with ongoing, authentic conversations about important questions.” Tony Wagner


Calibration
Calibration

  • Do we all see the same thing at the same level?

  • What are the “look fors”?

  • What are appropriate measures of evidence?

  • How much does each piece of evidence count toward the rating?

  • What counts more or less?

  • What are the artifacts and do they count?

  • How timely must the response be?

  • How do we help teachers set SMART goals?


Calibration1
Calibration

  • Because the levels of performance describe a teacher's skill in the various aspects of teaching, it's essential that observers be able to distinguish one level from the next. This, in turn, makes it more likely that any two trained observers will agree with each other. This is first a matter of clarity of language; the language used in the different levels should permit focused training for observers so their levels of agreement and accuracy are high.

  • Charlotte Danielson


ASK

Standard I: Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment. The teacher promotes the learning and growth of all students by providing high-quality and coherent instruction, designing and administering authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyzing student performance and growth data, using this data to improve instruction, providing students with constructive feedback on an ongoing basis, and continuously refining learning objectives.

  • To what degree are students learning important Understandings, Facts, and Skills and how do we know (assessment)?


ASK

Standard II: Teaching All Students. The teacher promotes the learning and growth of all students through instructional practices that establish high expectations, create a safe and effective classroom environment, and demonstrate cultural proficiency.

  • To what degree are students sufficiently engaged in and invested in learning? (the purpose of pedagogy (aka TEACHING all students) is to build and nurture investment in learning).


ASK

Standard III: Family and Community Engagement. The teacher promotes the learning and growth of all students through effective partnerships with families, caregivers, community members, and organizations.

  • What is the quality of the relationships we have with parents/guardians?


ASK

Standard IV: Professional Culture. The teacher promotes the learning and growth of all students through ethical, culturally proficient, skilled, and collaborative practice.

  • What is the state of trust, collaboration, and psychological safety at our school ?


Some rubrics use the language of frequency; teachers do a certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons, the language in the different levels of performance must be qualitatively, not quantitatively, different. For instance, in the example cited, learning tasks at the proficient level are "designed to challenge student thinking" whereas those at the basic level "require only minimal thinking by students." These are qualitative differences.

Charlotte Danielson


Watch and write
Watch and Write certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons

  • What should we consider before sending to the teacher our reactions to the classroom visit?

  • What might a teacher learn from our comments?

  • How can I follow-up, if necessary?

  • CEIJ - Claims, Evidence, Interpretation, Judgment – what role does each play in what we convey?

  • Let’s compose a response to the teacher in the video…

high school math


The macro
The Macro certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons


The micro
The Micro certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons

  • High leverage elements


3 categories of evidence will be used in every district s educator evaluation system
3 Categories of certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessonsEvidence will be used in every district’s educator evaluation system:

  • Multiple measures of student learning, growth and achievement, including

    • progress toward learning targets

    • MCAS growth measures in comparison to comparable schools, based on appropriate school-level demographics, where applicable, and

    • measures of learning comparable across grade or subject district-wide

  • Judgments based on observation and artifacts of professional practice, using a DESE-approved observation system

  • Collection of additional evidence relevant to one or more Standards, documenting fulfillment of other areas of professional responsibilities and growth as well as contributions to the school community and the professional culture.


Big idea
Big Idea certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons

  • Teacher effectiveness must be linked to student learning

  • Moving our “sensors” so that data about learning as well as teaching can be collected


Evidence that determines overall ratings

Multiple Measures of Student Learning certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons

Evidence That Determines Overall Ratings

other evidence relevant to one or more standards

multiple

measures

of student

learning, growth,

and

achievement

judgments-based on observations & artifacts of practice


Watch and write1
Watch and Write certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons

  • Emails are a quick and easy way for communicating.

  • What should we consider before emailing our reactions to a classroom visit?

  • What might a teacher learn from our comments?

  • How can I follow-up, if necessary?

  • CEIJ - Claims, Evidence, Interpretation, Judgment – what role does each play in what we convey?

  • Let’s write an email to this teacher…


Downey’s Five-Step Walk-Through certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons

Observation Structure

  • 1. Student Orientation to Work

  • Curricular Decision Points

  • Instruction Decision Points

  • 4. “Walk-the-Walls”

  • 5. Safety and Health Issues

Downey et al. The Three-Minute Classroom Walk-Through, 2004.


Safety and health issues
Safety and Health Issues certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons

  • Where do we find reference to this in the Standards?

  • What are the “look-fors” in this area?

  • High school genetics class…


Let’s practice… certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons


Watch and write revisited
Watch and Write - Revisited certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons

  • What should we consider before emailing our reactions to this classroom visit?

  • What might the teacher learn from our comments?

  • How can I follow-up, if necessary?

  • CEIJ - Claims, Evidence, Interpretation, Judgment – what role does each play in what we convey?

  • Let’s write an email to this teacher…


Collaborative Conversations - Downey certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons

  • Shifting from “Gotcha” to Collaborative Conversations that promote professional reflection and growth.

  • Brainstorm a list of words and phrases that you would like staff to use to describe conversations with you that promote their professional growth.


  • FOCUS: certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons What do you want the teacher to think about in terms of practice?

    • Situation or condition

      • When you are teaching and asking questions…

    • Response (thinking about teaching practice)

      • …and thinking about when to provide wait time and how much time to give… 

    • Criteria

      • …what kinds of thoughts go through your mind about the criteria you’ll use…

    • Decision

      • …to make those wait time decisions…

    • Student impact

      • …to provide each student the opportunity to learn the objective?

Developing Reflective Questions


Compare these two questioning approaches certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons

  • What is the impact of asking the question each way ?

    • A.

    • “What strategies are you using for checking for understanding?”

    • B.

    • 1.) “When you are planning your lessons…

    • 2.) and you are thinking about how you’ll check to see how the kids are learning and the many techniques you can use to check for understanding…

    • 3.) what thoughts go through your mind about the kind of criteria you’ll use…

    • 4.) to help you choose the technique you’ll use…

    • 5.) to see what your kids understand and where to go next in your teaching?”


Practicing Reflective Questions certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons

1. SITUATION OR CONDITION (e.g. When you are teaching and asking questions…)

2. RESPONSE (e.g. …and thinking about when to provide wait time and how much time to give…)

3. CRITERIA (e.g. …what thoughts go through your mind about the criteria you’ll use…)

4. DECISION (e.g. …to make those wait time decisions…)

5. STUDENT IMPACT (e.g. …to provide each student with the opportunity to learn the objective?”)


Watch and write revisited1
Watch and Write - Revisited certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons

  • What should we consider before emailing our reactions to this classroom visit?

  • What might the teacher learn from our comments?

  • How can I follow-up, if necessary?

  • CEIJ - Claims, Evidence, Interpretation, Judgment – what role does each play in what we convey?

  • Let’s write an email to this teacher…


Overarching questions1
Overarching Questions certain thing "never," "occasionally," "frequently," or "always." This language suggests that an evaluator can observe the same teacher multiple times; it's not suitable for a single observation of teaching. For rubrics to apply to individual lessons

  • As leaders, how can we influence teacher quality?

  • How can school leaders work together to improve supervision and evaluation?


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