Teacher Recruitment and Retention:  Two Great Practices That Work

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Teacher Recruitment and Retention: Two Great Practices That Work

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1. Teacher Recruitment and Retention: Two Great Practices That Work Michelle Dunkle Program Manager for Alternative Preparation Programs Maryland State Department of Education

3. Questions: How does a state build its teacher pool without sacrificing what it believes to be quality and integrity in the training of teachers? What do school systems want most in teachers produced by training of “quality and integrity”? Do current traditional training programs produce those system-desired qualities in teachers? If so, can we develop alternative pathways to teaching that replicate the same outcomes as those programs? How will we know if we’re successful?

4. School Systems Needs are Simple Effective teachers Teachers who stay

5. At the Core of Teacher Education in Maryland since 1995 Strong Academic Content Extended and supervised field experience Performance Assessment Linkage with P-12 priorities

6. Background and Context Emphasis on extended and specially designed clinical experiences for teachers dates back to 1980s. Carnegie Forum, 1986 Goodlad, 1990; Holmes Group, 1986 Takes local shape through Maryland’s Teacher Education Task Force Report of 1995, commonly known as the Redesign of Teacher Education in Maryland.

7. Professional Development Schools in Maryland MSDE began requiring PDS training for all undergraduate teacher education candidates in 1999; began using finalized and tested PDS Standards and Guidelines as integral part of Program Approval/NCATE process; and, collecting data as a result of 2004 PDS Study requested by State Superintendent of Schools Dr. Nancy Grasmick and then Acting Secretary of Higher Education.

8. PDS Data Collection on Retention Towson University Study

9. PDS Data Collection on Retention Prince George’s County Public Schools

10. Documenting PDS-Trained Teacher Performance This work has just begun, but there are promising beginnings: A principal publicly credited his PDS relationship with a university in aiding his school in moving from “watch” list to a top performer in his county. A superintendent credited PDS association with another university for 15% to 70% improvement in Maryland School Assessment scores in PDS schools compared to 3% to 37% improvement in non-PDS schools in his system.

11. Documenting PDS-Trained Teacher Performance Teacher Preparation Improvement Plan of December 2007 reports positive quantitative results from numerous projects evidenced by results from pre- and post-testing. The effort continues to document the work of PDS. (As a result of data collected on PDS retention, PDS has been funded since 2006 through the governor’s budget.)

13. Ultimate Goal To use MARCO project as a springboard for statewide program development for alternatively preparing teachers of quality. To build a system known as Maryland Approved Alternative Preparation Programs (MAAPP) that would have program providers utilize the same standards as non-alternative teacher education programs, and subsequently build an accountability structure.

15. What do data show about MARCO teachers? Retention is very promising. Principal satisfaction is high. Mentoring and program alignment are critical to how teachers faced the first year of teaching

16. MARCO Retention

17. MARCO Teacher Performance Data

18. MARCO Teacher Performance Data

19. Eight “Troops to Teachers” Pilot Projects Data

20. Eight “Troops to Teachers” Pilot Projects Data

21. The Redesign may provide the answer to why both seem to be successful….. PDS training is performance-based, linked to PreK-12 priorities, provides an extensive supervised full-time teaching experience and requires evidence of strong content knowledge. Maryland Approved Alternative Preparation Program training is performance-based, linked to PreK-12 priorities, provides an extensive supervised full-time teaching experience and requires evidence of strong content knowledge.

22. What do we know? Teachers trained in Professional Development Schools (PDS) tend to remain teaching in Maryland for longer periods of time than those not trained in PDS. Teachers trained in Maryland Approved Alternative Preparation Programs may dramatically exceed the average retention rates of the school system in which they are first hired.

23. What do we we know? Professional Development Schools (PDS) are viewed by many superintendents and principals as assets to the school community, and may lead to increased PreK-12 student achievement Teachers trained in Maryland Approved Alternative Preparation Programs tend to perform at least as well as other first year teachers.

24. Current Status of Alternate Pathways Programs 19 programs, partnerships including 5 four-year colleges/universities 4 community colleges 10 local school systems 2 private providers Draft Standards of Practice under review Developed by members of all stakeholder groups Will be used as part of ongoing program approval following pilot process Online yearly data collection systems will be piloted next year

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