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Promoting Integrity in the Next Generation of Researchers. A Curriculum for Responsible Conduct of Research in Occupational Therapy (2005) Funded by the Office of Research Integrity through the American Association of Medical Colleges. Mentorship . Objectives. Define mentor .

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promoting integrity in the next generation of researchers

Promoting Integrity in theNext Generation of Researchers

A Curriculum for Responsible Conduct of Research in Occupational Therapy (2005)

Funded by the Office of Research Integrity through the

American Association of Medical Colleges

objectives
Objectives
  • Define mentor.
  • Describe the roles and the responsibilities of a mentor and a person being mentored.
  • Feel empowered to prevent or address mentoring issues.
definition
Definition
  • A mentor is a person who serves as “a trusted counselor or teacher, especially in occupational settings”

(American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 3rd ed., 1992. pg. 1128)

  • A mentor is “someone who will not rest until you are all that you can be” Source Unknown
a mentor acts as a
A Mentor Acts as a
  • Role model
  • Colleague
  • Guide
  • Teacher
  • Advisor
  • Cheerleader

(Magnus and Kalichman, 2002)

mentors
Mentors
  • Help develop a student as a researcher
  • Help prepare a student for the job market
  • Help a student develop professional understanding of “political, ethical, economic, and social dynamics”

(Magnus and Kalichman, 2002)

mentors guide by
Mentors Guide by
  • Example (implicit instruction)
  • Informal discussion (problem solving)
  • Formal education
  • Editing written and oral work
  • Providing opportunities for growth
  • Personal involvement

They do not make decisions for the student, they help the study act “on their own values, goals, and experience.”

(Magnus and Kalichman, 2004)

students should seek multiple mentors to help develop different professional areas
Students Should Seek Multiple Mentors to Help Develop Different Professional Areas
  • Clinical mentor
  • Research mentor
  • Supervision/Administrative mentor
  • Teaching mentor
  • Political mentor
  • Service mentor
creating a mentored relationship
Creating a Mentored Relationship
  • Get to know your potential mentor before negotiating mentorship
  • Explicitly negotiate a mentored relationship
    • Define the personal and professional goals
    • Discuss expectations re. time, types of contact, types of work, duration of commitment
    • Clarify the style and boundaries of the relationship
    • Discuss data ownership, intellectual property, and authorship plans
  • Respect personality differences
conflicting roles
Conflicting Roles
  • Mentors may serve several formal and informal roles
  • Conflicting roles of teacher, advisor, employer, counselor, colleague and friend can lead to conflicts of interest

(King, 2003)

  • Control and avoid conflicts by
    • Maintaining open communication
    • Resolving issues as they arise
    • Remembering that mentorship is a gift, with focus on student. Benefit to mentor is incidental
resources
Resources
  • American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (3rd ed.). (1992). Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
  • King, M.F. (2003). On the right track: A manual for research mentors. Washington D.C.: Council of Graduate Schools.
  • Magnus, P., & Kalichman, M. (2002, September). Mentoring. Retrieved September 9, 2005, from RCR Education Resources, Online Resource for RCR Instructors: http://rcrec.sdsc.edu/r/index.php?module=ContentExpress&file=index&func=display&ceid=46&meid=80.
  • Shamoo, A. E., & Resnik, D. B. (2003). Responsible conduct of research. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Rackham Graduate School, University of Michigan. How to get the mentoring you want: A guide for graduate students at a diverse university. Ann Arbor: Author. Retrieved September 9, 2005, from http://www.rackham.umich.edu/StudentInfo/Publications/StudentMentoring/contents.html.
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