Supporting standards comprise 35% of the U. S. History Test
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Supporting standards comprise 35% of the U. S. History Test 17 (D) PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Supporting standards comprise 35% of the U. S. History Test 17 (D). Supporting Standard (17) The student understands the economic effects of World War II & the Cold War. The Student is expected to:

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Supporting standards comprise 35% of the U. S. History Test 17 (D)

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Supporting standards comprise 35 of the u s history test 17 d

Supporting standards comprise 35% of the U. S. History Test

17 (D)


Supporting standard 17 the student understands the economic effects of world war ii the cold war

Supporting Standard (17)The student understands the economic effects of World War II & the Cold War.

The Student is expected to:

(D) Identify actions of government & the private sector such as the Great Society, affirmative action, & Title IX to create economic opportunities for citizens & analyze the unintended consequences of each


Supporting standard 17 the student understands the economic effects of world war ii the cold war1

Supporting Standard (17)The student understands the economic effects of World War II & the Cold War.

The Student is expected to:

(D) Identify actions of government & the private sector such as the Great Society, analyze the unintended consequences


Supporting standards comprise 35 of the u s history test 17 d

The Great Society was a set of domestic programs in the United States first announced by President Lyndon B. Johnson at Ohio University, then at University of Michigan, and subsequently promoted by him and fellow Democrats in Congress in the 1960s. Two main goals of the Great Society social reforms were the elimination of poverty and racial injustice. New major spending programs that addressed education, medical care, urban problems, and transportation were launched during this period. The Great Society in scope and sweep resembled the New Deal domestic agenda of Franklin D. Roosevelt.

The Great Society was a set of domestic programs in the United States first announced by President Lyndon B. Johnson at Ohio University, then at University of Michigan, and subsequently promoted by him and fellow Democrats in Congress in the 1960s. Two main goals of the Great Society social reforms were the elimination of poverty and racial injustice. New major spending programs that addressed education, medical care, urban problems, and transportation were launched during this period. The Great Society in scope and sweep resembled the New Deal domestic agenda of Franklin D. Roosevelt.


Supporting standards comprise 35 of the u s history test 17 d

In 1965, the first session of the Eighty-ninth Congress created the core of the Great Society. The new Congress began by enacting long-stalled legislation such as Medicare and federal aid to education and then moved into other areas, including high-speed mass transit, rental supplements, truth in packaging, environmental safety legislation, new provisions for mental health facilities, a teachers’ corps, manpower training, Operation Headstart, aid to urban mass transit, a demonstration cities program, a housing act that included rental subsidies, and an act for higher education. The Johnson Administration submitted eighty-seven bills to Congress, and Johnson signed eighty-four, or 96%, arguably the most successful legislative agenda in U.S. Congressional history.

In 1965, the first session of the Eighty-ninth Congress created the core of the Great Society. The new Congress began by enacting long-stalled legislation such as Medicare and federal aid to education and then moved into other areas, including high-speed mass transit, rental supplements, truth in packaging, environmental safety legislation, new provisions for mental health facilities, a teachers’ corps, manpower training, Operation Headstart, aid to urban mass transit, a demonstration cities program, a housing act that included rental subsidies, and an act for higher education. The Johnson Administration submitted eighty-seven bills to Congress, and Johnson signed eighty-four, or 96%, arguably the most successful legislative agenda in U.S. Congressional history.


Supporting standards comprise 35 of the u s history test 17 d

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 assured minority registration and voting. It suspended use of literacy or other voter-qualification tests that had sometimes served to keep African-Americans off voting lists and provided for federal court lawsuits to stop discriminatory poll taxes. It also reinforced the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by authorizing the appointment of federal voting examiners in areas that did not meet voter-participation requirements. The Immigration and Nationality Service Act of 1965 abolished the national-origin quotas in immigration law. The Civil Acts of 1968 banned housing discrimination and extended constitutional protections to Native Americans on reservations.

President Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act of 1965

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 assured minority registration and voting. It suspended use of literacy or other voter-qualification tests that had sometimes served to keep African-Americans off voting lists and provided for federal court lawsuits to stop discriminatory poll taxes. It also reinforced the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by authorizing the appointment of federal voting examiners in areas that did not meet voter-participation requirements. The Immigration and Nationality Service Act of 1965 abolished the national-origin quotas in immigration law. The Civil Acts of 1968 banned housing discrimination and extended constitutional protections to Native Americans on reservations.


War on poverty

LBJ signing the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964

War on Poverty

The most ambitious and controversial part of the Great Society was its initiative to end poverty. The Kennedy Administration had been contemplating a federal effort against poverty. Johnson, who, as a teacher had observed extreme poverty in Texas among Mexican-Americans, launched an “unconditional war on poverty” in the first months of his presidency with the goal of eliminating hunger and deprivation from American life. The centerpiece of the War on Poverty was the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, which created an Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) to oversee a variety of community-based antipoverty programs. The War on Poverty began with a $1 billion appropriation in 1964 and spent another $2 billion in the following two years.

The most ambitious and controversial part of the Great Society was its initiative to end poverty. The Kennedy Administration had been contemplating a federal effort against poverty. Johnson, who, as a teacher had observed extreme poverty in Texas among Mexican-Americans, launched an “unconditional war on poverty” in the first months of his presidency with the goal of eliminating hunger and deprivation from American life. The centerpiece of the War on Poverty was the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, which created an Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) to oversee a variety of community-based antipoverty programs. The War on Poverty began with a $1 billion appropriation in 1964 and spent another $2 billion in the following two years.


Supporting standard 17 the student understands the economic effects of world war ii the cold war2

Supporting Standard (17)The student understands the economic effects of World War II & the Cold War.

The Student is expected to:

(D) 2 Identify actions of government & the private sector such as affirmative action to create economic opportunities for citizens & analyze the unintended consequences


Supporting standards comprise 35 of the u s history test 17 d

Affirmative action or positive discrimination (known as employment equity in Canada, and positive action in the UK) is the policy of providing special opportunities for, and favoring members of, a disadvantaged group who suffer discrimination. The concept of affirmative action was introduced in the early 1960s in the United States, as a way to combat racial discrimination in the hiring process and, in 1967, the concept was expanded to include sex. The principle of affirmative action is to promote societal equality through the preferential treatment of socioeconomically disadvantaged people. Often, these people are disadvantaged for historical reasons, such as oppression or slavery.

Affirmative action or positive discrimination (known as employment equity in Canada, and positive action in the UK) is the policy of providing special opportunities for, and favoring members of, a disadvantaged group who suffer discrimination. The concept of affirmative action was introduced in the early 1960s in the United States, as a way to combat racial discrimination in the hiring process and, in 1967, the concept was expanded to include sex. The principle of affirmative action is to promote societal equality through the preferential treatment of socioeconomically disadvantaged people. Often, these people are disadvantaged for historical reasons, such as oppression or slavery.


Supporting standard 17 the student understands the economic effects of world war ii the cold war3

Supporting Standard (17)The student understands the economic effects of World War II & the Cold War.

The Student is expected to:

(D) 3 Identify actions of government & the private sector such as Title IX to create economic opportunities for citizens & analyze the unintended consequences


Supporting standards comprise 35 of the u s history test 17 d

Title IX is a portion of the Education Amendments of 1972, Public Law No. 92‑318, 86 Stat. 235 (June 23, 1972), codified at 20 U.S.C. sections 1681 through 1688, co-authored and introduced by Senator Birch Bayh; it was renamed the Patsy Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act in 2002, after its House co-author and sponsor. It states (in part) that: No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.

Title IX is a portion of the Education Amendments of 1972, Public Law No. 92‑318, 86 Stat. 235 (June 23, 1972), codified at 20 U.S.C. sections 1681 through 1688, co-authored and introduced by Senator Birch Bayh; it was renamed the Patsy Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act in 2002, after its House co-author and sponsor. It states (in part) that: No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.


Supporting standards comprise 35 of the u s history test 17 d

Senator Bayh exercises with Title IX athletes at Purdue University, ca. 1970s.

Title IX is best known for its impact on high school and college athletics, the original statute made no explicit mention of sports. Title IX became law on June 23, 1972. President Nixon signed the bill.

Applicability and compliance

The legislation covers all educational activities, and complaints under Title IX alleging sex discrimination in fields such as science or math education, or in other aspects of academic life such as access to health care and dormitory facilities, are not unheard of. It also applies to non-sport activities such as school band and clubs; however, social fraternities & social sororities, sex-specific youth clubs such as Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts, and Girls State & Boys State are specifically exempt from Title IX requirements.

Title IX is best known for its impact on high school and college athletics, the original statute made no explicit mention of sports. Title IX became law on June 23, 1972. President Nixon signed the bill.

Applicability and compliance

The legislation covers all educational activities, and complaints under Title IX alleging sex discrimination in fields such as science or math education, or in other aspects of academic life such as access to health care and dormitory facilities, are not unheard of. It also applies to non-sport activities such as school band and clubs; however, social fraternities & social sororities, sex-specific youth clubs such as Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts, and Girls State & Boys State are specifically exempt from Title IX requirements.


Supporting standards comprise 35 of the u s history test 17 d

Unequal aggregate expenditures for members of each sex or unequal expenditures for male and female teams if a recipient operates or sponsors separate teams will not constitute noncompliance with this section, but the Assistant Secretary [of Education for Civil Rights] may consider the failure to provide necessary funds for teams for one sex in assessing equality of opportunity for members of each sex. Health Education & Welfare’s 1979 Policy Interpretation articulated three ways compliance with Title IX can be achieved. This became known as the “three-part test” for compliance. A recipient of federal funds can demonstrate compliance with Title IX by meeting any one of the three prongs.

Unequal aggregate expenditures for members of each sex or unequal expenditures for male and female teams if a recipient operates or sponsors separate teams will not constitute noncompliance with this section, but the Assistant Secretary [of Education for Civil Rights] may consider the failure to provide necessary funds for teams for one sex in assessing equality of opportunity for members of each sex. Health Education & Welfare’s 1979 Policy Interpretation articulated three ways compliance with Title IX can be achieved. This became known as the “three-part test” for compliance. A recipient of federal funds can demonstrate compliance with Title IX by meeting any one of the three prongs.


Supporting standards comprise 35 of the u s history test 17 d

Title IX applies to an entire school or institution if any part of that school receives federal funds; hence, athletic programs are subject to Title IX, even though there is very little direct federal funding of school sports.

The Department of Education evaluates the following factors in determining whether equal treatment exists:

1. Whether the selection of sports and levels of competition effectively accommodate the interests and abilities of members of both sexes;

2. The provision of equipment and supplies;

3. Scheduling of games and practice time;

4. Travel and per diem allowance;

5. Opportunity to receive coaching and academic tutoring on mathematics only;

6. Assignment and compensation of coaches and tutors;

7. Provision of locker rooms, practice and competitive facilities;

8. Provision of medical and training facilities and services;

9. Provision of housing and dining facilities and services;

10. Publicity


Supporting standards comprise 35 of the u s history test 17 d

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