Critical essay masterclass
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 26

Critical Essay Masterclass PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 74 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Critical Essay Masterclass. Ms Nitsche. Success Criteria. What makes a good essay? Good analysis – detail, relevant to question Good evidence – description of scene/shot/technique, relevant to question, able to analyse in depth. Topic sentences

Download Presentation

Critical Essay Masterclass

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Critical essay masterclass

Critical Essay Masterclass

Ms Nitsche


Success criteria

Success Criteria

What makes a good essay?

Good analysis – detail, relevant to question

Good evidence – description of scene/shot/technique, relevant to question, able to analyse in depth.

Topic sentences

Technical accuracy – punctuation, spelling, paragraphs, phrasing, capitals.

Flows well – connectives/linking language, order of techniques/scenes.

Wide vocabulary

REFER TO QUESTION!


How to make sure you answer the question

How to Make Sure You Answer the Question

  • First of all, read the question carefully TWICE.

  • Sounds simple, but you wouldn’t believe how many people misread the question and answer based on what they THINK it asks them rather than what it actually does.

  • Secondly, pick out KEY WORDS from the question – note these down and try to think of alternative language/synonyms for them.

  • By having this language in your topic sentence and evaluation, you ensure you refer to the question.

  • By thinking of synonyms for the key words, you ensure your language and vocabulary is varied (nothing worse than a boring, repetitive essay)


Sample essay questions

Sample Essay Questions

  • Choose a novel or a short story or a work of non-fiction which explores an important theme.

  • By referring to appropriate techniques, show how the author has explored this theme.

  • Choose a novel or a short story in which the author creates a fascinating character.

  • By referring to appropriate techniques, show how the author has created this character and why you found him/her so fascinating.

    PICK OUT THE KEY WORDS FROM THESE QUESTIONS


Introduction

Introduction

  • Start with TART

  • (Title, Author, Refer to Task)

  • You should also give a BRIEF outline of the story.

    Now, write your own introduction.

    YOU HAVE TEN MINUTES


Example

Example

‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ by Harper Lee explores the prejudice surrounding a small Southern community in the 1930s. Lee’s use of imagery, juxtaposition and exploration of morality highlights the racial tensions present in the USA at this time, and emphasises the part prejudice plays in everyday human nature.


Point

Point

  • The Point is simply what each paragraph is about- you make a main point in every paragraph you write. This is usually the TOPIC SENTENCE you use.

  • Do not signpost your paragraph e.g. do not say “I am going to talk about”


What is a topic sentence

What is a TOPIC SENTENCE?

This is basically a sentence that introduces

what the paragraph is going to be about.

You should mention WHAT you are going to discuss in the paragraph, and refer back to the question.

REMEMBER YOUR KEY WORDS AND ALTERNATIVE LANGUAGE!


Topic sentences

Topic Sentences

All TOPIC SENTENCES should make some reference to the essay question.

A good way to do this is through the KEY WORDS we extract from the essay question.


Example topic sentences

Example Topic Sentences

In ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Lee emphasises the social prejudices of Maycomb through Scout’s own experiences of different classes in the playground.

Lee goes on to explore the racial tensions in the town, highlighting the inferiority of status the black community has.

Through Scout and Jem’s games and stories of Boo Radley’s true nature, we see how even those who do not engage with society are judged in such a small community.


Referencing the question

Referencing the question

A reader should be able to guess what the essay question is simply by looking at your essay.

It is VITAL that you ensure you refer to the question throughout – this is the only way you will be sure that you have actually answered the question!


Critical essay masterclass

Task

  • In your groups, write THREE topic sentences for the following essay question:

    Choose a novel or a short story in which the author creates a fascinating character.

    By referring to appropriate techniques, show how the author has created this character and why you found him/her so fascinating.

  • Be prepared to share with the class!


Evidence

Evidence

  • The evidence is the quotation or description of the scene, shot or technique you are using to back up your point.

  • It is important that you pick evidence that you can explain and evaluate FULLY.

  • Finding quotations isn’t always easy, but it’s much easier when you know the book well – NEVER

  • Never just drop evidence in – always introduce them within the CONTEXT of the story, i.e. what is happening at this point in the story or film, what characters are involved and who they are, etc.


Example1

EXAMPLE

TOPIC SENTENCE: Lee goes on to explore the racial tensions in the town, highlighting the inferiority of status the black community has.

EVIDENCE: At Tom’s trial, he makes the mistake of admitting feeling empathy for Mayella Ewell.

“ ‘You felt sorry for her, you felt sorry for her?’


Evaluation analysis

Evaluation (Analysis)

  • This is the chance for you to explain how the quotation backs up the point you are making

  • You need to make sure that you fully explain the quotation or shot/scene/technique.

  • You then need to evaluate it - give your opinion on how successful it is.

  • Your opinion should be implicit - do not write “I think”.


3 steps for analysing quotations

3 Steps for Analysing Quotations

  • 1. Break the sentence down – look at the meaning and connotations of individual words, techniques and phrases, as well as the whole sentence

    e.g. “ ‘You felt sorry for her, you felt sorry for her?’

    The repetition of ‘sorry’, as well as the tone of incredulity in Mr Gilmer’s voice through the emphasis on ‘you’, emphasises his disbelief that someone of Tom’s race could possibly be superior enough to have pity for a white woman like Mayella.


3 steps for analysing quotations1

3 Steps for Analysing Quotations

  • 2. Think about what the whole sentence suggests

    e.g. “ ‘You felt sorry for her, you felt sorry for her?’

    This quote highlights the belief that - despite Mayella’s horrific home life – a “nigger” has no place feeling empathy for someone of a higher social standing, i.e. someone white.


3 steps for analysing quotations2

3 Steps for Analysing Quotations

  • 3. Comment on the context of the quotation

    e.g. “ ‘You felt sorry for her, you felt sorry for her?’

    Here, Lee successfully implies that Tom has in a sense signed his own death warrant; by engaging with Mayella, and feeling “sorry” for her, he has inadvertently placed himself above her in terms of social status, and will now be seen as arrogant and not knowing of his ‘true place’ in Maycomb’s society.


Example2

EXAMPLE

TOPIC SENTENCE: Lee goes on to explore the racial tensions in the town, highlighting the inferiority of status the black community has.

EVIDENCE: At Tom’s trial, he makes the mistake of admitting feeling empathy for Mayella Ewell.

“ ‘You felt sorry for her, you felt sorry for her?’

EVALUATION: The repetition of sorry, as well as the tone of incredulity in Mr Gilmer’s voice, emphasises the belief that -despite Mayella’s horrific home life – a “nigger” has no place feeling empathy for someone of a higher social standing, i.e. someone white. Here, Lee successfully implies that Tom has in a sense signed his own death warrant; by engaging with Mayella, and feeling “sorry” for her, he has inadvertently placed himself above her in terms of social status, and will now be seen as arrogant and not knowing of his ‘true place’ in Maycomb’s society.


Putting p e e together

Putting P E E Together

Point/ Topic Sentence.

Evidence – description of scene and technique.

Evaluation/Analysis.

And that’s ONE paragraph.


Which should look like this

Which should look like this…

Lee goes on to explore the racial tensions in the town, highlighting the inferiority of status the black community has. At Tom’s trial, he makes the mistake of admitting feeling empathy for Mayella Ewell.

“ ‘You felt sorry for her, you felt sorry for her?’

The repetition of ‘sorry’, as well as the tone of incredulity in Mr Gilmer’s voice through the emphasis on ‘you’ highlights the belief that - despite Mayella’s horrific home life – a “nigger” has no place feeling empathy for someone of a higher social standing, i.e. someone white. Here, Lee successfully implies that Tom has in a sense signed his own death warrant; by engaging with Mayella, and feeling “sorry” for her, he has inadvertently placed himself above her in terms of social status, and will now be seen as arrogant and not knowing of his ‘true place’ in Maycomb’s society.


Critical essay masterclass

TASK

  • In groups, write a paragraph based on this quotation:

    “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view... Until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it.”

  • Be prepared to share your paragraph with the class!


How do we write a conclusion

How do we write a conclusion?

An effective conclusion should:

Refer back to the questions.

Summarise your main points.

Comment on how effective the writer/director has been in their use of techniques.


Example3

Example

  • Harper Lee’s ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ is a compelling novel, which explores in depth the complex nature of prejudice in a small town. Through Scout’s narrative we become aware of the judgments even children pronounce on each other, as she defines peers such as Walter by their family’s reputation. That discrimination is reflected in the adult population of Maycomb, whose aggression towards Atticus during Tom Robinson’s court case is poisonous – here Lee effectively emphasises how quickly the small town can turn on their own, and the innocence of Scout’s narrative voice highlights further the far more dangerous racial tensions in the town. The novel’s climax, and Tom’s symbolic fate, are all the more tragic for their seeming inevitability. Only Boo Radley escapes the shadow of prejudice, saving the Finch children. Lee successfully shows how through engaging with the society that has judged him, he is able to reconstruct his image in their eyes, allowing Scout and Jem to see beyond their own child-like prejudices.


Critical essay masterclass

Task

  • In groups, write a conclusion based on the following question:

    Discuss how prejudice is explored in ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’.

    You should make reference to techniques and quotations throughout.


Critical essay masterclass

Task

  • Create detailed plans for each of the essay questions on the previous slide.

  • Your plan should be for each paragraph and follow the PEE structure, as well as the 3 steps for analysis.

  • P – Point, topic sentence, what your paragraph will discuss, such as characterisation, theme, technique, etc.

  • E – Evidence, your quotation.

  • E – Evaluation, 3 steps of analysis, comment on how effective or successful the writer’s use of technique has been.

    3 steps of analysis

    1. Break the sentence down – look at the meaning and connotations of individual words, techniques and phrases, as well as the whole sentence.

    2. Think about what the whole sentence suggests.

    3. Comment on the context of the quotation, how it relates to themes, characters, symbols, etc.


  • Login