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International Conference on Road Safety at Work, 16 – 18 February, 2009, Marriott-Wardman Park Hotel, Washington DC PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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International Conference on Road Safety at Work, 16 – 18 February, 2009, Marriott-Wardman Park Hotel, Washington DC. Panel Discussion #2 Emerging market perspective Tony Bliss Lead Road Safety Specialist Energy, Transport and Water Department Sustainable Development Network The World Bank.

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International Conference on Road Safety at Work, 16 – 18 February, 2009, Marriott-Wardman Park Hotel, Washington DC

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International Conference on Road Safety at Work,16 – 18 February, 2009, Marriott-Wardman Park Hotel, Washington DC

Panel Discussion #2

Emerging market perspective

Tony Bliss

Lead Road Safety Specialist

Energy, Transport and Water Department

Sustainable Development Network

The World Bank


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Scale of the problem

Road safety at work is undoubtedly a huge problem in low and middle-income countries, but the data are deficient and assumptions have to be made about its true scale. It is reasonable to assume that the impacts would be proportionately greater in these countries, given the high proportion of work-related driving in freight, services and public transport.

The impacts of work-related road safety go beyond the workers themselves to the other road users and passengers killed or injured in work-related crashes.


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DALYS in low and middle-income countries (total population)

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1

1

3

4

6

9

10

12

12

15

17

26

Source: Mathers C, Loncar D. Updated projections of global mortality & burden of disease, WHO, 2005


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DALYS in low and middle income countries (male population)

1

1

1

2

2

3

6

10

15

14

13

16

22

Source: Mathers C, Loncar D. Updated projections of global mortality & burden of disease, WHO, 2005


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DALYS in low and middle income countries (children age 5-14)

1

1

1

2

2

4

4

16

20

22

23

22

27

Source: Mathers C, Loncar D. Updated projections of global mortality & burden of disease, WHO, 2005


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Management system

Road safety is produced, just like any other goods and services.

This production process can be viewed as a managementsystem and we can assess country safety management capacity from this perspective.

We can also assess the management of road safety at work within this systematic framework.


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Evolution of system

The road safety management system has evolved from one of ‘blaming the victim’ through to one of shared responsibility, the ‘Safe System’ approach, which is well aligned with OSH principles.

Recent developments include the OECD/ITF promotion of the ‘Safe System’ approach to all countries irrespective of their income or road safety performance, and the preparation of an ISO standard for road traffic safety management systems.


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Implications for LMICs?

Road safety management capacity is weak in low and middle-income countries and this must be addressed as a priority, recognizing that occupational safety and health benefits will flow through from an improved strategic response that addresses the safety of the total road system and all its users.

Simultaneously there is value in addressing work related road safety activities by engaging directly with the formal and informal commercial sector, to seek ways to improve freight and public transport safety.


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Facility initiatives

Promoting road safety in multi-country trade corridors in Africa, including working with the transport industry to improve commercial truck safety practices and performance. Key partners include Total, GRSP and Chevron.

Promoting country road safety management capacity reviews and the creation of ‘2nd generation’ investment projects that can include work-related road safety components.

Improving country road safety data, working in partnership with the Harvard Initiative for Global Health. This program can be focused onto work-related road traffic injuries.


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Thank you


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