Slide1 l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 41

Getting All the Funds You Should: Identifying Homeless, Neglected and Delinquent Youth 9th Annual Title Programs Conference June 15-16, 2011 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 122 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Getting All the Funds You Should: Identifying Homeless, Neglected and Delinquent Youth 9th Annual Title Programs Conference June 15-16, 2011. Charles E. Barker, Grants Program Consultant and Eric McGhee, Grants Program Manager Outreach Programs Division School Improvement. Content.

Download Presentation

Getting All the Funds You Should: Identifying Homeless, Neglected and Delinquent Youth 9th Annual Title Programs Conference June 15-16, 2011

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Slide1 l.jpg

Getting All the Funds You Should:

Identifying Homeless, Neglected and Delinquent Youth

9th Annual Title Programs Conference

June 15-16, 2011

Charles E. Barker, Grants Program Consultant

and

Eric McGhee, Grants Program Manager

Outreach Programs Division

School Improvement


Content l.jpg

Content

  • Overview of Title I, Part D

    • Subpart 1

    • Subpart 2

  • Overview of Title X, Part C

  • Environment Codes


Overview of title i part d l.jpg

Neglected, Delinquent and At-Risk Youth Education Program

Overview of Title I, Part D


Overview of title i part d4 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

Neglected and Delinquent Children defined:

  • Neglected = Children and youth who are in need of care due to abandonment, neglect, or death of their parents or guardians.

  • Delinquent = Children who have been adjudicated to be delinquent or in need of supervision.


Overview of title i part d5 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

The purpose of Title I, Part D is to:

  • Improve educational services for children and youth in local and state institutions for neglected and delinquent (N&D) students so that such students have the opportunity to meet the same challenging state academic content standards and challenging state student academic achievement standards that all children in Georgia are expected to meet;

  • Provide N&D students with the services needed to make a successful transition from institutionalization to further schooling or employment; and

  • Prevent at-risk youth from dropping out of school, and to provide dropouts, and children and youth returning from correctional facilities or institutions for neglected or delinquent children and youth, with a support system to ensure their continued education.


Overview of title i part d6 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

  • Local educational agencies (LEAs) and state agencies (SAs) in Georgia serve neglected and/or delinquent youths in institutions operated or contracted by these agencies.

  • GaDOE provides resources to LEAs and SAs to carry out the purposes of Title I, Part D based upon the submission of a required plan and application.


Overview of title i part d7 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

Grantees and Population

  • Title I, Part A

    • Provides financial assistance to LEAs and schools with high numbers or high percentages of poor children to help ensure that all children meet challenging state academic standards.

  • Title I, Part D

    • Subpart 1 - Provides financial assistance to educational programs for youth in state-operated facilities or community day programs.

    • Subpart 2 - Provides financial assistance to support eligible LEA programs involving collaboration with locally operated correctional facilities.


Overview of title i part d8 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

  • Subpart 1

    • Provides assistance for State Agencies

      • Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ)

      • Georgia Department of Corrections (GDC)

      • Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD)

  • Subpart 2

    • Provides assistance for LEAs

      • Working in collaboration with local residential correctional facilities (In Georgia, O.C.G.A. 20-2-133(b) facilities MAY be eligible)


Overview of title i part d9 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

Types of Residential Facilities

  • There are several types of residential facilities that LEAs will serve:

    • N&D facilities which fall under O.C.G.A. 20-2-133(b)

      • Primarily, these facilities provide the “regular” educational program on-site; however, in a few cases, some children may attend LEA schools. The children in these type of facilities will be considered either “neglected” or “delinquent” based on the determination of the facility.


Overview of title i part d10 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

  • Neglected facilities which are licensed under the Office of Residential Child Care (ORCC)

    • Primarily, children in these facilities receive their “regular” educational program in an LEA school; however, supplementary educational services may be provided on-site. The children in these facilities are considered “neglected” for reporting purposes.

  • Delinquent facilities which are licensed under ORCC

    • Primarily, children in these facilities receive their “regular” educational program in an LEA school; however, supplementary educational services may be provided on-site. The children in these facilities are considered “delinquent” for reporting purposes.


Overview of title i part d11 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

O.C.G.A. 20-2-133(b)

  • Some N&D residential facilities were previously under the direct supervision of DJJ; however, DJJ moved away from directly supervising privately run facilities. These facilities were in danger of operating without oversight.

  • In the summer of 2006, the Georgia Legislature passed Senate Bill 618 transferring the education responsibility for children in state custody to LEAs.


Overview of title i part d12 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

As a result of O.C.G.A. 20-2-133(b), the following students are eligible for enrollment in the educational programs of an LEA:

  • All students who are “in the physical or legal custody” of DJJ, DBHDD or ORCC.

  • Students in a facility or placement operated by DBHDD or ORCC.

  • Students in a facility or placement paid for by DJJ, DBHDD or ORCC or any of its divisions.

  • Students physically present within the geographical area served by an LEA for any length of time.

    Because neglected and delinquent students are eligible for enrollment in the educational programs of the LEA, students can transition to LEA schools without interruption to their educational program.


Overview of title i part d13 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

Services for N&D Children

  • In general, the same allowable services provided under Title I are the same type of services provided to N&D residential facilities and children.

  • Resources provided to N&D residential facilities and children should supplement, and not supplant, the “regular” school program.

  • Services may include before and after school tutorials, summer school, credit recovery, educational materials and supplies, and more.


Overview of title i part d14 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

Title I, Part A Set Aside Funding

  • All N&D residential facilities qualify to receive support from the Title I, Part A set-aside.

  • LEAs must describe N&D services for residential facilities derived from Title I, Part A funding in the Set-Aside section on the Consolidated Application in the Coordination page.


Overview of title i part d15 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

Title I, Part A Set-Aside Funding

  • US ED determines the LEA Title I, Part A neglected set-aside amount based on the neglected child count derived from the N&D Annual Survey.

  • LEAs must use the entire Title I, Part A neglected set-aside for N&D children, unless the LEA has written verification that the residential facilities do not need the entire amount – the unclaimed amount reverts back to Title I, Part A.

  • LEAs are required to consult with all N&D facilities located in the LEA’s school attendance area to determine needs.


Overview of title i part d title i part a set aside funding l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part DTitle I, Part A Set Aside Funding


Overview of title i part d17 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

Title I, Part A Additional Support

  • The LEA may choose to use additional Title I, Part A funds to support N&D children. (This is not required!)

  • To do this, LEAs may

    • Create a Custom Set-Aside in the Consolidated Application with the proposed budget and activities, or

    • Include the additional funds in the neglected set-aside.

      • LEA should delineate between the required neglected set-aside amount and the additional funds.

  • The CLIP (coordination page) should fully explain in detail the needs analysis that determined this use of funds and how the resources will be used.


Overview of title i part d18 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

Title I, Part D, Subpart 1 - State Agency Programs

  • State agencies responsible for the care of children and youth:

    • In institutions for N&D children and youth.

    • Attending community day programs for N&D children and youth.

    • In adult correctional institutions.


Overview of title i part d19 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

Title I, Part D, Subpart 2 - Uses of Funds

  • Carry out high-quality education programs.

  • Assist in the transition of children and youth returning to the local “regular” school environment from correctional facilities and help them remain in school to complete their education.

  • Provide dropout prevention programs to serve at-risk children and youth.


Overview of title i part d20 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

Title I, Part D, Subpart 2 - Uses of Funds

  • Coordinate health and social services for N&D children, if the provision of such services will improve the likelihood of children completing their education.

  • Provide special programs to meet unique academic needs of N&D children.

  • Provide mentoring and peer mediation.


Overview of title i part d21 l.jpg

Overview of Title I, Part D

Scenario #1

  • Ashbury Park Home is a residential facility covered under O.C.G.A. 20-2-133(b) located on E Street in Lucky Town located in Magic County, Georgia. Director B. Springsteen says that the facility staff gives a human touch to all students he believes were born to run. Although all the teachers are working on a dream and were born in the U.S.A., they do not meet the highly qualified standard. Through consultation and a educational needs assessment, Ashbury Park Home and Magic County School System decide to address the needs of the students by sending teachers to provide supplemental educational services.

  • Who is responsible for hiring the supplemental teachers and do they have to be highly qualified?


Overview of title x part c l.jpg

McKinney-Vento Act

Overview of Title X, Part C


Slide23 l.jpg

Overview of Title X, Part C

Program Purpose

  • Ensure homeless children and youth (HCY) have equal access to the same free, appropriate public education, including public preschool education, as provided to other children and youth.

  • Ensure access to education and other services needed to ensure that HCY have an opportunity to meet the same challenging state student academic achievement standards to which all students are held.

  • Facilitate the enrollment, attendance, and success in school of HCY.

  • Review and revise laws, regulations, practices, and policies that may act as barriers to the enrollment, attendance, and success in school of HCY.


Slide24 l.jpg

Overview of Title X, Part C

Definition of Homeless Students

  • Individuals whose nighttime residence is NOT:

    • Fixed—stationary, permanent, and not subject to change

    • Regular—used on a predictable, routine, or consistent basis

    • Adequate—sufficient for meeting both the physical and psychological needs typically met in the home

      (42 U.S.C.§11434A(2)(B)(i))

      Can the student go to the SAME PLACE (fixed) EVERY NIGHT (regular) to sleep in a SAFE AND SUFFICIENT SPACE (adequate)?


Overview of title x part c25 l.jpg

Overview of Title X, Part C

The Homeless definition includes children and youth who are:

  • sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or similar reason;

  • living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camping grounds due the lack of alternative accommodations;

  • living in emergency or transitional shelters;

  • abandoned in hospitals;


Overview of title x part c26 l.jpg

Overview of Title X, Part C

Homelessalso includes children and youth who are:

  • awaiting foster care placement;

  • living in a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings;

  • living in cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus/train stations, or similar settings;

  • migratory – who qualify as homeless living in circumstances described above.


Overview of title x part c27 l.jpg

Overview of Title X, Part C

Definition of Unaccompanied Homeless Youth (UHY)

  • Unaccompanied = not in the physical custody of a parent or guardian; in practical terms, this means the youth does not live with the parent or guardian.

  • 2-Step Process:

    • Does the student’s living arrangement meet the McKinney-Vento Act’s definition of homeless?

    • Once homelessness is determined, is the student unaccompanied?


Overview of title x part c28 l.jpg

Overview of Title X, Part C

  • Unaccompanied youth have the same rights as other students experiencing homelessness.

  • Unaccompanied youth have run away from home, been thrown out of their homes, and/or been abandoned by parents or guardians. These young people are separated from their parents for a variety of reasons. Over half report being physically abused at home, and over one third report sexual abuse. Over two-thirds report that at least one of their parents abuses drugs or alcohol.


Overview of title x part c29 l.jpg

Overview of Title X, Part C

Scenario #2

  • Charles was kicked out of his house after graduating high school. He had problems getting along with his stepmom for some time and the level of conflict escalated out of control. He went to live with his friend, Eric, but Eric’s parents said Charles can only stay there until the end of the summer, when Eric leaves for college. Charles is no longer in contact with his dad and stepmom.

  • According to McKinney-Vento, is Charles an unaccompanied homeless youth?


Environment codes l.jpg

Neglected, Delinquent, Homeless and Unaccompanied Youth Codes

Environment codes


Environment code l.jpg

Environment Code

ENVIRONMENT CODE indicates the type of residential environment in which a student resides or the type of school the student attended at anytime during this school year at this school. Code only those students for whom one of the codes below apply. For students where codes do not apply, leave blank.


Environment codes32 l.jpg

Environment Codes

Children coded “1” are “neglected” and generate funding from:

  • FTE,

  • Title I, Part A – reservation for neglected children.

    The number of students coded in the student information system (SIS) should be consistent with the annual neglected count taken in October; although the number may not be an exact match.


Environment code33 l.jpg

Environment Code

Children coded “2” are “delinquent” and generate funding from:

  • FTE,

  • Possibly Title I, Part D – if the LEA reported numbers above the state median.

    The number of students coded in SIS should be consistent with the annual neglected count taken in October; although the number may not be an exact match.


Environment code34 l.jpg

Environment Code

Children coded “3” are “homeless” and generate funding from:

  • FTE,

  • Title I, Part A – reservation for homeless children,

  • Title X, Part C – McKinney-Vento Grant (competitive grant).

    The number of homeless students coded in SIS are preloaded into the annual homeless survey in the LEA consolidated application and reported to US ED. After June 30, these numbers are final and cannot be changed.


Environment code35 l.jpg

Environment Code

Children coded “4” are “unaccompanied” and generate funding from:

  • FTE,

  • Title I, Part A – reservation for homeless children,

  • Title X, Part C – McKinney-Vento Grant (competitive grant).

    The number of unaccompanied students coded in SIS are preloaded into the annual homeless survey in the LEA consolidated application and reported to US ED. After June 30, these numbers are final and cannot be changed.


Environment code36 l.jpg

Environment Code

If LEA officials believe a student fits into more than one category, consider the following when coding in SIS:

  • Debate between neglected or delinquent…

    • No crime = neglected.

    • Adjudicated = delinquent.

  • Debate between homeless or unaccompanied…

    • with parent = homeless.

    • without parent = unaccompanied.

  • Debate between {homeless/unaccompanied} or {neglected/delinquent} = homeless/unaccompanied.


  • Environment code37 l.jpg

    Environment Code

    LEA Responsibilities:

    • Verify the N&D students (i.e. The students listed on the Annual N&D Survey) are properly coded in the Student Information System (SIS).

    • Report student record data for N&D students through the LEA SIS Coordinators.


    Environment code38 l.jpg

    Environment Code

    LEA Responsibilities:

    • Homeless Liaison works with LEA Student Information System (SIS) specialist to ensure that the system includes fields for accurate reporting of required data.

    • Homeless Liaison assists LEA SIS specialist with training and disseminating information to appropriate personnel in schools (I.e. Administration, Counselors, School Nutrition, Teachers).


    Environment code39 l.jpg

    Environment Code

    Scenario #3

    • In September, Joe Johnson’s father was incarcerated for impersonating Kirk Hinrich. Joe was sent to live with his Grandfather Josh Smith. In March, after Josh was abducted by the giant hawk, Joe was sent to Phillip’s Arena Residential Facility in Dominique Wilkins’ County. When Joe enrolls in the local high school, the school staff should code him as ____ in SIS?


    Environment code40 l.jpg

    Environment Code

    Bottom Line

    • Evaluations are enhanced by properly coding students.

    • All students in N&D facilities should be coded something – code based on placement.

    • N&D students generate funding through the Annual N&D Survey, while homeless and unaccompanied youth generate funding based on data derived from SIS.

      Consider this…

    • Based on the information presented, what beliefs, attitudes or procedures must change?


    Contact information l.jpg

    Contact Information

    Charles E. Barker, Ed.D.

    Grants Program Consultant

    School Improvement

    Twin Towers East, Suite 1866

    205 Jesse Hill Jr. Drive SE

    Atlanta, GA 30334

    (770) 315-2238 - Office

    (770) 982-3067 - Fax

    [email protected]

    Eric McGhee

    Grants Program Manager

    School Improvement

    Twin Towers East, Suite 1866

    205 Jesse Hill Jr. Drive SE

    Atlanta, GA 30334

    (404) 651-7555 - Office

    (404) 657-1534 - Fax

    [email protected]


  • Login