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Associate Level Program Development Tuesday, June 5, 2012 15 th Annual Emergency Management Higher Education Conference EMI - Emmitsburg , MD June 4-7, 2012 Moderator: Clinton J. Andersen - [email protected] Presenters: Lark Stewart Judy Jaeger Benn Prybutok

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Associate Level Program Development

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

15thAnnual Emergency Management Higher Education Conference

EMI - Emmitsburg, MD

June 4-7, 2012

Moderator: Clinton J. Andersen - [email protected]

Presenters: Lark Stewart

Judy Jaeger

Benn Prybutok

Robert Aberle


Sustaining an academic program lark stewart edmonds community college

Emergency Management, Homeland Security, or Other Disciplines

Sustaining an Academic Program

Lark Stewart

Edmonds Community College


Foundational partnership
Foundational Partnership Disciplines

Profession

Vision

Skills

Incentives

Resources

Action Plan

Academia

Competencies

Regulations

Industry Demand

Jobs / Careers

Disciplines

Credentialing

Curricula

Objectives

Outcomes

Feasibility

Funding

Support

Commitment

C

Q

I

ALIGNED

Lark Stewart - 15th Annual EMHE Conference


Confusion
Confusion Disciplines

Lacking clarity or consensus on the vision results in:

Lark Stewart - 15th Annual EMHE Conference


Anxiety
Anxiety Disciplines

When individuals lack the skills [KSA] to get the job done the result is:

Lark Stewart - 15th Annual EMHE Conference


Gradual change
Gradual Change Disciplines

Both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation is critical, if there are no incentives the result is:

Lark Stewart - 15th Annual EMHE Conference


Frustration
Frustration Disciplines

Providing the right resources at the right time can accelerate the capabilities of program, or it can cause inevitable:

Lark Stewart - 15th Annual EMHE Conference


The Links of Organizational Effectiveness Disciplines

Lark Stewart - 15th Annual EMHE Conference


Contact Information: Disciplines

(425) 640-1877 [email protected]

Edmonds Community College

20000 68th Avenue West

Lynnwood, WA 98036

http://www.edcc.edu/emergency

Edmonds Community College Director, Emergency Management Program

Previously a DHS/FEMA Employee & Reservist

FEMA contract instructor for L363: Multi-hazard Emergency Planning for Higher Education

Thank you for your participation!

Lark Stewart - 15th Annual EMHE Conference


Curriculum development

Curriculum Development Disciplines

Judy D. Jaeger

Program Chair/ Instructor

Central Georgia Technical College


In the beginning
In the beginning…. Disciplines

  • Two agencies agree to work together

  • Agency reps develop a Plan

  • The “ideal” Emergency Manager needs what knowledge, skills and abilities?

  • Georgia technical colleges already offer which courses?

  • Which courses are already part of the PDS?

  • Which courses need to be developed?


The ideal emergency manager
The “ideal” Emergency Manager Disciplines

  • Can write and develop an EOP

  • Can develop an Exercise Program

  • Can create and follow a budget

  • Can work with a variety of personalities

  • Understands local, state, and federal government requirements

  • Can provide a persuasive argument for his/ her cause…etc.


Technical college system of georgia
Technical College System of Georgia Disciplines

  • Already has state standards for

    • English

    • Math

    • Humanities

    • Economics

    • Psychology

    • Public Speaking

    • Intro to Computers, various Management courses


Federal emergency management agency
Federal Emergency Management Agency Disciplines

  • Already teaches courses in the Professional Development Series, such as

    • Principles of Emergency Management

    • Emergency Planning

    • Exercise Design & Evaluation

    • Haz Mat Contingency Planning

    • Effective Communication


Georgia emergency management agency
Georgia Emergency Management Agency Disciplines

  • GEMA agreed to develop the following additional courses:

    • Mass Fatalities Incident Response

    • Infection Control

    • Facility Security

    • Haz Mat Awareness

    • Developing Community Resources

    • Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT)


The evolution
The Evolution…. Disciplines

  • Over time, all courses were developed; all are offered online; most are offered in the classroom

  • Textbooks have been researched;

  • Audio visual materials have been purchased;

  • Online courses have been offered from the very beginning….



Finding students
Finding Students…. Disciplines

  • Normally, twelve students in attendance allows a course to “make.”

  • Four unique factors led to the eventual success of our college’s EM program….


Factor 1
Factor #1: Disciplines

  • CGTC first offered three online classes, FREE OF CHARGE, using State Employees as adjunct instructors. (Not a great plan.)

  • CGTC quickly hired a fulltime instructor, thus, the Instructor was able (and willing) to teach very small classes of five students.

  • Over time, the numbers grew because of factors 2-4…


Factor 2
Factor #2: Disciplines

  • CGTC already had a well-established Criminal Justice Program.

  • The CRJ Program Chair allows two to four “electives” in his program, so he began sending students to take EM courses. (Some stayed!)


Factor 3
Factor #3: Disciplines

  • Two of the EM courses were offered as college-wide electives (Effective Communication and Infection Control)

  • This brought Allied Health students, Early Childhood Education students, and several other disciplines into EM classes. (Some stayed!)


Factor 4
Factor #4: Disciplines

  • When folks were looking for Emergency Management courses to take, they found us at FEMA’s Higher Education website! (Thank you, FEMA!)

  • CGTC has had students from Washington State, Iowa, Texas, Indiana, California, as well as members of our military who are serving overseas…


One last note
One last note… Disciplines

  • We did not attempt to run a cohort program.

  • Other colleges in Georgia who attempted this eventually closed their programs.


Judy d jaeger

Questions? Disciplines

Judy D. Jaeger

Central Georgia Technical College

3300 Macon Tech Drive

Macon, GA 31206

(478) 757-5289

[email protected]


Montgomery county community college s emergency management planning emp aas
Montgomery County Community College’s Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

Montgomery County Community College’s

Emergency Management & Planning (“EMP”) AAS Degree Program

Benn Prybutok, MA, EJD

Director, Criminal Justice Studies,

Fire Science, & Emergency Management

Montgomery County Community College

Blue Bell, PA

[email protected]


Montgomery county community college s emergency management planning emp aas1
Montgomery County Community College’s Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

  • Career Preparation –

  • The EMP AAS degree stresses the overarching

  • administrative, managerial, planning, and leadership

  • skills necessary to facilitate intergovernmental

  • and inter-agency cooperation and coordination, along with developing a firm understanding of tactical response

  • theory and practice.

    • The Program emphasizes an understanding of

  • government, public agencies, and public policy management, as well as private sector needs and capabilities.


Montgomery county community college s emergency management planning emp aas2
Montgomery County Community College’s Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

  • Workforce Needs –

  • HPO designation under Pennsylvania’s Act 46 reflecting recognition of public and private needs for “Emergency Management Specialists” (CIP 43.0112; SOC 13-1061).

  • U.S. News & World Report listed Emergency Management as “…one of the 50 best careers of 2010 [which] should have strong growth over the next decade.” December 28, 2009

  • A projected need for Emergency Management Specialists is included in current data published by the Pennsylvania Department of Labor & Industry reflecting moderate to strong growth expected over the next decade.


Montgomery county community college s emergency management planning emp aas3
Montgomery County Community College’s Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

Top-Flight Advisory Committee –

  • Thomas M. Sullivan, Chair, Director, Montgomery County Department of Public Safety

  • Tom Garrity, Vice Chair, Deputy Director of Public Safety & Manager, Montgomery County Fire Academy; also Coordinator of Holy Family University BS transfer program

  • Regina S. “Gina” Bradley, MS, EMT-P, Chief of Operations, Springfield Ambulance Association

  • Robert C. Drennen, Director of Emergency Services, Upper Moreland Twp.

  • Jim Gallagher, King of Prussia Fire Department

  • Brian S. Gwiazdzinski, Director of Fire Protection, Merck & Company

  • Walter Kenney, Eastern Center for Arts & Technology

  • Richard M. Lesniak, Director, Department of Fire Services Montgomery Township

  • Joseph W. O'Neill, Fire Marshal, Cheltenham Township

  • Jeffrey M. Quinn, Director of Risk Management, AlliedBarton Security Services

  • John Remillard, Battalion Chief, Norristown Fire Department

  • Ken Schauder, President, Montgomery County Ambulance Association

  • Edward J. Wurster, III, MS, CHSP, Training & Exercise Coordinator, Delaware Valley Regional Terrorism Task Force


Montgomery county community college s emergency management planning emp aas4
Montgomery County Community College’s Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

Top-Flight Faculty –

  • Regina S. “Gina” Bradley, MS, EMT-P, Chief of Operations, Springfield Ambulance Association, M.A. in Public Safety, St. Joseph’s University

  • Kimberly Kirschner, Assistant Director of Emergency Services, Cheltenham Township,

  • MS in Public Health, West Chester University; M.S. in Em. Mgmt., Millersville University; Ph.D.(ABD) in Emergency Management, North Dakota State University

  • David Brown, Deputy Director, Montgomery County Department of Public Safety & EMS, M.A., University of Scranton

  • Kristopher Mattson, CEM, Montgomery County Department of Public Safety, Exercise Coordinator. M.A., Fairleigh Dickinson University

  • Sean Petty, Deputy Director, Montgomery County Department of Public Safety, MS-EE, MS-Applied Statistics, BS-EE, Villanova University

  • Scott Mickalonis, Deputy Director, Montgomery County Department of Public Safety, CEM, MA in Public Safety, St. Joseph’s University


Montgomery county community college s emergency management planning emp aas5
Montgomery County Community College’s Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

Restated & Streamlined Program Learning Outcomes –

A graduate of the program will be able to:

1.  Explain the difference between “emergency planning” and “emergency management;”

2.  Describe the regulatory and intergovernmental framework of emergency management and

planning.

3.  Perform a variety of differentroles and employ teamwork, team-building, and leadership skills in the context of incident management and planning exercises.

4.  Explain how planning affects and facilitates preparedness.

5.  Design an interactive planning process for companies and municipalities.

6.  Explain and differentiate between the principles of “Incident Command” and “Unified

Command”.

7.  Identify, evaluate, and respond to a range of specific hazardous conditions and scenarios in both individual and group exercises.

8.  Design a site safety plan.

9.  Apply “all-hazards” planning methodology in preparing for mass casualty events, including acts of terrorism.


Montgomery county community college s emergency management planning emp aas6
Montgomery County Community College’s Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

Informed by FEMA - EMI Competencies for Undergraduate Programs

in Emergency Management –

An individual with an undergraduate degree should be able to demonstrate knowledge, skills and abilities in all of the following areas:

  • FOUNDATIONAL TENETS

  • Historical awareness

  • Effective communications

  • Leadership, management and decision making

  • Personal, organizational, and professional development

  • SUPPORTING AREAS

  • Public administration and community planning and development

  • Public, private and nongovernmental organization networking

  • Current and emerging technologies

  • CORE AREAS

  • Principles of Emergency Management

  • Human dimensions

  • Policy and legal dimensions

  • Areas of emergency management responsibilities

  • Risk assessment process and methodology

  • Awareness and Promotion of EM

  • EM standards, best practices and comparative practices


Montgomery county community college s emergency management planning emp aas7
Montgomery County Community College’s Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

Curricular Analysis -

First Semester

ENG 101 English Composition-I………………….3

Math course that meets Goal #3…………………3

FSC 100 Introduction to Fire Science………….3

EMP 100 Emergency Planning……………………3

POL 124 American National Government………3

(15 credit hours)

Second Semester

ENG 102 English Composition-II…………………3

Elective to meet Goal #8………………………...3-4

EMP 110 Incident Management…………………...3

FSC 103 Fire Dept Org & Mgmt. OR

CJS 270 Police Dept Org & Admin………………..3

POL 125 State & Local Government OR

POL 231 Public Policy Management……………..3

(15-16 credit hours)

Third Semester

HIS 102 History of Western Civilization…………3

FSC 102 Hazardous Materials…………………….3

EMP 120 Search & Rescue………………………...3

ANT 104 Intro to Cultural Anthropology………...3

CJS 250 Terrorism & Counterterrorism.......…….3

Elective to meet Goal #7...………………………….3

(18 credit hours)

Fourth Semester

EMP 210 Leadershp & Influence in Em Resp……3

EMP 200 Seminar in Em Management……………1

CIS 110 Computer Info Systems for Mgmt………3

EMP 265 Public Safety Technology………………..3

SPC 110 Intro to Speech Communication………...3

ESW 245 Safety and First Aid……………………….3

(16 credit hours)

TOTAL SEMESTER CREDIT HOURS : 64-65


Montgomery county community college s emergency management planning emp aas8
Montgomery County Community College’s Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

Concentration in Homeland Security –


Montgomery county community college s emergency management planning emp aas9
Montgomery County Community College’s Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

EMP Program Review Analysis & Recommendations –

Curricular review – EMP curriculum remains consistent with the curricular initiatives of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and its Emergency Management Institute (EMI). Curriculum continues to reflect current FEMA doctrine and has been extensively vetted by our own County Department of Public Safety.

Significant findings – EMP program continues to serve well a limited but important constituency within the County and region. More than half of our EMP majors are non-traditional students, and more than half are part-time. A large majority of our EMP majors are already “in-service” personnel. A significant number are employed in the private sector with area companies including Lockheed-Martin, Boeing, and Merck.

The program needs to achieve a more regular growth pattern. Although it is likely to remain relatively small, management believes that gains can be realized by more regularized and more frequent advertising through existing County channels.


Montgomery county community college s emergency management planning emp aas10
Montgomery County Community College’s Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

  • Significant findings of our 1st Five-Year APR –

  • For the Spring 2011 term there were 18 declared Emergency Management and Planning majors enrolled at the College, 3 on a full-time basis, and 15 on a part-time basis.

  • • Analysis of the Emergency Management and Planning Program by age reflects 38.89% of declared EMP majors as “traditional” students, and 61.11% as “non-traditional” students.

  • • Analysis of the Emergency Management and Planning Program by gender reflects 44.44% Female, and 55.56% Male.

  • • There were a total of 4 Emergency Management and Planning degrees conferred during the 2010-2011 academic year.


Montgomery county community college s emergency management planning emp aas11
Montgomery County Community College’s Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

Analysis & Recommendations –

Additional recommendations -- The Dean, Director, Advisory Committee, and faculty also recommend the following:

• Increase program enrollment by 50% by Spring 2015.

• Increase graduation rate to 20% by Spring 2015.

• Improve tracking of employment status of EMP majors and graduates.

• Add a representative from the K-12 sector, presumably an educator or administrator from one of our ‘tech-prep’ high school partners, to the Fire Science & Emergency Management Advisory Committee.

• Develop and implement the ‘Certificate of Completion’ in Homeland Security.


Montgomery county community college s emergency management planning emp aas12
Montgomery County Community College’s Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS


Montgomery county community college s emergency management planning emp aas13
Montgomery County Community College’s Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS


Montgomery county community college s emergency management planning emp aas14
Montgomery County Community College’s Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS


Montgomery county community college s emergency management planning emp aas15
Montgomery County Community College’s Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

Questions?

  • Contact information:

    • Benn Prybutok, MA, EJD

    • Director, Criminal Justice Studies,

    • Fire Science, & Emergency Management

    • Montgomery County Community College

    • 340 Dekalb Pike, #240 Parkhouse Hall

    • Blue Bell, PA 19422

    • Phone: 215 641-6428

    • Email: [email protected]


Emergency management homeland security administration college of southern nevada

Emergency Management/Homeland Security Administration Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AASCollege of Southern Nevada

Curriculum Development and Student Recruitment

By: Robert Aberle


College of southern nevada
College of Southern Nevada Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS


  • The College of Southern Nevada Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

    • 3 main campuses

      • Las Vegas

      • Henderson

      • North Las Vegas

    • 8 satellite centers

    • 44,088 students (2010)

    • 501 full-time faculty

      • 911 part-time faculty


  • Degrees and Certificates Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

    • 1 Bachelor of Science, Dental Hygiene

    • 27 Associate of Arts Degrees (AA)

    • 82 Associate of Applied Science Degrees (AAS)

    • 10 Associate of Science Degrees (AS)

    • 1 Associate of Business Degree (AB)

    • 1 Associate of General Studies Degree (AGS)

    • 76 Certificates of Achievement (CA)


  • Department of Public Safety & Human Services Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

    • Criminal Justice

      • 2,646 students

    • Emergency Management/Homeland Security Administration

      • 116 students

    • Human Services

      • 216 students

    • Military Science (ROTC)

      • 15 students


Curriculum development1
Curriculum development Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS


Emergency management administration
Emergency Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AASManagement Administration

  • Program started in 2005 as an AA Degree in Emergency Management Administration

  • There have been no changes made in the curriculum since the inception until now

  • The curriculum currently consists of 32 credits of general education requirements and 32 credits of program requirements

    • There were are no electives offered


Emergency management administration1
Emergency Management Administration Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS


Emergency management administration2
Emergency Management Administration Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

  • Timeline:

    • Fall 2005

      • EMA courses and degree offered for the first time with 1 adjunct faculty

    • Spring 2010

      • Added second adjunct faculty

    • Spring 2011

      • First TSA course offered

    • Fall 2011

      • Second TSA course offered

      • DECISION TIME – deactivate or improve

      • Set up advisory board to revamp curriculum

      • Added third adjunct faculty

    • Spring 2012

      • Third TSA course offered

      • Hired four additional adjunct instructors

      • New curriculum approved with program name change

      • First EMA graduates

    • Fall 2012

      • First courses will be offered from new curriculum


Emergency management homeland security administration
Emergency Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AASManagement/Homeland Security Administration

  • Advisory Board

    • Made up of 8 participants

      • Educators

      • EMA practitioners

        • Education

        • Medical

        • Fire department

        • Federal government


Emergency management homeland security administration1
Emergency Management/Homeland Security Administration Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

  • Advisory Board Suggestions/Accomplishments

    • Change program name

      • FromEmergency Management Administration toEmergency Management/Homeland Security Administration

    • Combine and deactivate courses

    • Re-write degree program and course descriptions

    • Add six new courses

    • Reduce degree requirements from 62 to 60 credits

    • Add 15 Credits of electives including an internship


Emergency management homeland security administration2
Emergency Management/Homeland Security Administration Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

  • Additional Changes

    • Added all three TSA courses as a part of the degree program

      • Introduction to Homeland Security

      • Transportation and Border Security

      • Intelligence Analysis and Security Management

    • Allowed for a choice of prerequisites

      • Introduction to Emergency Management OR

      • Introduction to Homeland Security

    • Added CRJ-104 Administration of Justice as an elective


Emergency management homeland security administration3
Emergency Management/Homeland Security Administration Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS


Important note
IMPORTANT NOTE Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

  • This curriculum is a work in progress

  • The Advisory Board will be meeting several times over then next two semesters (after implementation in Fall 2012) to re-visit all courses and continue to update and tweet the program


Class enrollment and recruitment
Class Enrollment and recruitment Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS


Enrollment
Enrollment Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

  • Fall 2005 = 6 students taking 1 course

  • Spring 2012 = 116 students taking 12 courses*

    * Low class size was to allow for some current students to complete courses needed for graduation


Enrollment1
Enrollment Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS


Recruitment efforts
Recruitment Efforts Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

  • Little was done to promote the program from inception until Spring 2011

  • Starting in Spring 2011 enrollment began to increase with the addition of the first TSA course

  • We now teach three TSA courses per semester with a total enrollment of about 40 students

    • TSA students who have completed the 3 course sequence are being encouraged by TSA and CSN to pursue their AA Degree


Recruitment efforts1
Recruitment Efforts Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AAS

  • All 6 of our current adjunct faculty are practitioners in the field and are actively recruiting students

  • The revised curriculum is being emphasized by CSN in local Go-To-College high school presentations

  • The program will be featured on CSN broadcasts on monitors in every building on all campuses

  • Brochures are being developed to go to high schools and business in and around the Las Vegas Valley


Questions

Robert Emergency Management &Planning (EMP) AASAberle

Professor/Department Chair

Department of Public Safety & Human Services

College of Southern Nevada

Las Vegas, Nevada

[email protected]

QUESTIONS??????????


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