Managing the process
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Managing the Process. Where do I begin and will I be able to do it?. The Research Journey. Research is a process that needs to be actively managed. You need to: be strategic in your preliminary planning be organized and prepared create the mental space necessary for research .

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Managing the Process

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Managing the process

Managing the Process

Where do I begin and will I be able to do it?

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


The research journey

The Research Journey

  • Research is a process that needs to be actively managed. You need to:

    • be strategic in your preliminary planning

    • be organized and prepared

    • create the mental space necessary for research

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


Exploring your own approach to knowledge

Exploring your ownapproach to knowledge

  • We all have preferences for how we approach knowledge

  • Familiarity with your own learning styles can help facilitate the development and implementation of your research plan

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


Brain hemisphere dominance

Brain Hemisphere Dominance

  • Left-brain: Analytic, organized, and logical - can struggle with randomness and spontaneity

  • Right-brain: Intuitive, holistic, and imaginative - can struggle with structure and order

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


Managing the process

VAK

  • Visual learners: Tend to gather data through ‘sight’. They often think in pictures; learn best from visual displays

  • Auditory learners: Tend to gather data through ‘hearing’. They learn best through verbal input and often interpret the underlying meanings of speech by listening to tone, pitch, speed, and other nuances

  • Kinesthetic learners: Tend to learn through moving, doing, and touching and enjoy a hands-on approach to exploring the world around them

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


Kolb learning styles

Kolb Learning Styles

  • Assimilator (or Theorist): Assimilators enjoy creating theoretical models and are interested in abstract concepts

  • Converger (or Pragmatist): Convergers generally enjoy the practical application of ideas and tend to approach work with objectivity

  • Accommodator (or Activist): Accommodators enjoy ‘doing’ and can adapt readily to new circumstances 

  • Divergers (or Reflectors): Divergers generally have excellent imaginations and are often interested in the lives and emotions of others

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


Surface deep and strategic learners

Surface, Deep, andStrategic Learners

  • Surface learners: Interested in ‘facts’ - they often rely on memory and do not enjoy conceptualization, theorizing, or making connections

  • Deep learners:Enjoy the search for meaning - they are often good at linking learning to experience and have an ability to integrate new knowledge with prior studies

  • Strategic learners: Pursue learning in order to achieve defined goals. There’s probably a bit of strategist in us all. If there wasn’t, it would be awfully hard to get through formal schooling

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


Navigating the process

Navigating the Process

  • In order for students to navigate a path through the research process, they need to:

    • familiarize themselves with their institution/ program’s resources and requirements

    • get appropriately set-up

    • negotiate the advisory process

    • manage their workload

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


Knowing the requirements

Knowing the requirements

  • To produce research that falls within university guidelines, you need to know your institution’s requirements. This can include:

    • Meeting deadlines

    • Staying within word limits

    • Gaining ethics approval

    • Providing progress reports

    • Giving seminars

    • Going through an examination process

    • Producing original works that avoids plagiarism

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


Become familiar with available resources

Become familiar with available resources

  • Some of the resources you may want to check on are:

    • accommodation

    • equipment

    • funds

    • library facilities

    • methods assistance

    • writing assistance

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


Getting set up

Getting Set-Up

  • Researching requires more independence and autonomy than general learning, so researchers need to get properly set up. This will involve:

    • access to a quiet place to work

    • a good reliable computer

    • proficiency in the use of that computer

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


Getting the right advice

Getting the right advice

  • Supervisory relationships can be difficult to negotiate. In order to ensure a positive and productive relationship you should attempt to:

    • work towards good communication

    • have clear expectations

    • strive for a sense of comfort in power relations  

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


Managing timelines

Managing Timelines

  • Researching can present real challenges in terms of workloads and timelines

  • Using Gantt charts and working with both discipline and inspiration can help you manage the process

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


Gantt chart

Gantt Chart

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


Getting the creative juices flowing

Getting the creative juices flowing

  • Some things to try…

    • work on / read over your research journal

    • force yourself to get on the computer

    • write a letter to a real or fictional friend

    • go for a walk

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


Finding a balance

Finding a balance

  • Most students carry the burden of having a variety of roles

  • Finding balance is essential to personal well-being and therefore success in all endeavours including research

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


Dealing with crisis

Dealing with Crisis

  • The research process is rarely an easy and straightforward journey. It often involves:

    • crises of motivation

    • crises of confidence

    • a lack of direction

    • feelings of disorganization

    • and coincides with life’s ups and downs

  • Knowing that you are not alone, and that there is support can help get you through

O'Leary, Z. (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage Chapter Two


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