Probabilistic forecasts of extreme precipitation events for the u s hazards assessment
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Probabilistic Forecasts of Extreme Precipitation Events for the U.S. Hazards Assessment. Kenneth Pelman 32 nd Climate Diagnostics Workshop Tallahassee, Florida. Outline. Current Hazards Assessment Motivation for Probabilistic Forecast Details of Objective Probabilistic Tool

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Probabilistic Forecasts of Extreme Precipitation Events for the U.S. Hazards Assessment

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Probabilistic forecasts of extreme precipitation events for the u s hazards assessment

Probabilistic Forecasts of Extreme Precipitation Events for the U.S. Hazards Assessment

Kenneth Pelman

32nd Climate Diagnostics Workshop

Tallahassee, Florida


Outline

Outline

  • Current Hazards Assessment

  • Motivation for Probabilistic Forecast

  • Details of Objective Probabilistic Tool

  • Verification Results

  • Conclusions

  • Future Work


Current cpc hazards assessment

Current CPC Hazards Assessment

Made each Monday-Friday and covers Days 3-14

Designed to take current state of climate and predict hazardous weather conditions in support of CPC’s mission

Hazards include heavy rain (a proxy for flooding), severe weather, extreme heat and cold, and severe drought

Hazard forecasts are subjective and deterministic


Motivation for a probabilistic hazards assessment

Motivation for a Probabilistic Hazards Assessment

Looking to improve on subjective scores

Probabilistic forecasts provide more information about uncertainty to users

Puts Hazards Assessment in same format as other popular CPC products, such as 6-10/8-14 day, monthly, and seasonal forecasts


Objective probabilistic heavy precipitation tool

Objective Probabilistic Heavy Precipitation Tool

Uses 0z, 6z, and 12z GFS ensemble members to forecast for 881 grid points across the CONUS

Rainfall totals not bias corrected or calibrated

1,2,and 3-day Hazards are forecast out to 384 hours

A Hazard is defined as the greater of 1 inch/day or the 95th percentile value

Climatology (1971-2000) derived from U.S. precipitation dataset (Higgins et. al. 2000)

Forecast probability contours in solid green, hazard thresholds in dashed black (in mm)


Reliability diagrams using total precipitation in period

Reliability Diagrams (Using Total Precipitation in Period)


Reliability diagrams using only 1 day in period

Reliability Diagrams (Using only 1 Day in Period)


1 day event contingency table scores 10 threshold

1-Day Event Contingency Table Scores (10% threshold)


2 day event contingency table scores 10 threshold

2- Day Event Contingency Table Scores (10% threshold)


3 day event contingency table scores 10 threshold

3-Day Event Contingency Table Scores (10 % threshold)


Roc diagram

ROC Diagram


Conclusions

Conclusions

  • Limited usefullness of this tool in a strict probabilistic sense

  • 1-Day Hazard forecasts show the best improvement over human-made Assessments

  • Tool can immediately be used by forecasters as a first guess

  • There is validity in converting the Hazards Assessments into a probabilistic forecast


Future work

Future Work

  • Determine best definition of a hazard

  • Generate contingency tables using different thresholds

  • Use calibrated precipitation forecasts and calibrated probabilities.

  • Use more ensembles in forecast (e.g. CAN, ECMWF, CFS)


Reference

Reference

  • Higgins, R.W., W. Shi, E. Yarosh and R. Joyce, 2000: Improved United States Precipitation Quality Control System and Analysis. NCEP/Climate Prediction Center Atlas No. 7.


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