Plagiarism don t do it
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Plagiarism: Don’t Do It! . An interactive guide to understanding and avoiding plagiarism. What’s this all about? What’s the big deal?. This presentation is designed to provide the most basic information about avoiding plagiarism. It might not necessarily help you write a great research paper.

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Plagiarism: Don’t Do It!

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Plagiarism don t do it

Plagiarism: Don’t Do It!

An interactive guide to understanding and avoiding plagiarism


What s this all about what s the big deal

What’s this all about? What’s the big deal?

  • This presentation is designed to provide the most basic information about avoiding plagiarism.

  • It might not necessarily help you write a great research paper.

  • But it will assist you in presenting your research sources accurately.


Plagiarism csb sju policy states that

PLAGIARISM:CSB/SJU Policy States that

  • Plagiarism is the act of appropriating and using the ideas, writings, or work of another person as one's own without giving credit to the person who created the work.


Plagiarism may result from

Plagiarism may result from:

  • an act of willful dishonesty intended to deceive the audience.

  • or from careless, ignorant, or inadequate citations, it still disrespects the work of its original author or creator.

    Either way it is still PLAGIARISM!


Consequences of plagiarism

Consequences of Plagiarism:

For first-time offenders the price of plagiarism varies with the severity of the theft from…

  • Correction of the assignment to

  • Failure of the assignment to

  • Failure of the course!


Repeat plagiarists

Repeat Plagiarists

Repeat offenders face the possibility of

  • Suspension (removal from school for the semester with the possibility of returning)

  • Expulsion (removal from school without the possibility of return)


Be aware

Be Aware!

In all cases determined to be plagiarism, a closed file will be placed in the office of the Academic Dean.


Be informed know the academic misconduct policy

Be informed! Know the Academic Misconduct policy!


Avoiding plagiarism citations

Avoiding Plagiarism: Citations

  • Citations let your reader know that you are using someone else’s ideas or words.

  • Proper citation is an important tool to avoid plagiarism.

  • The Library maintains a site to help you cite: http://www.csbsju.edu/Libraries/Library-Site-Index/Citing-Sources.htm

  • The Writing Center’s tutors can help you cite correctly.

    When in doubt: Cite!


Style style style s tyle

Style--Style---STYLE---Style

  • There are many styles or formats of citation available which are often discipline-specific.

  • Your professor will probably suggest or require a specific style guide to use in this class.


Citations will vary depending on citation style

Citations will vary depending on citation style:


Let s look at some examples of how to use citations

Let’s look at some examples of how to use citations


Our source is

Our source is:

(2011) “social media”  A Dictionary of Media and Communication. First Edition by Daniel Chandler and Rod Munday. Oxford University Press Inc. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press.  College of Saint Benedict/Saint John's University.  17 January 2012  

http://www.oxfordreference.com/views/ENTRY.html?subview=Main&entry=t326.e2539


Our definition is

Our definition is:

  • social media   A broad category or genre of communications media which occasion or enable social interaction among groups of people, whether they are known to each other or strangers, localized in the same place or geographically dispersed. It included new media such as newsgroups, MMOGs, and social networking sites. Such media can be though of metaphorically as virtual meeting places which function to occasion the exchange of media content among users who are both producers and consumers. Social media have also become adopted as a significant marketing tool.


Our text might be

Our text might be:

While the definition of social media is a slippery work in progress, the best recent attempt may be in the Oxford University Press 2011 A Dictionary of Media and Communication:

A broad category or genre of communications media which occasion or enable social interaction among groups of people, whether they are known to each other or strangers, localized in the same place or geographically dispersed.... Social media have also become adopted as a significant marketing tool. (Social Media)


Different style require different citation formats

Differentstylerequire different citation formats.


Mla format

MLA Format

Works Cited

“Social Media.” A Dictionary of Media and Communication. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. Oxford Reference Online.

Web. 18 January 2012.


Apa format

APA Format

References

Social media. (2011) In D. Chandler and R. Munday (Eds.), A Dictionary of media and communication. Retrieved from http://www.oxfordreference.com


Chicago format

Chicago Format

Bibliography

Daniel Chandler and Rod Munday. A Dictionary of Media and Communication. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011) s.v. “Social Media.” http://www.oxfordreference.com.


Plagiarism don t do it

In addition to the bibliography format, Chicago style has several variations. If you are to use this style, your instructor will give you the instructions you need.


The next source is

The next source is:

A survey of social media use, motivation and leadership among public relations practitioners.

By Kaye D. Sweetser and Tom Kelleher

Public Relations Review

Vol. 37, Issue 4

November 2011

Pages 425-428

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pubrev.2011.08.010


The text of the conclusion we want to paraphrase is

The text of the conclusion we want to paraphrase is:

The data from this study clearly show that motivation matters. Leaders in public relations should be cognizant of motivation when trying to cultivate their subordinates. A keen awareness of what is motivating someone with regard to using social media will provide leaders with better tools for helping grow future leaders. Given the importance of internal motivation, it may make just as much sense to look for a social media enthusiast to practice public relations as it does to try to “convert” a non-motivated public relations person to handle an organization's social media efforts.

In finding and developing a social media strategist it is important to acknowledge the role of motivation. Within our sample, internal motivation correlated positively with Twitter rank, grade, and percentile. In general, those who were more successful were more internally motivated.


A paraphrase

A Paraphrase:

In their survey of social media use in public relations Sweetser and Kelleher conclude that the organizational leader without personal motivation leads by a) recognizing that fact, and b) identifying and cultivating the enthusiasm of a subordinate for those activities. In such cases, effective leadership is not about using social media, but motivating and rewarding those that do so effectively (427-428).


The next source is1

The next source is:

Listening to See: The Key to Virtual Leadership.

By Karlene M. Kerfoot

Nursing Economics

Vol. 28 Issue 2

Mar/Apr 2010

Pages 114-116 http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=49802812&site=ehost-live


The text is

The text is:

In vibrant communities, divergent thinking and a sense of belonging to a larger community as well as the local group creates excitement. This creates a rhythm that is based on a shared vision, regular teleconferences, Web site activity, and knowledge sharing. Social media such as blogging, Twitter, instant messaging, wikis, smart phones, and organizational and individual Facebook technologies help create this sense of aliveness and connectedness in virtual groups. (p.115)


A summary

A Summary:

One thing most everyone agrees on about social media is that, at its best, it is about creating community. Whereas Sweetser and Kelleher wrote about using it to connect with those outside the organization, Karlene Kerfoot’s essay in Nursing Economics explains how important social media can be for internal management of a virtual organization (115).


The next source is2

The next source is:

Daunting Realities of Leading Complicated by the New Media: Wounding and Community College Presidents

By Patricia Maslin-Ostrowski, Deborah L. Floyd, Michael R. Hrabak.

Community College Journal of Research & Practice

Vol. 35 Issue 1/2

January 2011

Pages 29-42


The text is1

The text is:

Community college presidential leadership is more taxing than ever; leaders face unprecedented economic declines, increased expectations, and the immediacy of media reporting. The smallest of rumors can escalate into campaigns for good or ill within minutes via the Internet, social media (such as blogs, Twitter, Facebook) and electronic news. . . .The leader stories reveal how the daunting realities of leading can be complicated in the digital era. . . .


Transition sentence to new section

Transition sentence to new section:

However, despite the general enthusiasm in articles like Kerfoot’s, the short history of social media is fraught with stories of mistakes and disasters.


Summary with quotations

Summary with quotations:

One interesting recent analysis consists of interviews with four community college presidents asking them to describe how a crisis of leadership played out in relation to new media. Their stories tell of being blindsided by misinformation, personal attacks, loss of authority, and shock or outrage at their inability to constrain or correct the former. The authors observe that social media is changing the rules of the public relations game. One of the anonymous presidents interviewed was quoted as saying “You can’t control the story. The story has legs . . . snowballs.’’ She lamented how the Internet had ‘‘picked up’’ the story, and that ‘‘the blogs were heating up fast and furious, Associated Press and CNN. . . A story never dies if it’s on the Internet . . . What occurred in the past does not get to be bygones.’ (Maslin-Ostrowski 39)


Different style require different citation formats1

Differentstylerequire different citation formats.


Mla format1

MLA Format:

Works Cited

Maslin-Ostrowski, Patricia, Deborah L. Floyd, and Michael R. Hrabak. "Daunting Realities Of Leading Complicated By The New Media: Wounding And Community College Presidents." Community College Journal of Research & Practice 35.1/2 (2011): 29-42. Academic Search Premier. Web. 19 Jan. 2012.


Apa format1

APA Format:

References

Maslin-Ostrowski, P., Floyd, D. L., & Hrabak, M. R. (2011). Daunting Realities of Leading Complicated by the New Media: Wounding and Community College Presidents. Community College Journal of Research & Practice, 35(1/2), 29-42. doi:10.1080/10668926.2010.526050


Chicago format1

Chicago Format:

Bibliography

Maslin-Ostrowski, Patricia, Deborah L. Floyd, and Michael R. Hrabak. "Daunting Realities of Leading Complicated by the New Media: Wounding and Community College Presidents." Community College Journal of Research & Practice 35, no. 1/2 (January 2011): 29-42. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed January 19, 2012).


Still need help

Still need help?

  • Talk to your faculty

  • Visit the Writing Center (available on each campus)

  • Ask a Reference Librarian

    Ask – don’t guess –don’t plagiarize!


  • Login