A framework to move from common core to classroom practice
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A framework to move from common core to classroom practice November 25-26, 2013 Kentucky Intro and Session B (Revisit LDC). Overview of the Sessions. Norms. What are some working agreements you would request of all participants to make today as productive as possible?. Schedule for the Day.

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A framework to move from common core to classroom practice November 25-26, 2013 Kentucky Intro and Session B (Revisit LDC)

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A framework to move from common core to classroom practice november 25 26 2013 kentucky intro and session b revisit ldc

A framework to move from common core to classroom practice

November 25-26, 2013

Kentucky

Intro and Session B (Revisit LDC)


Overview of the sessions

Overview of the Sessions


Norms

Norms

  • What are some working agreements you would request of all participants to make today as productive as possible?


Schedule for the day

Schedule for the Day

  • Welcome and Overview of Day (9:00 – 9:15)

  • Break Out Sessions (9:15 – 11:30)

    • Session A – New to LDC

    • Session B – Revisiting LDC

  • Lunch (11:30-12:45)

  • Instructional Strategies for Mini Tasks (12:45-1:00)

  • GIST Strategy (1:00 – 1:15)

  • R-GroupSpace – Module Creator - What’s New (1:15 – 1:45)

  • Work Session: Writing an LDC Module (1:45 – 3:00)


Outcomes for the day

Outcomes for the Day

  • Understand how the LDC Framework is a strategy to bring the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) into classroom practice

  • Extend understanding of writing a strong teaching task

  • Deepen understanding of the formative teaching and learning system in Section 3: What Instruction

  • Identify instructional strategies to use for mini tasks in Reading, Writing and Bridging to Writing Clusters of Section 3: What Instruction


A framework to move from common core to classroom practice november 25 26 2013 kentucky intro and session b revisit ldc

Instructional Shifts Required by the Common Core

  • Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction and informational text

  • Practicing regularly with complex textand its academic vocabulary

  • Reading, writing, speaking and listening grounded in evidence from texts

  • Increasing rigor and relevance

  • Sharing responsibility of teaching reading and writing across content areas

  • Emphasizing 3 modes of academic writing


A framework to move from common core to classroom practice november 25 26 2013 kentucky intro and session b revisit ldc

LDC

Is Not

Is

an instructional strategy

a framework

  • a program

  • a set of materials


Breakout sessions

Breakout Sessions

9:15 – 11:30

Session A – New to LDC

Session B – Revisiting LDC


Revisiting ldc a deeper dive

Revisiting LDC… A Deeper Dive

Session B


Objectives for this morning s session

Objectives for This Morning’s Session

  • Discuss what is new with LDC

  • Discuss balance in “Balanced Literacy”

  • Deepen an understanding of effective teaching tasks

  • Develop an understanding of Close Active Reading with Text Dependent Questioning

  • Discuss the role of writing in reading instruction


Overview of the ldc framework

Overview of the LDC Framework


A framework to move from common core to classroom practice november 25 26 2013 kentucky intro and session b revisit ldc

A Look at LDC in the Classroom

Literacy Matters http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O5EnOVjRPGI


What s new with ldc

What’s New with LDC?


Template tasks

Template Tasks

  • Upper Elementary

  • K-2

  • Collection 2

  • Educurious Science


Strong teaching tasks

Strong Teaching Tasks:

  • Are worthy of 2, 3 or 4 weeks of instruction

  • Ask students to grapple with important content to the discipline

  • Provide opportunities to read informational text of appropriate text complexity and content specific to the grade level

  • Have students working in the most effective mode of discourse/text structure

  • Evolve from a rigorous text-dependent task directly related to the content being taught

  • Involve products written for an authentic audiences

  • Important Note:

  • Engage students in a balanced set of writing tasks over the course of the year


Teaching task considerations

Teaching Task Considerations

  • Discipline specific

  • Mode of writing aligns with template

  • Mode of writing aligns with essential question

  • Keeping true to the words in the template

  • Argument having two sides

  • Begin with essential question or the template itself

  • Remain unbiased


Sample task 1 social studies grade 9

Sample Task 1 Social Studies – Grade 9

Task 14 – Informational/Description

[Insert question]After reading ________ (literature or informational texts), write ________ (essay, report, or substitutes) that describes ________ (content) and addresses the question. Support your discussion with evidence from the text(s).

Are effects of colonialism in Africa still seen today? After reading informational texts, write an essay in which you describe current issues of AIDS, hunger, genocide in Africa. Support your discussion with evidence from the texts.


Sample task 2 science kindergarten

Sample Task 2Science – Kindergarten

EC3 – Informational/Description

After reading _____ (informational texts) on _________ (content), draw*/write a _________ (report or substitute) that describes __________ (content). Use what you know from _________ (text) to draw*write your response.

Worms are amazing animals. After reading silly stories about worms, draw and write a labeled diagram that describes characteristics, homes, eating habits, and interesting facts about worms. Color your picture.


Sample task 3 ela grade 7

Sample Task 3ELA – Grade 7

2 – Argumentative/Analysis

(Insert question.) After reading ______________ write ____________ that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the texts. L2 Be sure to include competing views. L3 Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position.

Which is a more effective strategy for schools to adopt to positively impact a healthy lifestyle for adolescents: Increasing physical activity within the school day or decreasing unhealthy foods within the school day? After reading informational texts and multimedia resources, write an essay that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the texts.


Looking at an ldc module

Looking at an LDC Module

  • What task?

  • What skills?

  • What instruction?

  • What results?

    Mother to Son


Brainstorming session

Brainstorming Session

  • What are some other rigorous, authentic products in addition to essays?

  • What could/should a narrative product look like in LDC?


Section 3 what instruction intentional reading instruction

Section 3: What InstructionIntentional Reading Instruction


Revisiting gradual release of responsibility

Revisiting Gradual Release Of Responsibility


A framework to move from common core to classroom practice november 25 26 2013 kentucky intro and session b revisit ldc

The teaching of reading is a complex, multilayered effort that requires the orchestration of a myriad of intentional instructional decisions and a variety of instructional techniques…. Organized around the gradual release of responsibility, a comprehensive literacy framework serves as a roadmap to assure teachers provide all students opportunities for the modeling, guided practice, and independent practice necessary to acquire the new and higher-level skills that will allow them to master grade-level text.  

- Aspen 2012


Revisiting gradual release of responsibility close reading with text dependent questions

Revisiting Gradual Release Of ResponsibilityClose Reading withText Dependent Questions


Close reading

Reading closely is the ultimate goal of all reading instruction.

Close Reading:


Close reading lessons

‘Close Reading Lessons’

  • Analysis of a short piece of complex text

  • Multiple readings

  • Multiple instructional lessons

  • Use of text-based questions and discussion

  • Allow for some productive struggling with text

  • Guidance to assist students in closely and actively reading, comprehending and appreciating the text


Additional considerations

Additional Considerations

  • Close Reading should be a component of a comprehensive literacy framework.

  • Close Reading strategy should be implemented across content areas.

  • Close Reading lessons are intentionally employed.

  • Close Reading builds skills and motivation in the reader.


Text complexity

Text Complexity

It is important that we have a solid understanding of text complexity and text dependent questions.

  • Quantitative Measures

  • Qualitative Characteristics

  • Considerations of Readers and Task


Quantitative dimensions

Quantitative Dimensions

…refer to those aspects of text complexity, such as word length or frequency, sentence length, and text cohesion, that are difficult … for a human reader to evaluate efficiently… and are thus today typically measured by computer software


Qualitative characteristics

Qualitative Characteristics

…refer to those aspects of text complexity best measured or only measurable by an attentive human reader, such as levels of meaning or purpose; structure; language conventionality and clarity; and knowledge demands.

  • Levels of Meaning (literary texts) or Purpose (informational texts)

  • Structure

  • Language Conventionality and Clarity

  • Knowledge Demands: Life Experiences (literary texts)

  • Knowledge Demands: Cultural/Literary Knowledge (literary texts)

  • Knowledge Demands: Content/Discipline Knowledge (informational texts)


Matching reader and task

Matching Reader and Task

…variables specific to particular readers (such as motivation, knowledge, and experiences) and to particular tasks (such as purpose and the complexity of the task assigned and the questions posed) must also be considered… Such assessments are best made by teachers employing their professional judgment, experience, and knowledge of their students and the subject.


Text complexity and the ccss

Text Complexity and the CCSS

  • http://vimeo.com/27251914


Resources to find out more about text complexity

Resources to Find Out More About Text Complexity

  • http://www.aspendrl.org/

  • http://achievethecore.org

  • http://www.engageny.org

  • http://lexile.com/analyzer/


Close reading of text

Close Reading of Text

  • Implementing the Common Core State Standards: A Primer on Close Reading of Text

    • By Sheila Brown and Lee Kappes


Professional reading

Professional Reading

  • Close Reading Defined

    • How is ‘Close Reading’ defined in this section? Define it now in your own words.

    • What is the goal of a teacher using Close Reading?

    • How is Close Reading considered to be a way of thinking?

    • What do you now know about the characteristics of a Close Reading lesson?


Close reading demonstration lesson

Close Reading – Demonstration Lesson

  • The Dinner Party

    • By Mona Gardner


Debrief the lesson

Debrief the Lesson

  • What did you notice…

    • … the teacher do and say?

    • … the students would do and say?


Close reading lessons1

Close Reading Lessons

  • Targeted standards are identified

  • Focus on short piece (or portion) of complex text

  • Individual reading of the text

  • Group reading aloud

  • Multiple reads for multiple purposes

  • Text-dependent questions

  • Discourse among students

  • Writing about the task


Planning

Planning

  • Read for overall meaning – independently

  • Read whole group

  • Paraphrase

  • Text dependent questions

  • Vocabulary

  • Culminating task


Alice s adventure in wonderland

Alice’s Adventure in Wonderland

  • Read the excerpt


Targeting standards

Targeting Standards

  • Close Reading lessons will target Reading standards 1 & 10

  • Review reading standards 2-9

  • Which could you be targeting in this lesson?


Paraphrasing

Paraphrasing

  • Which sections of this text would be most effective to paraphrase?

  • Why?

  • Select one section to paraphrase yourself.


Text dependent questions

Text-Dependent Questions

- a strategy to support students in reading closely


A framework to move from common core to classroom practice november 25 26 2013 kentucky intro and session b revisit ldc

Text-Dependent Questions

  • Increasing rigor and relevance

  • Sharing responsibility of teaching reading and writing across content areas

  • Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction and informational text

  • Reading, writing, speaking and listening grounded in evidence from texts

  • Practicing regularly with complex text and its academic vocabulary

  • Emphasizing 3 modes of academic writing


Why stay in the text

Why Stay In the Text?

  • Departing from the text in classroom discussion privileges only those who already have experience with the topic.

  • It is easier to talk about our experiences than to analyze the text—especially for students reluctant to engage with reading.

  • The CCSS are College and Career Readiness Standards.


Text dependent questions are not

Text-Dependent Questions are Not…

  • Low-level, literal, or recall questions

  • Focused on comprehension strategies

  • Just questions…


Text dependent questions1

Text Dependent Questions…

  • Are questions that can only be answered with evidence from the text

  • Can be literal but can also involve analysis, synthesis, evaluation

  • Focus on word, sentence and paragraph as well as larger ideas, themes or events

  • Focus on difficult portions of text in order to enhance reading proficiency

  • Do not rely on students possessing background knowledge or experiences to answer


Non examples and examples

What makes Casey’s experiences at bat humorous?

What can you infer from King’sletter about the letter that he received?

“The Gettysburg Address” mentions the year 1776. According to Lincoln’s speech, why is this year significant to the events described in the speech?

Non-Examples and Examples

Not Text-Dependent

Text-Dependent

In “Casey at the Bat,” Casey strikes out. Describe a time when you failed at something.

In “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” Dr. King discusses nonviolent protest. Discuss, in writing, a time when you wanted to fight against something that you felt was unfair.

In “The Gettysburg Address” Lincoln says the nation is dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Why is equality an important value to promote?


Creating text dependent questions

Creating Text-Dependent Questions

  • Identify the core understandings & key ideas of the text.

  • Determine reading standard(s) being targeted

  • Start small to build confidence.

  • Target vocabulary and text structure.

  • Tackle tough sections head-on.

  • Create coherent sequence of text-dependent questions.


Alice s adventure in wonderland1

Alice’s Adventure in Wonderland

  • Work with a partner to create text-dependent questions


Non text dependent questions

Non-Text Dependent Questions

  • Are books without pictures or conversations useful?

  • How would you react if you saw a talking rabbit?

  • Would Alice have followed the rabbit down the hole had she not seen it look at a watch?

  • What do you know about Lewis Carroll?


3 types of text dependent questions

3 Types of Text-Dependent Questions

When you're writing or reviewing a set of questions,consider the following three categories:

  • Questions that assess themes and central ideas

  • Questions that assess knowledge of vocabulary

  • Questions that assess syntax and structure


1 themes and central ideas core understanding and key ideas

1 - Themes and Central Ideas:Core Understanding and Key Ideas

  • Reverse-engineered or backwards-designed

  • Crucial for creating an overarching set of successful questions

  • Critical for creating an appropriate culminating assignment


Alice s adventure in wonderland2

Alice’s Adventure in Wonderland

  • What text dependent questions might be created to assess the theme or central idea?

    • interactions of characters

    • important events


2 vocabulary

2 - Vocabulary

Which words should be taught?

  • Essential to understanding text

  • Likely to appear in future reading

    Which words should get more time and attention?

  • More abstract words

  • Words which are part of semantic word family

  • persist vs. checkpoint

  • noticed vs. accident

  • secure, securely, security, secured


Alice s adventure in wonderland3

Alice’s Adventure in Wonderland

  • What vocabulary words could be targeted?

    • Abstract words

    • Word families

    • Multiple meaning words


3 syntax

3 - Syntax

  • Syntax can predict student performance as much as vocabulary does.

  • Questions and tasks addressing syntax are powerful.

  • Example:

    • Who are the members of the wolf pack? How many wolves are in the pack? To answer this, pay close attention to the use of commas and semi-colons in the last paragraph on pg. 377. The semi-colons separate or list each member in the pack.


3 structure

3 - Structure

Text-dependent questions can be crafted to point students’ attention to features of text that enhance understanding


Alice s adventure in wonderland4

Alice’s Adventure in Wonderland

When thinking about the syntax and structure of this text, what sections could be targeted for text-dependent questions?


Text dependent questions2

Text Dependent Questions

  • Why wasn’t Alice “burning with curiosity”

    when she initially saw the rabbit? What

    subsequent events led to her feeling

    this way?

  • In the opening paragraph Alice states

    “what is the use of a book… without

    pictures or conversation?” What does

    that sentence reveal about her?


Text dependent questions3

Text Dependent Questions

  • What details about the rabbit catch

    Alice’s eye in the third paragraph?

  • Around what word does the meaning of

    the third paragraph pivot? How does that

    change the initial meaning of the paragraph

    and channel it in a new direction?


Culminating task exit slip

Culminating Task / Exit Slip

  • Should relate to core understanding and key ideas.

  • A coherent sequence of textdependent questions will scaffold students toward successfully completing the culminating task.


Goal and strategy

Goal and Strategy

  • Outcome = Students reading closely

  • Strategy = Text dependent questioning


Looking at an ldc module with close reading lessons

Looking at an LDC Module with Close Reading Lessons:

  • What task?

  • What skills?

  • What instruction?

  • What results?

    Mother to Son


What does close reading look and sound like in the classroom

What Does Close Reading Look and Sound Like in the Classroom?

  • KayceeEckhardt teaching The Lottery

    http://commoncore.americaachieves.org/samplevideo/4f88b96526b6154034000001


Resources about close reading

Resources about Close Reading

  • http://achievethecore.org

  • www.edmodo.com

    • http://www.achievethecore.org/ela-literacy-common-core/aligning-materials/anthology-alignment-project/

  • http://www.aspendrl.org/

  • http://www.engageny.org


  • Additional thoughts

    Additional Thoughts

    • There is no one right way to have students work with text- dependent questions.

    • Providing for the differing needs of students means providing and scaffolding supports differentially - not asking easier questions or substituting simpler text.

    • Listening and speaking should be built into any sequence of activities along with reading and writing.

      • “Re-read it, think it, talk it, write it”

    • The CCSS require ALL students to read and engage with grade appropriate complex text regularly.


    Discussion questions

    Discussion Questions

    • What resources and structures are necessary?

    • What does a classroom look and sound like when evidence-based reading and writing is a priority?

    • What are the opportunities related to the shift toward evidence-based reading and writing?

    • What are the challenges related to the shift toward evidence-based reading and writing? Brainstorm suggestions to problem-solve.


    Gradual release of responsibility

    Gradual Release of Responsibility

    • Bridging from ‘I Do’ to ‘We Do’ to ‘You Do’

    • Bridging from ‘Modeling’ to ‘Guided’ to ‘Independent Practice’

    • Bridging from ‘To’ to ‘With’ to ‘By’


    Questions

    Questions


    Feel free to be in touch

    Feel free to be in touch…

    Jody [email protected]


    Lunch time

    Lunch Time


    Welcome back together

    Welcome Back Together!


    Schedule for the day1

    Schedule for the Day

    • Welcome and Overview of Day (9:00 – 9:15)

    • Break Out Sessions (9:15 – 11:30)

      • Session A – New to LDC

      • Session B – Revisiting LDC

    • Lunch (11:30-12:45)

    • Instructional Strategies for Mini Tasks (12:45-1:00)

    • GIST Strategy (1:00 – 1:15)

    • R-GroupSpace – Module Creator - What’s New (1:15 – 1:45)

    • Work Session: Writing an LDC Module (1:45 – 3:00)


    Questions1

    Questions


    Support requests

    Support Requests

    • Per Table

    • Please print neatly


    Collegial sharing of best practices

    Collegial Sharing of Best Practices

    • Give One – Get One

    • Quick Write – Instructional Strategy for:

    • Preparing for the Task

    • Developing Vocabulary

    • Active Reading and Note-Taking

    • Bridging Conversation from Reading to Writing

    • Writing, Planning and Development

    • Revision and Editing


    Mini task alignment

    Mini-Task Alignment

    • Skill and Definition (from Section 2)

    • Instructional Strategies

    • Prompt

    • Product

    • Scoring Guide

    • Pacing


    A framework to move from common core to classroom practice november 25 26 2013 kentucky intro and session b revisit ldc

    GIST

    The word gist is defined as "the main or essential part of a matter."

    How is LDC a strategy for

    implementing the Common Core?

    Write the GIST in EXACTLY 25 words!


    Exploring r groupspace

    Exploring R-GroupSpace


    Questions2

    Questions


    Feel free to be in touch1

    Feel free to be in touch…

    Jody [email protected]

    [email protected]


    Work session

    Work Session


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