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Minnesota Wing Aircrew Training: O-2107. Prepare for a Trip to a Remote Mission Base. What’s the Rush?. Why do we go to so much trouble to train mission aircrew members and encourage members to spend the time it takes to stay proficient?

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Minnesota Wing Aircrew Training: O-2107

Prepare for a Trip to a Remote Mission Base


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What’s the Rush?

  • Why do we go to so much trouble to train mission aircrew members and encourage members to spend the time it takes to stay proficient?

  • Time is such a critical factor in missing person or aircraft crash searches

  • Treat every minute after you been alerted as critical to the survival chances of the victims


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Survival Rates

  • Of the 29% who survive a crash, 60% will be injured:

    • 81% will die if not located within 24 hours

    • 94% will die if not located within 48 hours

  • Of those 40% uninjured in the crash:

    • 50% will die if not located within 72 hours

    • Survival chances diminish rapidly after 72 hours


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Response Times

  • Average time from the aircraft being reported missing to AFRCC notification:

    • 15.6 hours if no flight plan was filed

    • 3.9 hours if a VFR flight plan was filed

    • 1.1 hours if an IFR flight plan was filed

  • Average time from the aircraft being reported missing (LKP) to CAP locating and recovering:

    • 62.6 hours if no flight plan was filed

    • 18.2 hours if a VFR flight plan was filed

    • 11.5 hours if an IFR flight plan was filed


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What’s the Rush?

  • What do these statistics tell us?

    • We must take each mission seriously!

    • Strive to do everything better, smarter and faster!

  • Training, practice and pre-planning help us accomplish these goals

  • Also tells us, as pilots, to always file a flight plan


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Leaving Home Base

  • Proper uniforms per CAPM 39-1

  • Required credentials

  • Current charts for the entire trip (gridded, if you have them)

  • Personal supplies and money

  • Equipment such as cell phone and flashlights (including spare batteries)

  • Charts and maps


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Leaving Home Base

  • Check the Weight and balance, CO monitor & Fire Extinguisher status, fuel reserve and management plan, Discrepancy Log

  • Tie-downs, chocks, Pitot cover and engine plugs

  • Equipment such as fuel tester, survival kit, binoculars, sick sacks, and cleaning supplies


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Leaving Home Base

  • Obtain briefing and file FAA Flight Plan

  • Complete “Inbound” 104 and get released by Mission FRO


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Leaving Home Base“IMSAFE”

  • Illness

  • Medication

  • Stress

  • Alcohol

  • Fatigue

  • Emotion


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FROChecklist(60-1)



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Crew Duty Limitations

  • Duty day rules apply to scanners and observers as well as pilots (CAPR 60-1)

    • 14 hour duty day max

      • Duty Day is defined as beginning when reporting to work or the CAP activity, whichever occurs first. It ends at engine shut down.

    • 8 scheduled flight hours within a duty day max

    • Under no circumstances will flight time exceed 10 hours

    • 10 hours rest between duty days minimum


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Preflight

  • Check the aircraft: Pre-flight (e.g., CAPF 71, CAP Aircraft Inspection Checklist)

  • Check the date and starting Tach & Hobbs times to ensure you won't exceed:

    • mid-cycle oil change (40-60 hours, not to exceed four months)

    • 100-hour/Annual

    • 24-month Transponder inspection, Pitot-Static system inspection, Altimeter calibration, & ELT inspection/Battery replacement date

    • 30-day VOR check for IFR flight

  • Check the AD compliance list

  • Fill in the CAP flight log


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Preflight

  • Check the Discrepancy Log; ensure no discrepancy makes the aircraft unsafe for flight or reduces your ability to accomplish the mission

  • Verify any outstanding discrepancies during your aircraft preflight. If new discrepancies are discovered, log them and ensure the aircraft is still airworthy and mission ready

  • During loading, ensure that all supplies and equipment correspond to what you used in your Weight & Balance

  • Windshield and windows are clean, and that the chocks, tie-downs, and Pitot tube covers/engine plugs are stowed

  • Check and test special equipment


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Preflight

  • Check parking area for obstacles, arrange for marshaller or wing-walker

  • The mission pilot will perform the passenger briefing and review the emergency egress procedure. The pilot should also brief the crew on the fuel management plan and assumptions, and assign responsibility for inquiring about fuel status once an hour.

  • The pilot will review the taxi plan and taxiway diagram, and assign crew responsibilities for taxi

  • Once everyone is settled in, organize the cockpit and review the "Engine Fire on Start" procedure


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Departure

  • Always use the checklists; use the challenge/response method

  • Seat belts and shoulder harness (always <1000 AGL)

  • Collision avoidance! An increasing number of taxi mishaps are the number one trend in CAP. Investigations reveal that pilots are: straying from designated taxi routes, not allowing adequate clearance, not considering the tail and wings during turns, taxiing too fast for conditions, taxiing with obscured visibility, distracted by cockpit duties, and not using other crewmembers to ensure clearance.


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Departure

  • CAPR 60-1 taxi rules:

    • Taxi no faster than a slow walk when within 10 feet of obstacles

    • Maintain at least 50' behind light single-engine aircraft, 100' behind small multi-engine and jet aircraft, and 500' behind heavies and taxiing helicopters

  • Go over the crew assignments for takeoff and departure and make sure each crewmember knows in which direction they should be looking during each.

  • Remind the crew that midair collisions are most likely to occur in daylight VFR conditions within five miles of an airport at or below 3,000’ AGL! This means that most midair collisions occur in or near the traffic pattern. Since the pilot has only one set of eyes, this (and aircraft design) leaves several 'blind spots' that the observer and scanner must cover -- particularly between your 4 and 8 o'clock positions.


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Departure

  • Be sure and include the DF unit's Alarm light self-test in your scan during startup. The light should blink for several seconds; if it doesn't your unit may be inoperative.

  • Ensure that the DF, Audio Panel and FM radio are set up properly. If possible, perform an FM radio check. Select your initial VOR radial(s) and GPS setting (e.g., destination or flight plan).

  • Obtain ATIS and Clearance (read back all clearances and hold-short instructions). Then verify the crosswind limitation. Set up the navigational instruments (e.g., VOR radials and GPS destination, entry points and waypoints)

  • Once you begin taxiing, check your brakes


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Departure

  • Sterile cockpit rules are now in effect

  • Keep the checklist close at hand, open to Emergency Procedures

  • Check for landing aircraft before taking the active

  • At takeoff, start the Observer Log with the time and Hobbs for "Wheels Up“

  • The FAA's "operation lights on" encourages pilots to keep aircraft lights on when operating within 10 miles of an airport, or wherever flocks of birds may be expected

  • While departing the airport environs practice collision avoidance and maintain the sterile cockpit until well clear of traffic and obstacles. Shallow S-turns and lifting a wing before turns may be used to check for traffic. The crew must keep each other appraised of conflicting aircraft and obstacles


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Arrival at Mission Base

  • Obtain ATIS (or AWOS) as soon as possible. May be able to contact mission base on FM radio.

  • Review taxi plan/airport taxi diagram and make crew assignments for approach, landing and taxi

  • Make sure each crewmember knows in which direction they should be looking during each. Remind the crew that midair collisions are most likely to occur in daylight VFR conditions within five miles of an airport at or below 3,000’ AGL! This means that most midair collisions occur in the traffic pattern, with over half occurring on final approach

  • Sterile cockpit rules are now in effect


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Arrival at Mission Base

  • Practice collision avoidance by turning the aircraft exterior lights on when within 10 miles of the airport.

  • Read back all clearances and hold-short instructions

  • Defer after-landing checks until clear

  • Log and report "Wheels Down"

  • Watch for Marshallers and follow their directions, signal Ignition Switch OFF (hold keys out the window) so they can chock



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Arrival at Mission Base

  • Secure the aircraft:

    • Avionics/Control lock, Master Switch OFF

    • Tie-downs, chocks, Pitot tube cover and engine plugs

    • Close windows, Fuel Selector Switch in 'Right' or 'Left,' and Parking Brake OFF; remove personal items and special equipment; lock the doors and baggage compartment.

  • Oil & fuel, clean windows and leading edges

  • Close FAA flight plan, call FRO

  • Check aircrew and aircraft into the mission

  • Complete “Inbound” 104

  • Get sortie assignment

  • Determine food and lodging


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