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Vocabulary Instruction: A Source-Based Approach www.ablongman.com/nilsen. By Alleen Pace Nilsen and Don L. F. Nilsen. ASSUMPTIONS OF OUR SOURCE-BASED APPROACH TO VOCABULARY INSTRUCTION: WE ARE TEACHING THINKING SKILLS—A RECOGNITION OF PATTERNS AND RELATIONSHIPS.

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Vocabulary instruction a source based approach www ablongman com nilsen l.jpg

Vocabulary Instruction:A Source-Based Approachwww.ablongman.com/nilsen

By Alleen Pace Nilsen

and Don L. F. Nilsen


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  • ASSUMPTIONS OF OUR SOURCE-BASED APPROACH TO VOCABULARY INSTRUCTION:

  • WE ARE TEACHING THINKING SKILLS—A RECOGNITION OF PATTERNS AND RELATIONSHIPS.

  • STUDENTS NEED TIME TO ABSORB THE MEANINGS OF WORDS AND TO MAKE CONNECTIONS—THIS IS ONE OF THE REASONS THAT WE PLAN ACTIVITIES AND A HANDS-ON APPROACH.

  • IT IS BETTER FOR STUDENTS TO FEEL SUCCESSFUL THAN UNSUCCESSFUL


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  • WORKING IN LITTLE GROUPS IS A GOOD WAY TO GIVE STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.

  • WE PURPOSELY INCLUDE A MIXTURE OF WELL KNOWN AND NEW WORDS.

  • OF COURSE READING IS A GOOD WAY TO IMPROVE ONE’S VOCABULARY, BUT MOSTLY CHILDREN LEARN ONLY A SINGLE MEANING. THE LEMONY SNICKET BOOKS DIFFER IN THAT THE AUTHOR, DANIEL HANDLER, LOVES TO PLAY WITH WORDS AND OFTEN GIVES SEVERAL MEANINGS, E.G.


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  • The Grim Grotto Ch. 7 begins with STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.

  • Theword lousy like the word volunteer, the word fire, the word department, and many other words found in dictionaries and other important documents, has a number of different definitions depending on the exact circumstances in which it is used” (139).

  • Then he goes on to give examples:


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  • “bad” as are the sinister smells coming from STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.Lousy Lane and the lousy journey the children had while climbing Mortmain Mountain.

  • The medical definition of “infested with lice,” which he may have to use if Count Olaf’s hygiene grows worse.

  • The somewhat obscure definition as when it means “abundantly supplied” as is Count Olaf with treacherous plans, the Queequeg submarine with metal pipes, and the whole world with unfathomable secrets.


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Alphabet STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Animals vs. Humans STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Chains and Chain Reactions STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Decks STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Eggs STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Eyes STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Farm Animals STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Forks STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Hands STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Sewing STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Skeleton and Bones STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Sports STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Sticks STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Straw STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Tails STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Tape STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Tools STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Tongue STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Train STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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Watery Animals STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.


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References: STUDENTS PRACTICE IN SAYING THE WORDS.

Belois, Nathan. “Conceptual Metaphor Theory in the L2 Classroom.” Tempe, AZ: Unpublished MA Thesis: Arizona State University, 2007.

Boers, Frank. “Expanding Learners’ Vocabulary through Metaphor Awareness: What Expansion, What Learners, What Vocabulary?” in Eds. M. Archard and S. Niemeir. Cognitive Linguistics, Second Language Acquisition, and Foreign Language Learning. Berlin, Germany: Mouton de Gruyter, 2004, 211-232.

Nilsen, Alleen Pace, and Don L. F. Nilsen. Vocabulary Plus High School and Up: A Source-Based Approach. New York, NY: Allyn and Bacon, 2004.

www.ablongman.com/nilsen

Nilsen, Alleen Pace, and Don L. F. Nilsen. Vocabulary Plus K-8: A Source-Based Approach. New York, NY: Allyn and Bacon, 2004.

www.ablongman.com/nilsen


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