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International Migration Is Reshaping United States, Global Economy. PRB’s 2006 World Population Data Sheet reveals that more migration will occur between developing countries. Population Reference Bureau, Aug. 17, 2006 Bill Butz, president Carl Haub, senior demographer

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International migration is reshaping united states global economy

International Migration Is Reshaping United States, Global Economy

PRB’s 2006 World Population Data Sheet reveals that more migration will occur between developing countries.

Population Reference Bureau, Aug. 17, 2006

Bill Butz, president

Carl Haub, senior demographer

Rachel Nugent, technical director of health and economics

Linda Jacobsen, director of domestic programs

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


In the Developed Countries, There Are Fewer and Fewer Young People, but More and More Elderly.

Population by age and sex, more developed countries, 2005

Source: United Nations, World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision (2005).

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


The Young Population in Developing Countries Has Great Potential for Growth.

Population by age and sex, less developed countries, 2005

Source: United Nations, World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision (2005).

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


Global Population Growth: Potential for Growth.A Developing-Country Phenomenon

World population, 1950-2050 (projected)

Source: United Nations, World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision (2005).

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


A Long Period of Low Birth Rates in Germany Has Resulted in Greatly Reduced Numbers of Youth.

Population by age and sex, Germany, 2005

Source: United Nations, World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision (2005).

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


If Current Fertility and Immigration Rates Continue to 2050, Germany’s Population Will Age Dramatically.

Population by age and sex, Germany, 2050 (if fertility and net migration remain at current levels)

Source: Population Reference Bureau projections.

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


Foreign-Born Populations Are Generally Rising in the Industrialized World …

Percent of population foreign-born, Canada, Ireland, and Spain, 1960-2005

Source: United Nations Population Division.

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


… But Foreign-Born Populations Are Also Rising in the Developing World.

Percent of population foreign-born, Gabon and Malaysia, 1960-2005

Source: United Nations Population Division.

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


Migration within the developing world occurs for many reasons
Migration Within the Developing World Occurs for Many Reasons.

  • Differences in fertility rates

  • Economic conditions

  • Conflict

  • Rural to urban movement

  • Ethnic patterns

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


Today’s ‘Youth Bulge’ Will Become Tomorrow’s Labor Force.

Population by age and sex, Pakistan, 2005 and 2050

Source: United Nations, World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision, CD-ROM Edition, Extended Dataset (2005).

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


South Africa Without AIDS Shows a Typical Developing-Country ‘Youth Bulge’.

Population by age and sex, South Africa, 2020 (under “no AIDS” scenario)

Source: United Nations, World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision, CD-ROM Edition, Extended Dataset (2005).

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


South Africa With AIDS Shows a Loss of Middle-Aged Persons and Females.

Population by age and sex, South Africa, 2020 (under “medium AIDS” scenario)

Source: United Nations, World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision, CD-ROM Edition, Extended Dataset (2005).

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


The World Is Closer to Meeting the Clean-Water Access Target Than the Sanitation Target.

Percent of population with access to improved water and sanitation, 1990-2002, and 2015 MDG targets

Source: UNICEF and WHO, “Country, Regional, and Global Estimates on Water and Sanitation” (2004).

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


Disparities in Access to Sanitation Exist Across Regions and Between Urban and Rural Areas.

Source: UNICEF and WHO, “Country, Regional, and Global Estimates on Water and Sanitation” (2004).

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


Both developed and developing countries create protected areas
Both Developed and Developing Countries Create Protected Areas.

  • Venezuela 63%

  • China, Hong Kong SAR 51%

  • Zambia 42%

  • Liechtenstein 40%

  • Brunei 38%

  • Tanzania 38%

Countries With the Highest Share of Their Surface Area Protected, 2006

Source: UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Center, World Database on Protected Areas (2006).

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


The Number of Foreign-Born in the U.S. Is at an All-Time High, but Their Share of the Total Population is Still Below That of 1910.

Foreign-born population, United States, 1850-2005

Source: U.S. Census Bureau.

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


Natural Increase Still Accounts for Almost 60% of Population Growth in the U.S., but the Share From International Migration Has Been Increasing.

Percent of U.S. population growth due to natural increase and net migration, 1980-2005

Source: U.S. Census Bureau.

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


The Largest Share of Immigrants to the U.S. Still Comes From Latin America, but the Share Coming From Asia Has Increased Substantially Since the 1960s.

Percent of immigrants admitted to the United States, by region of origin, 1961-2004

Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Immigration Statistics, 2004 Yearbook of Immigration Statistics (2005).

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU


In 1990, Almost Half of All U.S. Counties Had Less Than 1% Foreign-Born, and Only One-Tenth Had 5% or More.

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 1990 decennial census.


By 2000, Only One-Fourth of U.S. Counties Had Less Than 1% Foreign-Born, and One in Five Had 5% or More.

© 2006 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 decennial census.


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