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Before we DO assessment we need to THINK ABOUT what we are doing and why we are doing it.

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Before we DO assessment we need to THINK ABOUT what we are doing and why we are doing it. ASSESSMENT. INSTRUCTION. CURRICULUM. In good teaching, curriculum, instruction and assessment are woven together. They are inseparable and as such, give coherence and strength. Fair Assessment.

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

Before we DO assessment we need to THINK ABOUT what

we are doing and why we are doing it.

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ASSESSMENT

INSTRUCTION

CURRICULUM

In good teaching, curriculum, instruction and assessment are woven together. They are inseparable and as such, give coherence and strength.

fair assessment
Fair Assessment
  • performance criteria clearly defined
  • students are involved and informed
  • focuses on student learning
  • formative assessments are not used for grading (assessment for learning)
  • summative assessment is used for grading (assessment of learning)
  • continuous and ongoing
  • meaningful
  • variety of strategies (performance tasks, products, observations, conversations)
too many too much
Too Many, Too Much!
  • Start with the “Big End” In Mind!
  • Cluster the Learning Outcomes
  • Develop Essential Questions
  • Design Backwards
  • Develop an Assessment, Evaluation, Reporting (AER) Plan
  • Align AER with 5 GLO’s
  • Keep it focused and simple!
assessment
Assessment
  • ForLearning – how much the student already knows, doesn’t know, if they are learning
  • As learning – focuses on student involvement and taking responsibility for their learning and assessing
  • Of learning – identifies what students know or do, what they have achieved, shows ranking
backward design steps
Backward Design Steps
  • Content Focus: Choose a topic, skill or game theme, or physical activity/sport
  • Cluster: What is the student expected to know and/or be able to do? Read through grade-specific outcomes and identify the slo’s that are relevant or related to the topic (identify the knowledge outcomes and skill outcomes that fit)
  • Goal(s),KeyUnderstandings, and Essential Questions: Determine the overarching “essential questions” that capture the essence of what the student will learn based on the cluster of outcomes.
  • Assessment Evidence: How is the student going to show “for” and “of” learning? What are the criteria)? Identify the assessment strategy(ies) and tool(s) that will be used as acceptable evidence. For example:
    • Observation: Checklist
    • Performance Task (project): Scoring Rubric
    • Journal entry: Inventory
    • Performance Task (Game): Checklist
  • Learning Experiences: How is the student going to learn it?What learning resources will be used? To what subject area(s) can a connection be made? (within, between, beyond)
  • How will we judge our unit designs?
unit and assessment plan examples

Unit and Assessment Plan Examples

S2 Nutrition Unit

S2 Fitness Unit

S2 Golf Unit

assessment terms

Assessment Terms

People Search

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Why assess?

for instructor

evaluation

to motivate

to predict

to diagnose

to determine a

starting point

for research

for selection

for placement

for grading

students

to improve

learning

for public relations

justification

for change

for program

evaluation

reporting guidelines p 197 framework
Review/develop assessment and reporting policies to align with new integrated PE/HE curriculum at local level

Final marks on report cards are stated as percentages for Grade 6 and up

Reporting Guidelines (p.197 Framework)
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Marks/grades are based on the learning outcomes (the 5 GLO’s)
  • Weighting of marks is determined by the school/teacher with a higher weight on skills
  • Reporting on student learning outcomes that are potentially sensitive is a local decision
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Information that is not reflective of the learning outcomes such as punctuality, attendance, dress and attitude should be reported separately
  • Behaviour can be part of the mark when it is:
    • an integral part of the specific student learning outcomes
    • observable and measurable
    • serves as a performance descriptor
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Fitness testing should not begin before Grade 4
  • Results or scores of fitness tests are reported separately and are not to be part of the final mark
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for students with significant cognitive disabilities, use modifications ( Individual Education Planning: A Handbook for Developing and Implementing IEP’s, Early to Senior Years1998)

for students with special needs and medical problems, use adaptations or accommodations to help students achieve the learning outcomes

underlying perspectives in grading
Underlying Perspectives in Grading
  • Grading is not essential for learning
  • Grading is complicated
  • Grading is subjective and emotional
  • Grading is inescapable
  • Grading has limited research base
  • Grading has no best practice
  • Grading that is faulty damages students …and teachers.
          • Grade for Learning by Ken O’Connor
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