NGOs and Humanitarian Reform

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NGOs and Humanitarian Reform

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1. NGOs and Humanitarian Reform A multi-agency project

2. UN Humanitarian Reform Agenda 3 initial pillars identified in 2005: Improve coordination Improve funding for emergency response Improve leadership Partnership added as de-facto 4th pillar in 2007 The November 2007 external evaluation of the cluster approach reported that the lack of involvement of national NGOs and community-based organisations in the cluster system was one of its ‘most disappointing findings’. National and local NGOs remain absent from most reform fora and even international NGOs often lack the capacity to engage in UN processes in a sustained way.The November 2007 external evaluation of the cluster approach reported that the lack of involvement of national NGOs and community-based organisations in the cluster system was one of its ‘most disappointing findings’. National and local NGOs remain absent from most reform fora and even international NGOs often lack the capacity to engage in UN processes in a sustained way.

3. Improving Coordination - Cluster Approach Aims to enhance operational capacity in several sectoral (cluster) areas Identified leaders (mainly UN agencies, but some NGOs are joint cluster leads) 11 clusters, headed by 10 UN agencies or NGOs There are 11 cluster groups – water and sanitation (UNICEF), health (WHO), nutrition (UNICEF), education (UNICEF/Save the Chldren), shelter (IFRC/UNHCR), early recovery (UNDP), camp management (IOM/UNHCR), logistics (WFP), food security (WFP/FAO), protection (UNICEF), emergency telecommunications (WFP/UNICEF/OCHA)There are 11 cluster groups – water and sanitation (UNICEF), health (WHO), nutrition (UNICEF), education (UNICEF/Save the Chldren), shelter (IFRC/UNHCR), early recovery (UNDP), camp management (IOM/UNHCR), logistics (WFP), food security (WFP/FAO), protection (UNICEF), emergency telecommunications (WFP/UNICEF/OCHA)

4. Improving Funding for Emergency Response – Humanitarian Funding Mechanisms Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) set up March 2006 – No direct access for NGOs Other pooled funds mechanisms such as Common Humanitarian Funds (CHFs) and Emergency Response Funds (ERFs) These funds still have problems relating to their management, accountability and transparency. Transaction costs are often high and sometimes dispersal times are too lengthy.These funds still have problems relating to their management, accountability and transparency. Transaction costs are often high and sometimes dispersal times are too lengthy.

5. Improving Partnerships - Global Humanitarian Platform (GHP) GHP established July 2006 Brings together the three main families of the humanitarian community – NGOs, the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, and the UN and related international organisations Principles of Partnership agreed July 2007 5 Principles of Humanitarian Partnership: Equality Transparency Results-oriented approach Responsibility Complementarity Equality Equality requires mutual respect between members of the partnership irrespective of size and power. The participants must respect each other's mandates, obligations and independence and recognize each other's constraints and commitments. Mutual respect must not preclude organizations from engaging in constructive dissent. Transparency Transparency is achieved through dialogue (on equal footing), with an emphasis on early consultations and early sharing of information. Communications and transparency, including financial transparency, increase the level of trust among organizations. Result-oriented approach Effective humanitarian action must be reality-based and action-oriented. This requires result-oriented coordination based on effective capabilities and concrete operational capacities. Responsibility Humanitarian organizations have an ethical obligation to each other to accomplish their tasks responsibly, with integrity and in a relevant and appropriate way. They must make sure they commit to activities only when they have the means, competencies, skills, and capacity to deliver on their commitments. Decisive and robust prevention of abuses committed by humanitarians must also be a constant effort. Complementarity The diversity of the humanitarian community is an asset if we build on our comparative advantages and complement each other’s contributions. Local capacity is one of the main assets to enhance and on which to build. Whenever possible, humanitarian organizations should strive to make it an integral part in emergency response. Language and cultural barriers must be overcome. Equality Equality requires mutual respect between members of the partnership irrespective of size and power. The participants must respect each other's mandates, obligations and independence and recognize each other's constraints and commitments. Mutual respect must not preclude organizations from engaging in constructive dissent. Transparency Transparency is achieved through dialogue (on equal footing), with an emphasis on early consultations and early sharing of information. Communications and transparency, including financial transparency, increase the level of trust among organizations. Result-oriented approach Effective humanitarian action must be reality-based and action-oriented. This requires result-oriented coordination based on effective capabilities and concrete operational capacities. Responsibility Humanitarian organizations have an ethical obligation to each other to accomplish their tasks responsibly, with integrity and in a relevant and appropriate way. They must make sure they commit to activities only when they have the means, competencies, skills, and capacity to deliver on their commitments. Decisive and robust prevention of abuses committed by humanitarians must also be a constant effort. Complementarity The diversity of the humanitarian community is an asset if we build on our comparative advantages and complement each other’s contributions. Local capacity is one of the main assets to enhance and on which to build. Whenever possible, humanitarian organizations should strive to make it an integral part in emergency response. Language and cultural barriers must be overcome.

6. NGOs and Humanitarian Reform – Project Purpose To strengthen the effective engagement of international, national and local NGOs in humanitarian reform (coordination and financing)

7. Cross-cutting Issues Downward accountability Partnership Improving project impact

8. Project Overview Start date: October 2008 £1.9 million 6 staff: Global Project Manager (GPM) Finance and Administration Officer 4 Humanitarian Reform Officers (HROs) based in 4 primary focus countries

9. Consortium Members ActionAid (lead agency) CAFOD CARE International Rescue Committee ICVA Oxfam Save the Children

10. Consortium Members ActionAid (lead agency) CAFOD CARE International Rescue Committee ICVA Oxfam Save the Children

11. Primary Focus Countries Afghanistan (led by CARE) DRC (Oxfam) Ethiopia (Save the Children) Zimbabwe (ActionAid)

12. Secondary focus countries Haiti Indonesia Lesotho Mozambique Palestine Sudan

13. Project Objectives Improve NGO participation in coordination mechanisms Improve NGO access to reformed humanitarian funding Increase responsiveness to beneficiaries’ needs Increase humanitarian stakeholders’ knowledge of best practice for effective engagement of NGOs in humanitarian reform as per Objectives 1 - 3 Improve international policies related to humanitarian reform (partnership & coordination and reformed humanitarian funding)

14. Work Plan The project will involve 4 phases: Phase 1: Project Inception Phase 2: Mapping and Partnership-Building Phase 3: Innovating and Learning Phase 4: Outreach and Dissemination

15. Activities Develop MoUs/ToRs; recruit staff and consultants for mapping studies Conduct in-depth mapping study in 4 focus countries Collect complementary evidence in 5 secondary countries Record experiences and document best practice Promote shared needs assessments Support and build capacity of national NGOs for humanitarian response Organise beneficiaries’ forums in focus countries Produce best practice newsletter Organise three regional workshops and one international conference International advocacy to UN and donors

16. Project Outputs (1) – Coordination Mechanisms 1a. Improved representation of local, national and international NGOs in coordination mechanisms (i.e. clusters; IASC / Humanitarian Partnership country teams) 1b. Mapping and analysis to identify best practice in humanitarian coordination in 4 focus countries and 5 secondary countries

17. Project Outputs (2) – Humanitarian Funding 2a. Improved capacity of national and international NGOs to access reformed humanitarian funding in 4 focus countries 2b. Mapping and analysis to identify and generate best practices in reformed humanitarian funding in 4 focus countries and 5 secondary countries

18. Project Outputs (3) – Responsiveness to Beneficiaries 3a. Increase in use of common needs assessment frameworks and sharing of needs data in 4 countries 3b. Creation of baseline of beneficiaries’ participation in needs assessments and project implementation, monitoring and evaluation in 4 focus countries

19. Project Outputs (4) – Best Practice 4. Dissemination of best practices (as per objectives 1 -3 ) at local, regional and international level

20. Project Outputs (5) – International Policies 5. Transfer of field-generated knowledge to policy-making at the global level (GHP, IASC, OCHA and Donors)

21. Implications for Country Programme…

22. Thank you!

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