Chapter 9 water resources
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 41

Chapter 9 Water Resources PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 59 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Chapter 9 Water Resources. Geosystems 6e An Introduction to Physical Geography. Robert W. Christopherson Charles E. Thomsen. Chapter 9. You are responsible for pages 245-248 in chapter 9. Water. Constantly cycling through the environment

Download Presentation

Chapter 9 Water Resources

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Chapter 9 water resources

Chapter 9Water Resources

Geosystems 6e

An Introduction to Physical Geography

Robert W. Christopherson

Charles E. Thomsen


Chapter 9

Chapter 9

  • You are responsible for pages 245-248 in chapter 9


Water

Water

  • Constantly cycling through the environment

  • Water spends time in the ocean, the air, on the surface, and underground.

  • Hydrologic Cycle: the circulation and transformation of water through Earth’s atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere.

  • Water-resource management:

    • Wells, reservoirs, dams


Water budget

Water Budget


Chapter 9 water resources

  • 97% of Earth’s water in the ocean, so most precipitation and evaporation takes place there

  • The bulk of global precipitation comes from ocean water


Chapter 9 water resources

  • 86% of all evaporation traced to ocean

  • 14% of all evaporation traced to the land


Transpiration

Transpiration

  • The movement of water vapor through the pores of leaves and into plants through roots from soil moisture.


Evaporation

Evaporation

  • The movement of free water molecules away from a wet surface into the air that is less saturated.


Chapter 9 water resources

  • Water spends 10 days (on average) in the atmosphere

  • Water spends 3,000-10,000 years in deep-ocean circulation, groundwater aquifers, glacial ice


End of chapter 9

End of Chapter 9

Geosystems 6e

An Introduction to Physical Geography

Robert W. Christopherson

Charles E. Thomsen


Chapter 10 global climate systems

Chapter 10Global Climate Systems

Geosystems 6e

An Introduction to Physical Geography

Robert W. Christopherson

Charles E. Thomsen


Climate

Climate

  • Climate is weather averaged over time over broader geographic areas.

  • Usually averaged over 30-yr periods.

  • Climatology is the study of climate over both time and space.

  • One central goal is to determine climatic regions, areas with similar weather statistics.

  • Another central goal is to analyze climate variability over time (like global warming!).


Ecosystems

Ecosystems

  • Climates influence the location of an ecosystem

  • Ecosystem: the natural, self-regulating communities formed by plants and animals in their nonliving environment.

  • Biome: A large terrestrial ecosystem characterized by specific plant communities and formations


Biomes

Biomes

  • Usually named after the predominant vegetation in the region

  • Examples: savanna, forest, grassland, tundra, desert

  • Each biome is a collection of animals, plants, and soils

  • Biomes constantly changing and adapting to changes in climate


Climate classification

Climate Classification

  • Provides an organized and manageable source of information that simplifies rather complex patterns in the real world

  • Also gives us a common short hand way to describe climates quickly and easily

  • By using 2 principal climatic components, temperature and precipitation, general climate types are revealed


Koppen

Koppen

  • Koppen climate classification

  • Developed 1918

  • Developed to correlate the spatial distribution of plants to the spatial distribution of climate

  • The Koppen-Geiger climate classification system is the updated version in your text


K ppen s climate classifications

Köppen’s Climate Classifications

Primary Letters

  • Tropical Climates (A)

    • Average temp of every month > 18ºC

  • Mesothermal Climates (C)

    • Coldest month average temperature < 18ºC but >-3ºC

    • At least 1 month average temperature > 10ºC

  • Microthermal Climates (D)

    • Average temperature of warmest month >10ºC

    • Average temperature of coldest month < -3ºC


K ppen s climate classifications1

Köppen’s Climate Classifications

Primary Letters

  • Polar Climates (E)

    • Average temperature of all months  < 10ºC

  • Dry Arid and Semiarid Climates (B)

    • Evaporation > precipitation

  • Highland (H)


K ppen s climate classifications2

Köppen’s Climate Classifications

Secondary Letters

  • These letters are based primarily on seasonal precipitation:

    • f = adequate rainfall all through the year, no distinct dry season

    • w = winter dry, if 70% or more of annual rainfall occurs in summer

    • s = summer dry, if 70% or more of annual rainfall occurs in winter

    • m = extremely wet summer = monsoon. A climate only.


K ppen s climate classifications3

Köppen’s Climate Classifications

Secondary Letters

  • For B climateonly:

    • S = semiarid = steppe

    • W = arid = desert

    • which results in either BS or BW.

  • For E climateonly:

    • T = tundra

    • F = perpetual frost = permanent ice

    • which results in either ET or EF.


K ppen s climate classifications4

Köppen’s Climate Classifications

Tertiary Letters

  • The third letters in the system are based exclusively on seasonal and annual temperature:

    • a = hot summer, warmest month > 22°C; C and D only

    • b = warm summer, warmest month < 22°C; C and D only

    • c = cool summer, < 4 months over 10°C; C and D only

    • d = very cold winter, coldest month < -38°C; D only

    • h = dry-hot, annual temperature > 18°C; B only

    • k = dry-cold, annual temperature < 18°C; B only


K ppen s climate classifications5

Köppen’s Climate Classifications

Examples of Combinations

  • Af = Tropical Rainforest climate type

  • Am = Tropical Monsoon climate type

  • BWh = Low-Latitude Hot Desert climate type

  • Cfa = Humid Subtropical climate type

  • Csa = Mediterranean climate type

  • Dfb = Humid Continental climate type

  • ET = Tundra climate type


World climate classification

World Climate Classification

Figure 10.5


Tropical climates a

Tropical Climates (A)

  • Tropical Rain Forest Climates (Af)  

  • Tropical Monsoon Climates (Am)  

  • Tropical Savanna Climates (Aw)

  • Consistent daylength and insolation input

    • = consistent warm temperatures

  • Dominance by ITCZ

    • Shifts seasonally with high sun period

  • Warm ocean currents, unstable maritime air masses


Tropical rain forest and monsoon

Tropical Rain Forest and Monsoon


Arid and semiarid climates b

Arid and Semiarid Climates (B)

  • Köppen system:

    • W = Desert (arid), S = Steppe (semiarid)

    • h = hot (mean annual temp > 18°C)

    • usually found in lower latitudes

    • k = cold/cool (mean annual temp < 18°C)

    • usually found in the midlatitudes

  • Low-Latitude Hot Desert Climates (BWh)  

  • Midlatitude Cold Desert Climates (BWk)  

  • Low-Latitude Hot Steppe Climates (BSh)  

  • Midlatitude Cold Steppe Climates (BSk)  


Arid and semiarid climates b1

Arid and Semiarid Climates (B)

  • Potential for evaporation exceeds rainfall

  • Cover 35% of Earth’s surface

  • Most extensive geographically of the major climate groups

  • One-third of U.S. is classified as arid/semiarid


Arid and semiarid climates b2

Arid and Semiarid Climates (B)


Mesothermal climates c

Mesothermal Climates (C)  

  • Humid Subtropical (Hot-Summer) Climates (Cfa)  

  • Humid Subtropical (Winter-Dry) Climates (Cwa)

  • Marine West Coast Climates (Cfb, Cfc)  

  • Mediterranean Dry-Summer Climates (Csa, Csb)  


Mesothermal climates c1

Mesothermal Climates (C)  

  • Humid Subtropical (Hot-Summer) Climates (Cfa) C = warmest month above 10ºC, coldest month above -3ºC = seasonal climates

    • a = hot summer, warmest month above 22ºC

    • f = year-round precipitation

    • w = winter dry (> 70% of rainfall concentrated in summer months)


Mesothermal climates c2

Mesothermal Climates (C)  

  • Humid Subtropical (Winter-Dry) Climates (Cwa) C = warmest month above 10ºC, coldest month above -3ºC = seasonal climates

    • a = hot summer, warmest month above 22ºC

    • w = winter dry (> 70% of rainfall concentrated in summer months)


Mediterranean climates csa csb

Mediterranean Climates (Csa, Csb)

  • Wet winters, dry summers = “s”

  • 70% of precipitation in winter

Marine West Coast Climates

  • Mild winters, cool summers

  • Unusual climates for their latitude, extending close to Arctic Circle.

  • Maritime polar air masses (mP) dominate.


Mesothermal climates c3

Mesothermal Climates (C)  


Microthermal climates d

Microthermal Climates (D)

  • Also called “cool temperate” or “snow climates.”

  • Average temperature of warmest month above 10°C.

  • Average temperature of coldest month below 0°C.

  • Distinct strong seasonality in temperature ranges throughout the year.

  • 21% of land surface in Microthermal climates.

  • Occurs due to continental locations (cP air masses common).

  • In Southern Hemisphere, found only in highlands.


Microthermal climates

Microthermal Climates

  • Humid Continental Hot-Summer Climates

    • Dfa, Dwa

  • Humid Continental Mild-Summer Climates

    • Dfb, Dwb

  • Subarctic Climates

    • Subarctic Cool-Summer: Dfc, Dwc

    • Subarctic Extreme-Winter: Dfd, Dwd


Microthermal climates d1

Microthermal Climates (D)

  • Humid Continental Mild-Summer Climates (Dfb, Dwb)

  • Found poleward of Dfa and Dwa climates.

  • Cold temperatures in winter primarily due to:

    • continental locations

    • higher latitudes

    • cP air masses

  • Less precipitation than hot summer climates

    • Heavier snowfall


Microthermal climates d2

Microthermal Climates (D)

  • Subarctic Climates (Dfc, Dwc, Dwd)

    • Found poleward of Dfb and Dwb climate.

  • Extensive geographically:

    • North America, stretching from Atlantic to Pacific.

    • Eurasia, stretching from Scandinavia to the Pacific.

    • Subarctic extreme-winter found only in eastern Asia

  • Most extreme temperature ranges of all climates

  • Extremely cold temperatures in winter primarily due to:

    • continental locations = Siberian High in winter

    • higher latitudes

    • cP air masses


Microthermal climates d3

Microthermal Climates (D)


Polar and highland climates

Polar and Highland Climates

  • Tundra Climate (ET)

  • Ice Cap and Ice Sheet Climates (EF)

  • Polar Marine Climate (aka “Polar Maritime”) EM

    • More moderate than other two polar climates (why?)

    • No month below -7°C (20°F), but not as warm as tundra climate

    • Low annual range of temperature

    • Exists only along very fringes of highest latitudes

    • Bering Sea (Alaska, Russia), southern Greenland, northern Iceland, Norway)


Polar and highland climates1

Polar and Highland Climates


  • Login