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Lesson Two – What is Art?. FYS 100 Creative Discovery in Digital Art Forms. FORM AND BEAUTY. One must not always think that feeling is everything. Art is nothing without form. Letter to Madame Louise Colet [August 12, 1846], Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880). FORM AND BEAUTY.

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Lesson Two – What is Art?

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Lesson two what is art

Lesson Two – What is Art?

FYS 100 Creative Discovery in Digital Art Forms


Form and beauty

FORM AND BEAUTY

One must not always think that feeling is everything. Art is nothing without form.

Letter to Madame Louise Colet [August 12, 1846],

Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880)


Form and beauty1

FORM AND BEAUTY

Art should be independent of all claptrap—should stand alone, and appeal to the artistic sense of eye and ear, without confounding this with emotions entirely foreign to it, as devotion, pity, love, patriotism, and the like. All these have no kind of concern with it.

The Gentle Art of Making Enemies [1890], Propositions, 2,

James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903)


Form and beauty2

FORM AND BEAUTY

True ease in writing comes from art, not chance,

As those move easiest who have learned to dance.

’Tis not enough no harshness gives offense;

The sound must seem an echo to the sense.

An Essay on Criticism [1711], pt. I, l. 162,

Alexander Pope (1688-1744)


Form and beauty3

FORM AND BEAUTY

a momentary stay against confusion

The Figure A Poem Makes [1939], Robert Frost (1874-1963)


Unique individual and creative

UNIQUE, INDIVIDUAL, AND CREATIVE

There is no science of the beautiful, only a critique of it.

Critique of Judgement [1790], Immanual Kant (1724-1804)


Unique individual and creative1

UNIQUE, INDIVIDUAL, AND CREATIVE

Art is a uniquely human activity that grows out of our inborn impulse to create.

We create things that have no utilitarian purpose.

“All art is quite useless.”

The Critic as Artist [1891],

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900)


Unique individual and creative2

UNIQUE, INDIVIDUAL, AND CREATIVE

Individuality of expression is the beginning and end of all art.

Sprüche in Prosa (Proverbs in Prose),

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)


More true than nature

MORE “TRUE” THAN NATURE

Aristotle believed that art is more true than nature in that it can express the essence of things.


A mediator between man and nature

A MEDIATOR BETWEEN MAN AND NATURE

Now Art, used collectively for painting, sculpture, architecture and music, is the mediatress between, and reconciler of, nature and man. It is, therefore, the power of humanizing nature, of infusing the thoughts and passions of man into everything which is the object of his contemplation.

On Poesy or Art [1818],

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834)


Aligned with truth

ALIGNED WITH TRUTH

Art for art’s sake is an empty phrase. Art for the sake of the true, art for the sake of the good and the beautiful, that is the faith I am searching for.

Letter to Alexandre Saint-Jean [1872],

George Sand [Amandine Aurore Lucie Dupin, Baronne Dudevant] (1804-1876)


Aligned with truth1

ALIGNED WITH TRUTH

Beauty is truth, truth beauty, -- that is all

Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know!

Ode on a Grecian Urn [1819], John Keats


Lesson two what is art

Beauty is truth, truth beauty, -- that is all

Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know!

Ode on a Grecian Urn [1819], John Keats


Revealing communicating and heightening experience

REVEALING, COMMUNICATING, AND HEIGHTENING EXPERIENCE

Art is a human activity consisting in this, that one man consciously, by means of certain external signs, hands on to others feelings he has lived through, and that other people are infected by these feelings and also experience them.

What is Art? [1896],

Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910)


Revealing communicating and heightening experience1

REVEALING, COMMUNICATING, AND HEIGHTENING EXPERIENCE

We’re made so that we love

First when we see them painted, things we have passed

Perhaps a hundred times nor cared to see;

And so they are better, painted—better to us,

Which is the same thing. Art was given for that.

Fra Lippo Lippi [1855], l. 300,

Robert Browning (1812-1889)


Revealing communicating and heightening experience2

REVEALING, COMMUNICATING, AND HEIGHTENING EXPERIENCE

Only through art can we get outside of ourselves and know another’s view of the universe which is not the same as ours and see landscapes which would otherwise have remained unknown to us like the landscapes of the moon. Thanks to art, instead of seeing a single world, our own, we see it multiply until we have before us as many worlds as there are original artists . . . . And many centuries after their core, whether we call it Rembrandt or Vermeer, is extinguished, they continue to send us their special rays.

The Maxims of Marcel Proust [1948],

Marcel Proust (1871-1922)


Revealing communicating and heightening experience3

REVEALING, COMMUNICATING, AND HEIGHTENING EXPERIENCE

A novel is balanced between a few true impressions and the multitude of false ones that make up most of what we call life. It tells us that for every human being there is a diversity of existences, that the single existence is itself an illusion in part, that these many existences signify something, tend to something, fulfill something; it promises us meaning, harmony, and even justice . . . . Art attempts to find in the universe, in matter as well as in the facts of life, what is fundamental, enduring, essential.

Speech upon receiving the Nobel Prize [1976],

Saul Bellow (1915- )


Timeless eternal

TIMELESS, ETERNAL

Tout passe – L’art robuste

Seul a l’éternité;

Le buste

Survit à la cité.

L’Art [1832],

Théophile Gautier (1811-1872)


Timeless eternal1

TIMELESS, ETERNAL

Everything passes—Robust art

Alone is eternal.

The bust

Survives the city.

L’Art [1832],

Théophile Gautier (1811-1872)


Timeless eternal2

TIMELESS, ETERNAL

All passes. Art alone

Enduring stays to us;

The bust outlasts the throne—

The coin, Tiberius.

Ars Victrix [1876], st. 8,

Henry Austin Dobson (1840-1921)


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