Itn279 information literacy education
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ITN279 Information Literacy Education. Educational Event By Maranda Lloyd & Alexandra Cooney. Setting the Scene. Teaching new IT70 students how to evaluate websites We are a university mentor group, similar to PASS The IT70 students are all over 30 years of age. The IL Model.

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ITN279 Information Literacy Education

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Itn279 information literacy education

ITN279 Information Literacy Education

Educational Event

By

Maranda Lloyd & Alexandra Cooney


Setting the scene

Setting the Scene

  • Teaching new IT70 students how to evaluate websites

  • We are a university mentor group, similar to PASS

  • The IT70 students are all over 30 years of age


The il model

The IL Model

Australian and New Zealand Information Literacy (ANZIL) framework:

  • From the Australian and New Zealand Institute for Information Literacy (ANZIIL)

  • The framework is based on four key principles. The principles state that information literate people:

    1. engage in independent learning through constructing new meaning,

    understanding and knowledge

    2. derive satisfaction and personal fulfillment from using information wisely

    3. individually and collectively search for and use information for decision making and problem solving in order to address personal, professional and societal issues

    4. demonstrate social responsibility through a commitment to lifelong

    learning and community participation

    (Bundy, 2004, p.11).


The il model continued

The IL Model (continued)

The standards of the ANZIL framework –

  • The four principles frame six key standards which reflect information literacy acquisition, understanding and use by an individual. The standards state that an information literate person:

  • Recognises the need for information and determines the nature and extent of the information needed

  • Finds the required information effectively and efficiently

  • Critically evaluates information and the information seeking process

  • Manages the information collected or generated

  • Applies prior and new information to develop new concepts or

    create new understandings

  • Uses information with understanding and acknowledges the cultural,

    ethical, economic, legal, and social matters surrounding the use of

    information

    (Bundy, 2004, p.11).


The il model continued1

The IL Model (continued)

  • Our educational event primarily relates to the third standard in the ANZIL framework:

    The information literate person critically evaluates information and the information seeking process

  • More specifically, in relation to the third standard, the information literate person:

    - assesses the usefulness and relevance of the information found

    - defines and applies criteria for evaluating information

    - reflects on the information-seeking process and revises search strategies as

    required

    (Bundy, 2004, p.16).

  • In this case, IT70 students will be taught how to evaluate websites, using a set of evaluation criteria


The learning theory

The Learning Theory

Knowles’ Adult Learning theory:


Educational event feedback

Educational Event – Feedback

In relation to the lesson, we would like

feedback on the following:


The lesson begins

The Lesson Begins:

Teaching IT70 Students

How to Evaluate Websites


Aims and objectives

Aims and Objectives


Why evaluate websites

Why Evaluate Websites?


Evaluation criteria

Evaluation Criteria

Authority

  • Who is the author? What are their credentials?

  • What group is responsible for the website besides the author? What are their credentials?

  • Are author and/or publisher details readily available?

    Purpose

  • What is the intended purpose?


Evaluation criteria continued

Evaluation Criteria (continued)

Content

  • What subjects or topics are covered?

  • Where does the information come from?

  • Is the author’s point of view objective and impartial?

  • Does the information appear to be accurate and well researched?

  • How current and timely is the information?

  • When was the website created? When was it last updated?


Evaluation criteria continued1

Evaluation Criteria (continued)

Content (continued)

  • Is the focus popular, business-oriented, professional, or academic?

  • Is the content of the website an original idea or taken from other sources?

  • Are references attributed to the website? If yes, are they from trustworthy sources (eg. Academic journals, professional research)

  • How is the information organised?

  • Are the main points clearly presented?


Evaluation criteria continued2

Evaluation Criteria (continued)

Content (cotinued)

  • Is the author’s writing style easy to read?

  • Does the website have a Contact Us feature?

    Overall evaluation of website

  • Strengths

  • Weaknesses

    Adapted from: Katz, A. (1997). Introduction to Reference Work. New York: McGraw-Hill

    AND Birks, J., & Hunt, F. (2003). Hands-on Information Literacy Activities. New York:

    Neal-Schuman Publishers.


Class activity

Class Activity

Two groups:

  • One group will evaluate….

  • The other group will evaluate….


Key differences between the two websites

Key Differences Between the Two Websites


Importance of knowing how to evaluate websites

Importance of Knowing How to Evaluate Websites

End of lesson


Our view of the presentation strengths weaknesses

Our View of the Presentation (Strengths & Weaknesses)


Evaluation peer feedback

Evaluation – Peer Feedback

Please fill out the questionnaire provided

THANK YOU


References

References

Birks, J., & Hunt, F. (2003). Hands-on Information

Literacy Activities. New York: Neal-Schuman

Publishers.

Bundy, A. (Ed.). (2004). Australian and New Zealand Information

Literacy Framework: Principles, standards and practice (2nd ed.).

Adelaide: Australian and New Zealand Institute for Information

Literacy. Retrieved May 10, 2007, from

http://www.anziil.org/resources/Info%20lit%202nd%20edition.pdf .

Katz, A. (1997). Introduction to Reference Work.

New York: McGraw-Hill.


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