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GCO Pillar II: 1. UNEP Chemicals and Finance Initiative activities 2. Case studies. Louise Gallagher Consultant (Economics) Chemicals Branch, DTIE, UNEP. Overview Supporting the fulfilment of work for Pillar II – Economic Implications of Chemicals Production, Use and Disposal (RR).

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gco pillar ii 1 unep chemicals and finance initiative activities 2 case studies

GCO Pillar II: 1. UNEP Chemicals and Finance Initiative activities 2. Case studies

Louise Gallagher

Consultant (Economics)

Chemicals Branch,

DTIE, UNEP

slide2
Overview Supporting the fulfilment of work for Pillar II – Economic Implications of Chemicals Production, Use and Disposal (RR)

Draft Outline Pillar II:

  • Overview of Economic Implications of Trends
  • Financial Implications
  • External Cost Implications
  • Case Studies
slide3
III. Financial Implications UNEP Finance Initiative–Chemicals Collaboration to strengthen messages and services for both our ‘clients’
  • Who are UNEP FI?
  • Drivers for collaboration:
    • Finance sector is a key leverage point
    • Chemicals financing discussions
    • Need for deeper understanding of ‘private sector’
    • Delivering to UNEP FI membership
  • Objectives
    • ‘Mutual learning’
    • Identify high impact areas of collaboration
iii financial implications timeline and outcomes to date for the chemicals finance collaboration
III. Financial Implications Timeline and outcomes to date for the Chemicals-Finance collaboration
  • Mar 2011
  • Andrew Dlugolecki
  • Financial pieceoutline
  • FI SteeringCommitee
  • Jan 2011
  • First contact
  • Focal points established

Dec 2010

- UNEP FI requests informal meeting

  • Feb 2011
  • Information exchange
  • Guest speaker
  • April 2011
  • Membership mailing
  • June 2011
  • New focal points
  • Working group proposed
  • May 2011
  • GCO finance workbegins
iii financial implications elements of continued collaboration supporting the gco
III. Financial Implications Elements of continued collaboration supporting the GCO
  • Extending contact with insurance, banking and investment sectors
    • Establish a ‘Working Group on Chemicals’
      • Reach out to members of existing groups to populate
      • Meeting suggested for September (no concrete action on this yet)
  • Review from the finance sector
  • When the timing is right…
    • New! Principles for Sustainable Insurance
    • UNEP FI Global Roundtable, Oct 2011
    • The Geneva Association
slide6
III. Financial Implications ESG (Environment Social Governance) Risks framework for ‘Chemicals’ is going to be an important output
  • ESG Risks is the only ‘language’ on sustainable development in the finance sector context that has embedded itself
  • Broader vision of potential ‘chemicals-risks’ impacts on the finance sector
    • COI
    • Value for UNEP FI and its members
    • A guide to future work on chemicals and the finance sector
slide7
IV. External Cost Implications The ‘costs of inaction’ results will be central for completing this section
  • Framing of cost implications
  • Categorization of costs
  • ‘Sizing’ the problem
  • Literature, figures, case studies
  • Authoritive gaps analysis
  • Reflecting the COI strategy
slide8

V. Case Studies The main purpose of the case studies is to draw together the financial and external cost information in a concrete discussion

  • GCO: Demonstrating possibilities for ‘economic framing’ of chemicals-related trends and use of this information in decision-making
    • What choices would we hope to inform?
      • Development paths
      • Investment in sound management of chemicals
    • Aiming for ‘Net Benefits’ type of discussion…
  • COI on gaps/case studies under Module B
  • New (and needed) stand-alone contributions for the individual topics
slide9

V. Case Studies Four topics are PROPOSED as case studies to complement the work of Pillar I , provide information for Pillars II and III

  • Mercury use in artisanal and small-scale gold mining
  • E-Waste
  • Industrial chemicals (accidents)
  • Pesticides (IPM/IVM)
slide10

Case Study 1Mercury use in artisanal and small-scale gold mining – reasons for including a case study on this topic in the GCO (1)

  • Forthcoming Mercury Treaty
  • Elimination, reduction (and management) of mercury in gold mining falls in the scope of SMC and has a global dimension
  • Captures three issues of particular interest to the COI/GCO:
    • i) mining and chemicals, ii) metals and iii) drivers of economic development with a chemicals dimension
slide11
Case Study 1Mercury use in artisanal and small-scale gold mining – reasons for including a case study on this topic in the GCO (2)
  • Captures some interesting aspects: i) non-chemicals production trends that impact on chemicals usage (intensity) ii) illegal use
  • Significant exposure numbers and vulnerabilities – occupational, local and indirect
  • Informs some key policy choices:
    • Initial choice of ‘development paths’
    • Minimizing costs (maximizing benefits) from existing development choices
case study 2 e waste reasons for including a case study on this topic in the gco 1
Case Study 2 e-waste – reasons for including a case study on this topic in the GCO (1)
  • E-waste ‘falls squarely’ in the scope of SMC/global chemicals trends
  • Captures two issues of particular interest to the COI/GCO:
    • i) sustainable production/green chemistry and ii) management of chemicals in products in end-of-life phases
  • Significant exposure numbers and vulnerabilities – occupational, local and indirect
case study 2 e waste reasons for including a case study on this topic in the gco 2
Case Study 2 e-waste – reasons for including a case study on this topic in the GCO (2)
  • Emerging discussion that would benefit from inclusion in COI/GCO
  • Informs some key policy choices:
    • How strictly to regulateelectrical and electronicequipment production
    • Domesticrequirements for e-waste management
    • How strictly to regulate e-wasteexports/ imports
slide14
Case Study 3 Industrial chemicals (production-accidents)– reasons for including a case study on this topic in the GCO
  • Increasingrisk of industrial accidents with shift of production ‘fallssquarely’ in the scope of SMC/global chemicals trends
  • Cross-cutting – links trends, finance (insurance), economic implications and policy
  • Exposure and vulnerabilities – occupational, local and indirect (depending on emissions)
  • Informs some key policy choices:
    • ‘Developmentpaths’
    • Regulatingindustrial H&S, pollution control ..
case study 4 pesticides ivm ipm reasons for including a case study on this topic in the gco
Case Study 4 Pesticides (IVM/IPM) – reasons for including a case study on this topic in the GCO
  • Pesticides (IVM/IPM) ‘falls squarely’ in the scope of SMC/Global chemicals trends
  • Highlighted in Pillar I trends: Production, use and disposal (obsolete pesticides)
  • Significant exposure numbers and vulnerabilities – occupational, local and indirect
  • Informs some key policy choices:
    • ‘Development paths’
    • Regulating production, trade, use and disposal
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