Key principles for providing speech language services to english language learners
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Key Principles for Providing Speech-Language Services to English Language Learners. Presentation by Sarah Abbott TE 845/ Fritzen November 14, 2010. Key Principles for Providing Speech-Language Services to English Language Learners.

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Key Principles for Providing Speech-Language Services to English Language Learners

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Key principles for providing speech language services to english language learners

Key Principles for Providing Speech-Language Services to English Language Learners

Presentation by Sarah Abbott

TE 845/ Fritzen

November 14, 2010


Key principles for providing speech language services to english language learners1

Key Principles for Providing Speech-Language Services to English Language Learners

The roles and responsibilities of school-based speech language pathologists are numerous, especially for clinicians who have English language learners (ELLs) on their caseloads.

This presentation outlines the Knowledge and Skills for Cultural and Linguistics Services (ASHA, 2004) and provides critical information for SLPs working with ELLs.


American speech language association

American Speech Language Association

The American Speech-Language and Hearing Association (ASHA) requires specific knowledge and skills of clinicians providing cultural and linguistic services clearly outlined in the Knowledge and Skills Needed by Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists to Provide Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services [Knowledge and Skills].


Fun facts

Fun Facts

  • American Speech Language and Hearing Association (ASHA) conducted a survey in the spring of 2010 that was designed to provide information about school-based service delivery.

  • Results revealed:

    • ~50% of full-time school-based SLPs provided services in English

    • ~40% of school-based SLPs had no ELLs on caseload


Key principles for providing speech language services to english language learners

American Speech-Language-Hearing Associations (2010) SLP Caseload Characteristics, 2010 Schools Survey


Knowledge and skills

Knowledge and Skills

  • “3.2 Clinician without native or near-native proficiency in the language(s)/ dialect(s) spoken or signed by the client/patient will…”

  • Obtain information on the features and developmental characteristics of the language(s)/dialect(s) spoken or signed by the client/patient

  • 2. Obtaining information on the sociolinguistic features of the client's/patient's significant cultural and linguistic influences.

    2. Work collaboratively with translators/interpreters

    Ensure that translators/interpreters will provide accurate translation


Distinguish the disorder

Distinguish the Disorder

“4.0 Role: Obtain knowledge base needed to distinguish typical and disordered language of clients/patients.”

At the 2009 ASHA Convention, Karen Harris presented her research on the current assessment practices for English Language Learners. During this presentation she reminded colleagues that it is an SLP’s responsibility to distinguish a disability from cultural differences (Harris, 2009)

SLPs must also be able to determine students’ typical speech and langauge development in their community and communication environment. They must also understand how sociolinguistic and cultural components impact second language learning.


Signs of a disorder or delay

Signs of a Disorder or Delay

  • Communication difficulties at home & with peers

  • Inappropriate use of pragmatic (social) language

  • Reliance on gestures to communicate

  • Developing slower than siblings

  • Imprecise vocabulary and grammar; poor sequencing skills

  • Difficulty paying attention; asks for repetitions

  • Overall communication skills are substantially poorer than those of peers


Characteristics of speech language disorders

Characteristics of Speech-Language Disorders

  • Nonverbal aspects of language are culturally inappropriate

  • Does not express basic needs appropriately

  • Rarely initiates verbal interaction with peers

  • Responds inappropriately when peers initiate interactions

  • Gives inappropriate responses

  • Peers give indications that they have difficultycommunicating with the student

  • Replaces speech with gestures

  • Show poor topic maintenance

  • Perseverates on a topic

  • Needs to have information repeated often, even with the information has been modified


Difficulties related to working with translators interpreters

Difficulties related to working with Translators/Interpreters

School administrators are legally responsible for providing a translator for family members when necessary.

In 2005, Michale immigrated with her family to the United States from Turkey. She was placed a gen ed, whole-English classroom and ESL support was provided. In 2006 she was tested and diagnosed with a speech and language impairment after which she began receiving services from the school’s SLP. Turkish and Russian are spoken in Michale’s home and her parents do not speak English. During conferences and IEP meetings, Mikale’s older brother serves as the translator at her parents request.

Why might this be a concern?


Assessment

Assessment

  • The ASHA special interest group on school-base issues…

    • Determined that assessments of ELLs should include much more than standardized assessments, as these are not always valid or reliable.

      • Research by Restrepo and Silverman in 2001 suggests that the Preschool Language Scale-3– Spanish Edition (PLS-3) lacked reliability and construct or content validity for testing Spanish/English speakers. Due to the wide range of language proficiency among Spanish speakers, they suggest that assessments provide separate normative data for monolingual and bilingual Spanish speakers (Restrepo & Silverman, 2001).

    • Determined that to obtain a comprehensive portrait of the students' full complement of knowledge and skills, SLPs should consult multiple sources for information regarding the student’s language proficiency and academic achievement in English and his or her native language.


Assessment continued

Assessment continued

“5.0 Role: Identification/Assessment of typical and disordered language. This includes knowledge and skills related to: Assessment materials/tests/tools

Appropriate use of published test materials in language assessment including standardized norm-referenced tests and criterion- referenced tests, including analyzing normative sampling limitations, general psychometric issues especially related to validity and reliability, and inherent cultural and linguistic biases in these test materials.

Application of appropriate criteria so that assessment materials/ tests/tools that fail to meet standards be used as informal probes, with no accompanying scores.

Inherent problems in using translated tests so that translated tests are used only as informal probes, with no accompanying scores

Appropriate use of alternative approaches to assessment including dynamic assessment, portfolio assessment, structured observation, narrative assessment, academic and social language sampling, interview assessment tools, and curriculum-based procedures, including analysis of validity, reliability, and inherent cultural and linguistic biases.

How cultural and linguistic biases in assessment tools impact on an appropriate differential diagnosis between a language disorder and a language difference.


Evaluation check list

Evaluation Check List

The following tasks that need to be completed in order to begin providing speech-language services:

  • Observe and fill out findings on form

  • Complete a screening

  • Send home permission to test

  • Evaluate Child

  • Give teacher an input form

  • Fill out MET

  • Write speech & language report

  • Speech referral for Medicaid


Cultivating cultural competence

Cultivating Cultural Competence

“1.0 Role: Sensitivity to cultural and linguistic differences that affect the identification, assessment, treatment and management of communication disorders/differences in persons.”

“In the clinical setting, SLPs and audiologists are challenged to accurately diagnose clients’ problems, establish appropriate treatment, and motivate them to comply with the recommended course of treatment. Yet, our clients’ cultural beliefs will affect how they describe their health problems, the manner in which they present their symptoms, who they seek for health care, how long they remain in care, and how they evaluate the care provided,” (Tomoeda & Bayles, 2002).


References

References

  • American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2004). Knowledge and Skills Needed by Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists to Provide Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services [Knowledge and Skills]. Available from www.asha.org/policy

  • American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (2010) SLP Caseload Characteristics, 2010 Schools Survey

  • American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (2003).Technical report:American English Dialects. ASHA Supplement, 23, pp. 45-46.

  • Gottlieb, M., Sanchez-Lopez, C. (2008) Assessing English Language Learners: A Perplexing Puzzle. Perspectives on School-Based Issues.9(June), 45-51


References continued

References continued

  • Harris, K. P. (2009) School-based speech-language pathologists’ assessment practices with English language learners. ASHA convention, New Orleans, LA.

  • Restrepo, M.A., Silverman S.W. (2001) Validity of the Spanish Preschool Language Scale-3 for use with bilingual children. American Journal of

  • Speech Language Pathology, 10(Nov), 382-393

  • Seitel Ph.D, A., Garcia, M.P. (2009) Language difference, delay and disorder in Spanish-English bilingual students. ASHA convention, New Orleans, LA., November 20, 2009.

  • Tomoeda, C. K. & Bayles, K. A. (2002, April 02). Cultivating Cultural Competence in the Workplace, Classroom, and Clinic. The ASHA Leader.


Resources for slps

Resources for SLPs

  • American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2010). Roles and responsibilities of speech-language pathologists in schools [Position statement]. Available from www.asha.org/policy.

  • Goldstein, B. (2000). Cultural and linguistic diversity resource guide for speech-language pathologists . San Diego, CA: Singular Publishing Group, Inc.

  • Seitel Ph.D, A., Garcia, M.P. (2009) Language difference, delay and disorder in Spanish-English bilingual students. ASHA Convention. New Orleans, LA., November 20, 2009.


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