Why Employee Wellness?
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Why Employee Wellness?. Health Costs Challenge Business & Government. Source: CMS. > Spending Leads To > Premiums. Mid-1990s: premiums fell sharply 2001 – 2004: premiums grew at double digit rates. Source: KFF/HRET; Bureau of Labor Statistics; U.S. Consumer Price Index.

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Why Employee Wellness?

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Why Employee Wellness?


Health Costs Challenge Business & Government

Source: CMS


> Spending Leads To > Premiums

  • Mid-1990s: premiums fell sharply

  • 2001 – 2004: premiums grew at double digit rates

Source: KFF/HRET; Bureau of Labor Statistics; U.S. Consumer Price Index


Health Benefit Costs, Per Active Employee

Source, Mercer HR Consulting, “Health Benefit Costs Slow for A Third Year ...”, Nov. 20, 2005


Why Are Healthcare Premiums Increasing?

Source: PricewaterhouseCoopers

The Factors Fueling Rising Healthcare Costs 2006


Reasons Why Utilization Is Increasing


Increasing Prevalence of Chronic Disease

Projected Number of People with Chronic Conditions (in millions)

Source: Wu, Shin-Yi, and Green, Anthony, “Projection of Chronic Illness Prevalence and Cost Inflation,”

RAND Corp., October 2000


The Obesity Burden

  • 64%: Increase in diabetes patients, 1987-2002

  • 1,000%: Increase in obesity-related costs, 1987-2002

  • $1,244: Annual health care spending difference, normal weight v. obese adults.

    Source: Health Affairs, June 2005

% of U.S. Health Spending

On Obesity-linked Conditions


“Un-Wellness” Costs (in Billions)

Source: Health Promotion Advocates, from CDC, NIH, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, and Journal of Occupational Medicine.


$5,520

$3,460

$3,039

$2,199

Edington, AJHP. 15(5):341-349, 2001

Excess Medical Costs Due to Excess Risks


Excess On-The-Job Loss Due to Excess Risks

14.7%

Burton, Chen, Conti, Schultz, Pransky, Edington. JOEM. 47(8):769-777. 2005


HRA Participants

Non-Participants

(N=4,649)

Low Risk

0-2 Risks

(N=685)

Medium Risk

3-4 Risks

(N=520)

High Risk

5+ Risks

(N=366)

WC Claims

STD Claims

Absence Record

Disability Claim

25.4%

23.4%

49.9%

61.3%

30.2%

30.8%

63.1%

72.5%

30.2%

29.6%

41.0%

64.4%

38.0%

46.7%

69.7%

81.7%

Percentage of Employees with a

Disability Claim by Risk Status

Wright, Beard, Edington. JOEM. 44(12):1126-1134, 2002


What Can Schools Do?

Create awareness of need

Create a sense of urgency

Empower with resources

Build and support a culture of wellness

  • Policies

  • Environment

  • Include everyone


What Can Schools Do?


Devastating Consequences of Doing Nothing

  • Today’s generation of American children may be the first in modern history to live shorter lives than their parents

U.S. Surgeon General Richard Carmona

March 2, 2004


No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1985

(*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person)


No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1986


No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1987


No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1988


No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1989


No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1990


No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1991


No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1992


No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1993


No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1994


No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1995


No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1996


No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1997


No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1998


No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1999


No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2000


Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2001

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%


Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2002

(*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%


Obesity* Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2003

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%


Diabetes Trends* Among Adults in the U.S.(Includes Gestational Diabetes)BRFSS 1990

Source: Mokdad et al., Diabetes Care 2000;23:1278-83.


Diabetes Trends* Among Adults in the U.S.BRFSS 1991-92

Source: Mokdad et al., Diabetes Care 2000;23:1278-83.


Diabetes Trends* Among Adults in the U.S.BRFSS 1993-94

Source: Mokdad et al., Diabetes Care 2000;23:1278-83.


Diabetes Trends* Among Adults in the U.S.BRFSS 1995-96

Source: Mokdad et al., Diabetes Care 2000;23:1278-83.


Diabetes Trends* Among Adults in the U.S.BRFSS 1995

Source: Mokdad et al., Diabetes Care 2000;23:1278-83.


Diabetes Trends* Among Adults in the U.S.BRFSS 1997-98

Source: Mokdad et al., Diabetes Care 2000;23:1278-83.


Diabetes Trends* Among Adults in the U.S.BRFSS 1999

Source: Mokdad et al., Diabetes Care 2001;24:412.


Diabetes Trends* Among Adults in the U.S.BRFSS 2000

Source: Mokdad et al., J Am Med Assoc 2001;286:10.


Diabetes Trends* Among Adults in the U.S.BRFSS 2001

Source: Mokdad et al., J Am Med Assoc 2001;286:10.


3 Keys to Success

  • Keep It Simple: Focus on a few key issues; aim for high participation rates

  • Communicate Effectively: Build infrastructure for future success

  • Reward Healthy Behaviors: Celebrate success


Where to Begin

  • Know your needs

  • Set realistic goals and objectives

  • Evaluate your resources

  • Involve the “right” people

  • Develop a long-term strategy

  • It’s all in the execution – DO SOMETHING


Know Your Population’s Needs

Physical activity

Healthy eating

Weight management


Set Realistic Goals and Objectives

  • GOALS

  • Faculty and staff will be more active

  • Faculty and staff will improve eating habits

  • OBJECTIVES

  • At least 40% of faculty and staff will complete 8-week physical activity challenge

  • Healthy food items will be labeled in cafeteria and vending machines


Evaluate Your Resources

  • In Your School

  • Ways to communicate

  • Health teachers, physical education teachers, food service professionals, school nurses, others

  • Resources provided by Bower Foundation

  • In Your Community

  • Non-profit health agencies

  • Local hospitals

  • Home extension service


Involve the “Right” People

  • People who want to be involved

  • Those with access to resources

  • Decision makers

  • Representative Committee

    • Meet monthly

    • Identify opportunities

    • Coordinate baby steps

    • Build infrastructure


Develop a 3-Year Strategy

  • YEAR 1

  • Start with small simple steps

  • Focus on participation, and measure it

  • Focus on FUN

  • YEAR 2

  • Build on success

  • Focus on outcomes, and measure them

  • YEAR 3

  • Continue to build on success

  • Tell your school’s story to others


DO SOMETHING

Even little things make a difference when done consistently over time.

Don’t let what you can do keep you from doing what you can do.

Success breeds success.


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