Comparative Qualitative Research Methods Oxford University, Hilary Term 2006  Wk 8: Within-Case Analysis

Comparative Qualitative Research Methods Oxford University, Hilary Term 2006 Wk 8: Within-Case Analysis PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 160 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Types of Case Studies (Eckstein 1975). Configurative-idiographic: Gerring would not define this as a caseDisciplined-configurative: case as test of existing theoryHeuristic: case provides building blocks of theoryPlausibility probe: may establish scope of theoryCrucial case: test of theory. Most likely" and least likely" research designs.

Download Presentation

Comparative Qualitative Research Methods Oxford University, Hilary Term 2006 Wk 8: Within-Case Analysis

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


1. Comparative Qualitative Research Methods Oxford University, Hilary Term 2006 Wk 8: Within-Case Analysis Adrienne LeBas Nuffield College, Oxford Email: [email protected] Phone: 01865 278518

2. Types of Case Studies (Eckstein 1975) Configurative-idiographic: Gerring would not define this as a case Disciplined-configurative: case as test of existing theory Heuristic: case provides building blocks of theory Plausibility probe: may establish scope of theory Crucial case: test of theory

3. “Most likely” and “least likely” research designs Crucial case studies: case study as experiment (Eckstein 1975: 116) Criticism #1: How does one identify crucial cases? Prior comparison necessary. “Folk Bayesian” approach: crucial cases don’t operate in a vacuum Criticism #1: only have value if they are “deviant cases;” can only disconfirm or modify established generalizations from elsewhere Causal mechanisms approach; reliability of observations may be high

4. Intra-Case Complexity Intensive study of single cases can deal with complex processes that are often ignored in quantitative research “Hidden” processes: Scott and “weapons of the weak”; contextual interpretation Time: critical junctures; path dependence Concatenations of mechanisms

5. Causal Mechanisms Micro-foundations of larger theories (Stinchcombe 1991) “a delimited class of events that alter relations among specified sets of elements in identical or closely similar ways over a variety of situations” (McAdam, Tarrow & Tilly 2001) Different from covering law: explanation requires “cogs” connecting variables (Elster 1989, etc; Hedstrom and Swedberg 1998) Indeterminacy of outcome Mechanism versus process

6. Methodological Individualism & Causal Mechanisms Many scholars see individual-level mechanisms as the only sound form of mechanism (Elster, Hedstrom et al) Methodological individualism: social phenomena result from individual actions, themselves a result of actor’s “preferences” Macro-micro-macro model of link between structure and agency

7. Coleman’s “Boat” Macro level:

8. An Example: Threshold Models of Collective Action / Coordination Individual decision to participate shaped by assessment of likely participation of others (Granovetter 1978) Used to explain mass protest (Lichbach 1998, etc, etc), language choice (Laitin 1998), state collapse (Solnick 1998) How do individuals assess? Type matching (Lohmann 1994); “announcements” (Bhavnani & Ross 2003)

9. Non-Cognitive Mechanisms McAdam, Tarrow and Tilly (DOC; 2001) suggest that this is too narrow a view of mechanisms. Instead, environmental and relational mechanisms are viable bases for explanation. Environmental: broader social changes or processes. e.g., birth booms and rebellion (Goldstone) Relational: brokerage; boundary construction. e.g., social networks and mobilization (Gould)

10. Within-Case Analysis: Conceptual Issues Different ways of structuring case “stories”: Analytic Narratives (Bates et al) versus process-tracing (Bennett & George) But shared assumption of selective use of case materials: “structured, focused comparison” Explicit and sustained attention to fit between theory and case narrative

11. Within-Case Analysis: Nuts and Bolts In order to maximize leverage of case analysis, one must: Transform descriptive into analytical explanations … not Przeworski & Teune Disaggregate processes into mechanisms Have a working theory of time Have a working theory of contingency

  • Login