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Emotions are processes that are shaped by physiology, perceptions, and social experiences. Emotional Intelligence. The ability to recognize which feelings are appropriate in which situations and the skill to communicate those feelings effectively. Emotional Intelligence.

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Emotions are processes that are shaped by physiology, perceptions, and social experiences.

emotional intelligence
Emotional Intelligence

The ability to recognize which feelings are appropriate in which situations and the skill to communicate those feelings effectively.

emotional intelligence1
Emotional Intelligence
  • Being in touch with your feelings
  • Managing your emotions without being overcome by them
  • Not letting setbacks and disappointments derail you
  • Channeling your feelings to assist you in achieving your goals
  • Having a strong sense of empathy
  • Listening to your and others’ feelings
  • Having a strong yet realistic sense of optimism
the organismic view of emotions
The Organismic View of Emotions

Stimulus

Physiological

Response

Emotion

  • Regard emotions as a result of physiological factors that are instinctual and beyond our conscious analysis or control.
  • Recent research demonstrates that physiological reactions are neither as instinctual nor as subject to conscious control as once assumed.
the perceptual view of emotions
The Perceptual View of Emotions

External

Event

Perception

of Event

Interpreted

Emotion

Physiological

Response

  • Asserts that subjective perceptions shape what external phenomena mean to us.
  • External objects and events gain meaning only as we attribute significance to them.
the cognitive labeling view of emotions
The Cognitive LabelingView of Emotions

External

Event

Physiological

Response

Label for

Response

Emotion

  • Emphasizes the role of language in shaping our interpretation of events and our emotions in response to them.
  • What we feel may be shaped by the labels we attach to physiological responses.
the interactive view of emotions
The InteractiveView of Emotions
  • Key concepts
    • Framing rules are guidelines for defining the emotional meaning of situations.
    • Emotion work defines the effort we invest to generate what we think are appropriate feelings in particular situations.
the interactive view of emotions1
The InteractiveView of Emotions
  • Key concepts
    • Feeling rules tell us what we have a right to feel or what we are expected to feel in particular situations.
      • Deep acting is controlling emotions by management of inner feelings.
      • Surface acting involves controlling the outward expression of emotions, not controlling what is felt.
the interactive view of emotions2
The InteractiveView of Emotions

Framing

Rules

Feeling

Rules

Felt

Emotion

Emotion

Work

Felt

Emotion

Emotional

Expression

  • Assumes that what we feel
    • Involves thinking, perceiving, and imagining
  • While being influenced by
    • Social rules for framing situations
    • Specifying what we should and can feel
the impact of different views of emotions
If you think that feelings are instinctual

If you accept the interactive view of emotions

The Impact of Different Views of Emotions
  • You will probably assume that feelings cannot be analyzed or controlled.
  • You are more likely to analyze your emotions and perhaps change them.
obstacles to effective communication of emotions
Obstacles to Effective Communication of Emotions
  • We don’t always express our emotions.
  • Social factors shape feelings and expression of them.
    • Men and women need to review the feeling rules they have been taught.
    • We need to decide which rules we think are appropriate and desirable to follow.
    • Reviewing social feeling rules helps us identify ones that are dysfunctional and choose not to adhere to them.
obstacles to effective communication of emotions1
Obstacles to Effective Communication of Emotions
  • Vulnerability—we may not express our feelings because we don’t want to expose ourselves to others.
  • Protecting others—we may not want to hurt or upset others.
  • Our social and professional roles may make expressing some feelings inappropriate.
ineffective expression of emotions
Ineffective Expression of Emotions
  • Speaking in generalities recognizes only a few of the many emotions that can be experienced.
  • Not owning feelings involves stating feelings in a way that disowns personal responsibility for the feeling.
  • Counterfeit emotional language seems to express emotions but does not actually describe what a person is feeling.
the rational emotive approach to feelings
The Rational-Emotive Approach to Feelings

Step 1

Monitor emotional reaction.

Step 2

Identify commonalities in events and

experiences that you respond to emotionally.

Step 3

Tune into your self-talk; notice irrational

beliefs and fallacies.

Step 4

Use self-talk to dispute fallacies.

common fallacies about emotions
Common Fallacies About Emotions

Perfectionism

Unrealistically low self concept

Stress

Chronic dissatisfaction with self

Jealousy and envy of others

Obsession with

shoulds

Saps energy for constructive work

Can make others defensive

Can alienate self from feelings

Unrealistic standards set the self up

for failure

Over-

generalization

Perceive one failure as typical of self

Generalize inadequacies in some

domains to total self

common fallacies about emotions1
Common Fallacies About Emotions

Taking

responsibility

for others

Thinking you are responsible for

others’ feelings

Guilt for how others feel

Deprives others of taking

responsibility for selves

Helplessness

Believing that there is nothing you

can do to change how you feel

Resignation; depression

Fear of

catastrophic

failure

Extreme negative fantasies and

scenarios of what could happen

Inability to do things because of

what might happen

guidelines for communicating emotions effectively
Guidelines for Communicating Emotions Effectively
  • Identify your emotions.
  • Choose how to communicate your emotions.
  • Own your feelings.
  • Monitor your self-talk.
  • Respond sensitively when others communicate emotions.
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