Objective model
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Objective Model. Reported as facts without distortion by personal feelings, prejudices, interpretations Neutrality (factual v. interpretive claims) Balance Reliability. Is Objectivity Possible? Major Lessons of Chapter 1. Major news media are owned/controlled by major corporations.

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Objective Model

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Objective model

Objective Model

  • Reported as facts without distortion by personal feelings, prejudices, interpretations

  • Neutrality (factual v. interpretive claims)

  • Balance

  • Reliability


Is objectivity possible major lessons of chapter 1

Is Objectivity Possible?Major Lessons of Chapter 1

  • Major news media are owned/controlled by major corporations.

  • Mainstream media outlets have been consolidated into fewer and fewer hands, each of which is part of the corporate system.

  • Inner-ring or upper tier media outlets have grown larger and more influential through horizontal and vertical integration.

  • Agenda setting media serve in numerous ways with other corporations including interlocking directorates.

  • Media are mainly concerned with profit/advertising dollars.

  • Media rely heavily on information provided by government sources.

  • The powerful have greater ability to produce “flak” in order to influence media coverage.

  • Perspectives that threaten the status quo are least likely to appear in the media.


Social construction

Social Construction

  • Social problems are “constructed” (i.e., created), often through the media

  • Reporting of real problem

  • Blown out of proportion

  • Typification (frames/narratives)

  • Linkage

  • Policy created


Objective model

http://www.pscj.appstate.edu/media/moralpanics.html


Newsweek s coke plague story march 17 1986

Newsweek’s “Coke Plague” Story(March 17, 1986)

Shocking Numbers and Graphic Accounts: Quantified Images of Drug Problems in

the Print Media

James D. Orcutt &

J. Blake Turner

Social Problems, Vol. 40, No. 2. (May, 1993), pp. 190-206.


Objective model

Panel A – actual data (depicts “lifetime” use not “current” use)

Newsweek’s “Coke Plague” Story(March 17, 1986)


Objective model

Panel B – editorial deletions

Cut out large increases in late 1970s

Cut out foundation or “context” of data

Newsweek’s “Coke Plague” Story(March 17, 1986)


Objective model

Panel C – tinkering with figure

Made a “finer” Y scale (makes increase look larger)

Newsweek’s “Coke Plague” Story(March 17, 1986)


Objective model

Panel D – more tinkering with figure

Added depth (3-D) to make look larger

Called it a “plague”

Newsweek’s “Coke Plague” Story(March 17, 1986)


Actual cocaine use mtf 12 th graders

ACTUAL Cocaine Use(MTF, 12th graders)

% Current Users


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