Warm up
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 10

Warm-Up PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 78 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Warm-Up. On a Piece of Notebook Paper, Box off 8 lines. Answer the following questions making sure to follow the STAAR Short Answer Response Format. (Answer Question, Quote, Analysis).

Download Presentation

Warm-Up

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Warm up

Warm-Up

On a Piece of Notebook Paper, Box off 8 lines. Answer the following questions making sure to follow the STAAR Short Answer Response Format. (Answer Question, Quote, Analysis)

Discuss how Rainsford’s character changes in Richard Connell’s short story “The Most Dangerous Game.” Explain your answer and support it with evidence from the text.

Get out your Literary Analysis Questions from MDG and be ready to turn it in.


Short answer rubric review

Short Answer Rubric Review

  • The language is key!

    0 = The idea is not an answer to the question, is incorrect, or is too vague

     1 = No text evidence (a.k.a. No Quote)

    The idea is only a literal interpretation of the story

    2 = The idea is reasonable and goes beyond a literal interpretation

    The text evidence is accurate and relevant

    The idea and the text evidence are clearly linked

     3 = The idea is perceptive and shows the complexities of the text

    The text evidence is specific and well chosen.

    The answer shows a deep understanding of the text.


So how did you do

So, how did you do?

  • After looking at the rubric, give your short answer response to a neighbor.

  • I also need 5 volunteers to write their responses on the board. 


What would constitute a literal interpretation

What would constitute a literal interpretation?

  • Example:

    In Richard Connell’s short story “The Most Dangerous Game,” Rainsford’s character changes because he transforms from being a hunter to the hunted. Rainsford is hiding in the woods from Zaroff when he suddenly “knew his pursuer was coming; he heard the padding sound of feet on the soft earth.” At the beginning of the story, Rainsford was described as a master hunter, but now he has to cower in the woods like prey hoping not to be caught.

Literal Interpretation = Plot Summary


The lottery short answer

“The Lottery” Short Answer

Use the rubric and your “MDG” response as a model to answer the following short answer question.

How does Shirley Jackson use foreshadowing in “The Lottery”? Explain your answer and support it with evidence from the text.

**Always make sure to deconstruct the prompt. This will help prevent those “literal interpretation” answers.

What is key about the two boxed words?

Is it asking you to list examples of foreshadowing?


The crossover or connecting selections

The Crossover or “Connecting Selections”

  • You must address bothselections.

  • You must have textual evidence from both selections

  • These will typically be questions asking you to connect similar themes.

  • You can follow one of the following outlines:

    1. Answer the Question (“mini thesis”)

    2. Text Evidence from Selection #1

    3. Transition + Text Evidence from Selection #2

    4. Analysis of both selections

  • Answer the Question

  • Text Evidence from Selection #1

  • Analysis of Selection #1

  • Transition + Text Evidence from Selection #2

  • Analysis of Selection #2


Example

Example

Discuss how foreshadowing is used in Richard Connell’s “The Most Dangerous Game” and Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery.”

In “The Most Dangerous Game” and in “The Lottery,” Connell and Jackson use the device of foreshadowing to create suspense. Connell foreshadows the evil of General Zaroff’s game when Zaroff explains that to find the ideal prey he “had to invent a new animal.” With this revelation the reader becomes more intrigued as to what exactly this new animal is. It is only shortly after that the suspense is replaced with shock that the new animal is a human. In “The Lottery” Jackson allows the suspense to linger as the reader learns of the children gathering rocks in the town square, the preparation of the black box, and the crowd that was “quiet, wetting their lips, not looking around.” The foreshadowing in the quiet nature of the crowd builds suspense by causing the audience to question why the townspeople would be so anxious. It is not until the end of the story that all of Jackson’s foreshadowing comes together to reveal the lottery results in death.


Practice

Practice

Use the rubric and the outline model to answer the following connecting selections questions. Make sure to deconstruct the prompt to help you understand what you are writing about.

What do Richard Connell and Shirley Jackson reveal about mankind in their short stories “The Most Dangerous Game” and “The Lottery”? Explain your answer and support it with evidence from the text.


Scoring your responses

Scoring Your Responses

  • Trade your responses from “The Lottery” single selection and the crossover.

  • Read your neighbor’s responses and score them using the rubric.

  • Remember to use the appropriate section of the rubric as you score.


  • Login