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Leonie Haimson , Class Size Matters July 2014 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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UnMet need for seats in Proposed 2015-2019 capital plan Including class size and overcrowding data for community school district 16. Leonie Haimson , Class Size Matters July 2014. School Utilization Rates at critical levels.

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Leonie Haimson , Class Size Matters July 2014

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UnMet need for seats in Proposed 2015-2019 capital planIncluding class size and overcrowding data for community school district 16

Leonie Haimson, Class Size Matters

July 2014


School Utilization Rates at critical levels

  • Citywide, schools have become more overcrowded over last six years. More than 480,000 students citywide are in extremely overcrowded buildings.

  • Elementary schools avg. building utilization “target” rates at 97.4%; median at 102%. High schools are not far behind at 95.2%.

  • High ES rates in all boroughs, including D10 and D11 in the Bronx 108% and 105.6%, respectively.

  • In Queens, D24 (120.6%), D25 (109.7%), D26 (110%), D27 (106.1%), and D30 (107.3%) all extremely overcrowded.

  • At the MS level, D20 in Brooklyn, D24, and D25 in Queens have building utilization rates over 95%.

  • Queens high school buildings have avg. utilization rate of 110.7% and Staten Island high school buildings 103.2%.

    Data source: Blue Book target utilization rates 2012-2013


Average Utilization Rates City-Wide 2012-2013

Source: 2012-2013 DOE Blue Book


Proposed capital plan vs. needs for seats

  • Proposed capital plan has (at most) 38,754 seats – and this if Cuomo’s “Smart School” bond act is approved. (806 more seats funded only for design)

  • Plan admits real need of 49,245 (though doesn’t explain how this figure was derived).

  • DOE’s consultants project enrollment increases of 60,000-70,000 students by 2021

  • At least 30,000 seats needed to alleviate current overcrowding for just those districts that average above 100%.

  • Conclusion: real need for seats at least 100,000.


Proposed capital plan vs. needs for seats part II

  • These figures do not capture overcrowding at neighborhood level, including schools with K waiting lists, or need to expand pre-K, reduce class size, restore cluster rooms, or provide space for charters as required in new state law.

  • Does not capture need to replace trailers with capacity of more than 10,890 seats.

  • Though DOE counts only 7,158 students attending class in TCUs, actual number is far higher & likely over 10,000.

  • Also, DOE utilization figures underestimate actual overcrowding according to most experts and Chancellor, who has appointed a “Blue Book” taskforce to improve them.

  • Revised utilization formula should be aligned to smaller classes, dedicated rooms for art, music, special education services, and more.


Class sizes have increased for six years in a row

  • Despite provisions in 2007 state law requiring NYC reduce class sizes, classes in K-3 in 2013-2014 largest since 1998; in grades 4-8 largest since 2002.

  • K-3 average class size was 24.9 (Gen Ed, inclusion & gifted classes) compared to 20.9 in 2007, increase of 19%.

  • In grades 4-8, the average class size was 26.8, compared to 25.1 in 2007 –increase of 6.8%.

  • HS “core” academic classes, class size average 26.7, up slightly since 2007.  (Yet DOE’s measure of HS class sizes is inaccurate and their methodology changes, so estimates cannot be relied upon.)

  • Averages do NOT tell the whole story – as more than 330,000 students were in classes of 30 or more in 2013-2014.

  • There were 40,268 kids in K-3 in classes of 30 or more in 2013-2014 – an increase of nearly 14% compared to the year before. 

  • The number of teachers decreased by over 5000 between 2007-2010, according to the Mayor’s Management Report, despite rising enrollment.


General ed, CTT and gifted: data from IBO 1998-2005; DOE 2006-2013


Gened, CTT and gifted: data from IBO 1998-2005; DOE 2006-2013


Class sizes in CSD 16 have increased in grades K-3 by 13.4% since 2006 and are now above Contracts for Excellence goals

Data sources: DOE Class Size Reports 2006-2013, 2007 DOE Contracts for Excellence Approved Plan


CSD 16’s class sizes in grades 4-8 have increased by 1.8% since 2007 and are slightly below Contracts for Excellence goals

Data sources: DOE Class Size Reports 2006-2013, 2007 DOE Contracts for Excellence Approved Plan


Class sizes city-wide have increased in core HS classes as well, by 2.3% since 2007, though the DOE data is unreliable*

*DOE’s class size data is unreliable &

their methodology for calculating HS averages have changed year to year

Data sources: DOE Class Size Reports 2006-2013, 2008 DOE Contracts for Excellence Approved Plan


CSD 16 Schools with large class sizes

  • In grades K-3, there are seven schools in District 16 with at least one grade with an average class size of 25 or more, according to DOE’s November 2013 report.

  • PS 262 El Hajj Malik El Shabazz and Young Scholars’ Academy for Discovery and Exploration have at least three grade levels in K-3 with 25 or more students.

  • In grades 4-8, 4 schools have at least one grade level with an average class size of 30 or more.

  • MS 035 Stephen Decatur has at least three grade levels with 30 or more students at the 4-8 level.


Examples of schools in CSD 16 with large class sizes, K-3


At least 30,000 seats currently needed just in districts averaging over 100%

*These figures are the difference between capacity & enrollment in the organizational target # in 2012-2013 Blue Book

Source: 2012-2013 DOE “Blue Book”


Average Utilization Rates in CSD 16 compared to City-Wide

Source: 2012-2013 DOE Blue Book


Over-utilization in ES and MS buildings in CSD 16 and Brooklyn HS

  • One elementary school building, PS 28 (112%) in CSD 16 is over-utilized. 29 seats are needed for this buildings to reach 100% utilization.

  • In Brooklyn, 21 high school buildings are at or over 100% building utilization. The seat need for these buildings is over 9,000.

  • Please note that the seat need here is higher because it takes into account all buildings that are over-utilized (100% or more) rather than the need averaged across the district.


21 Brooklyn HS buildings above 100% Utilization

*9,207 seats needed in Brooklyn to reduce building utilization to 100%


New Seats in Capital Plan and DOE Enrollment Projections for CSD 16

0

Enrollment projections estimate 358 to 1,183 new K-8 students in D16 by 2021 but capital plan adds ZERO seats.


City-wide Enrollment Projections K-8 vs. New Seats in Capital Plan

*Statistical Forecasting does not include D75 students; K-8 Seats in Capital Plan are categorized as Small PS and PS/IS and includes 4,900 seats for class size reduction if Bond issue passes.

Source for Housing Starts: NYSCA Projected New Housing Starts 2012-2021, http://www.nycsca.org/Community/CapitalPlanManagementReportsData/Housing/2012-21HousingWebChart.pdf; Projected public school ratio, https://data.cityofnewyork.us/Education/Projected-Public-School-Ratio/n7ta-pz8k


City-wide Enrollment Projections HS vs. New Seats in Capital Plan

*Statistical Forecasting does not include D75 students; HS Seats in Capital Plan are categorized as IS/HS and does not include seats for class size reduction

Source for Housing Starts: NYSCA Projected New Housing Starts 2012-2021, http://www.nycsca.org/Community/CapitalPlanManagementReportsData/Housing/2012-21HousingWebChart.pdf; Projected public school ratio, https://data.cityofnewyork.us/Education/Projected-Public-School-Ratio/n7ta-pz8k


Also Kindergarten Waitlists in many neighborhoods


2014 Kindergarten Wait Lists in CSD 16

  • According to DOE, the wait list for zoned Kindergarten spots in 2014 is smaller citywide than in 2013, with 1,242 zoned students on wait lists as of April 21, 2014.

  • 19 of 32 school districts currently have at least one school with a waiting list.

  • 63 schools have zoned wait lists: 20 in Brooklyn, 17 in Queens, 11 in Manhattan, 11 in The Bronx, and 4 in Staten Island.

  • DOE less transparent than ever: the number of zoned students for particular schools if less than 10 is not revealed – and methodology for creating wait lists unexplained.

  • Over 7,000 families got none of their choices but unclear how many were put on wait list for their zoned school.

  • There were no schools in District 16 with zoned students on wait lists for Kindergarten.


Seats Need for CSD 16 and Brooklyn High Schools

  • The FY 2015-2019 Capital Plan that DOE will move forward with plans to add no seats in District 16.

  • 29 elementary school seats are needed to reduce building utilization rates at PS 28 in District 16.

  • Enrollment projections at the K-8 level suggest 350 to 1,200 new students by 2021.

  • A real seat need of at least 380 and as many as 1,200 seats will go unmet in District 16 with this capital plan.

  • At the high school level, while the average building utilization rate is at 88.6% for Brooklyn, 21 high school buildings remain over-utilized with 9,200 seats needed for the schools to reach 100% building utilization.

  • No seats are expected to be added to Brooklyn high schools in the current Capital Plan.


New charter provisions passed in state budget

  • Any charter co-located in a NYC school building cannot be evicted and has veto powers before they leave the building – even if they are expanding and squeezing out NYC public school students. 

  • This includes any charter co-location agreed to before 2014 – including the three Success charter schools approved right before Bloomberg left office.

  • Any new or charter school in NYC adding grade levels must be “provided access to facilities” w/in five months of asking for it.

  • If they don’t like the space offered by the city, they can appeal to the Commissioner King, who is a former charter school director and has never ruled against a charter school.

  • NO FISCAL IMPACT statement or analysis accompanying this bill.

  • In addition, the state will provide all charter schools with per-pupil funding increases, amounting to $500 over the next 3 years and provide them funding for pre-K.


Charter space provisions ONLY apply to NYC

  • Upstate legislators fought off making charters eligible for state facilities funds – which would have been better for NYC.

  • Yet legislators did not block these onerous provisions for NYC , where we have the most expensive real estate & the most overcrowded schools in the state.

  • If the DOE doesn’t offer charter schools free space, the city  must pay for a school’s rent in private space or give them an extra 20 percent over their operating aid every year going forward.

  • After the city spends $40 million per year on charter rent, the state will begin chipping in 60% of additional cost.


How many charters will there be entitled to free space?

  • We have 183 charters in NYC, 119 in co-located space.

  • 22 new charters are approved to open next year or the year after, all entitled to free space.

  • 52 additional charter schools left to approve until we reach the cap raised in 2010 – with legislative approval – all entitled to free space.

  • Any new or existing co-located charter can also be authorized to expand grade levels through HS and will be entitled to free space.

  • DOE will be paying $5.4 M in annual rent for four years for 3 Success Academy schools that only have 484 students next year – at a cost of $11,000 per student.

  • This doesn’t count the unknown renovation costs in these 3 schools, also paid for by the city.


Blue book data & Utilization formula inaccurate & underestimates actual level of overcrowding

  • Class sizes in grades 4-12 larger than current averages & far above goals in city’s C4E plan & will likely force class sizes upwards

  • Doesn’t require full complement of cluster rooms or special needs students to have dedicated spaces for their mandated services

  • Doesn’t properly account for students now housed in trailers in elementary and middle schools.

  • Doesn’t account for co-locations which subtract about 10% of total space and eat up classrooms with replicated administrative & cluster rooms. Small schools use space less efficiently

  • Instructional footprint shrank full size classroom only 500 sq. feet min., risking building code/safety violations at many schools as 20-35 sq feet per student required.

  • Special ed classrooms defined as only 240-499 sq ft, thought State Ed guidelines call for 75 sq ft per child with special needs; classrooms this small would allow only 3- 7 students.


Comparison of class sizes in Blue book compared to current averages & Contract for excellence goals

*DOE reported HS class sizes unreliable


Some Recommendations

  • 38,000 seats in capital plan is too low, esp. given existing overcrowding, projected enrollment, preK expansion, class size reduction, new mandates to provide charter schools with space

  • Also very low as compared to Mayor’s plan to create or preserve 200,000 affordable housing units.

  • Council should expand the seats in five year capital plan.

  • Commission an independent analysis by City Comptroller, IBO or other agency.

  • Adopt reforms to planning process so that schools are built along with housing in future through mandatory inclusionary zoning, impact fees etc.

  • Over half of all states and 60% of large cities have impact fees, requiring developers to pay for costs of infrastructure improvements, including schools.


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