Commitment profiles in greece
Download
1 / 20

COMMITMENT PROFILES IN GREECE - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 61 Views
  • Uploaded on

COMMITMENT PROFILES IN GREECE. Yannis Markovits, Rolf Van Dick, & Ann Davis Aston University, Birmingham contact: [email protected] 12 th EUROPEAN CONGRESS OF WORK & ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 12 – 15 May 2005, Istanbul. Overview. Background Study 1 (private sector)

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' COMMITMENT PROFILES IN GREECE' - vesta


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Commitment profiles in greece
COMMITMENT PROFILES IN GREECE

Yannis Markovits, Rolf Van Dick,

& Ann Davis

Aston University, Birmingham

contact: [email protected]

12th EUROPEAN CONGRESS OF WORK & ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY12 – 15 May 2005, Istanbul


Overview
Overview

  • Background

  • Study 1 (private sector)

  • Study 2 (public sector)

  • Conclusions


Background
Background

  • Commitment generally positively correlated with job attitudes and behaviours (Meyer, Stanley, Herscovitch & Topolnytsky, 2002)

  • Recently: Profiles, i.e. interactions between forms of commitment (AC, NC, CC) have been introduced and found to be relevant for predicting focal and discretionary behaviours (Meyer & Herscovitch, 2001), commitment to change (Hercovitch & Meyer, 2002), turnover intentions and loyal boosterism (Wasti, 2004) and intention to stay (Gellatly, Meyer & Luchak, 2004)

  • To test it in a different context (Greece) with respect to different correlates (intrinsic and extrinsic satisfaction)


Job satisfaction
JOB SATISFACTION

  • Extrinsic satisfaction:

    • e.g., wages level

    • equal and just treatment of employees

    • security and safety

    • co-worker relations

  • Intrinsic satisfaction:

    • e.g., opportunity to use own abilities

    • promotion opportunities

    • feeling of accomplishment

    • chances to be creative


Study 1 private sector
Study 1PRIVATE SECTOR

  • Sample size: 1,119 employees from Northern Central part of Greece answered the Job Satisfaction Scale and the Organizational Commitment Scale based on Cook and Wall

  • Response rate: 69%

  • 45.3% men

  • Mean age: 30

  • Educational level: 38.2% Secondary education, 29.3% Technological Educational Institute, 32.6% University


Study 1 questionnaire
Study 1 QUESTIONNAIRE

  • Job Satisfaction:

    • Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ) (Weiss, Dawis, England & Lofquist, 1967)

    • Warr, Cook & Wall (1979). Job satisfaction scale– extrinsic satisfaction and intrinsic satisfaction

  • Organizational commitment:

    • British Organizational Commitment Scale (BOCS) (Cook & Wall, 1980)

    • Lawler & Hall (1970), Mowday, Steers & Porter (1979), and Buchanan (1974)

      • Organizational commitment scale: organizational identification, job involvement and loyalty


Study 1 commitment profiles cook wall
Study 1COMMITMENT PROFILES(Cook & Wall)


Study 1 hypotheses
Study 1 HYPOTHESES

  • Hypothesis 1: Employees in the private sector are more extrinsically and intrinsically satisfied with their jobs, if they are totally organizationally committed (P8)

  • Hypothesis 2: Employees in the private sector are highly extrinsically and intrinsically satisfied with their jobs, if they are, at least, feel identified with their organizations (P5-8 > P1-4)

  • Hypothesis 3: Profiles that contain identification are generally higher on intrinsic satisfaction, whereas profiles without identification are generally higher on extrinsicsatisfaction (ES: P1-4 > P5-8; IS: P1-4 < P5-8)


Study 1 results

H1

H2

H3

Study 1RESULTS

3-way-interaction

ES: F(7,1118)=11.83, p<.01

IS: F(7,1118)=25.08, p<.01


Study 1 implications
Study 1IMPLICATIONS

  • Employees job satisfied (extrinsically and intrinsically) > organizationally committed to organization

  • Human Resource Managers provide organizational environment that employees feel identified


Study 2 public sector
Study 2PUBLIC SECTOR

  • Sample size: 476 employees from Northern part of Greece answered the Job Satisfaction Scale, the Organizational Commitment Scale based on Cook & Wall and Meyer, Allen & Smith’s Organizational Commitment Scales

  • Response rate: 62%

  • 47.3% men

  • Mean age: 39

  • Educational level: 11.6% Secondary education, 21.4% Technological Educational Institute, 67% University


Study 2 questionnaire
Study 2QUESTIONNAIRE

  • Job Satisfaction:

    • Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ) (Weiss, Dawis, England & Lofquist, 1967)

    • Warr, Cook & Wall (1979). Job satisfaction– extrinsic satisfaction and intrinsic satisfaction

  • Organizational commitment:

    • British Organizational Commitment Scale (BOCS) (Cook & Wall, 1980).

    • Lawler & Hall (1970), Mowday, Steers & Porter (1979), and Buchanan (1974)

      • Organizational commitment scale: organizational identification, job involvement and loyalty

    • Meyer, Allen & Smith’s (1993) Organizational Commitment Scales

      • (Affective commitment scale, Continuance commitment scale and Normative commitment scale)


Study 2 commitment profiles meyer allen smith

Study 2COMMITMENT PROFILES (Meyer, Allen & Smith)


Study 2 hypotheses
Study 2HYPOTHESES

  • Hypothesis 4: Employees in the public sector are more extrinsically and intrinsically satisfied with their jobs, if they are totally organizationally committed(P8; C8)

  • Hypothesis 5: Employees in the public sector are highly extrinsically and intrinsically satisfied with their jobs, if they are, at least, feel identified with their organizations or affectively committed(P5-8 > P1-4; C5-8 > C1-4)

  • Hypothesis 6: Profiles that contain identification (or AC) are generally higher on intrinsic satisfaction whereas profiles without identification (or AC) are generally higher on extrinsicsatisfaction(ES: P1-4 > P5-8; IS: P1-4 < P5-8) ; (ES: C1-4 > C5-8; IS: C1-4 < C5-8)


Study 2 results cook wall

H2

H1

H3

Study 2RESULTS(Cook & Wall)

3-way-interaction

ES: F(7,475)=5.14, p<.05

IS: F(7,475)=0.03, ns


Study 2 results meyer allen smith

H1

H2

H3

Study 2RESULTS(Meyer, Allen & Smith)

3-way-interaction

ES: F(7,475)=5.19, p<.05

IS: F(7,475)=13.10, p<.01


Study 2 implications
Study 2IMPLICATIONS

  • Public sector employees job satisfied (extrinsically and intrinsically) > organizationally committed to public authority

  • Directors and Human Resource officers of public sector organizations should provide organizational environment that employees feel identified and affectively committed


Conclusions
CONCLUSIONS

  • Interactions between forms of commitment seem to exist and be relevant for the employees’ mindsets

  • By and large, forms of identification, respectively affective commitment seem to be key

  • Strength and limitations:

    • Large samples, Replication across sectors

    • Cross-sections, self-reports


Added results 2006 meyer allen smith
ADDED RESULTS – 2006(Meyer, Allen & Smith)

3-way-interaction

F(7,233)=7.39, p<.01


Added results 2006 meyer allen smith1
ADDED RESULTS – 2006(Meyer, Allen & Smith)

3-way-interaction

F(7,233)=4.22, p<.05


ad