Jonathan Long and  Carl Skinner
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Jonathan Long and Carl Skinner With Contributions from the Science Synthesis Team USDA FS Pacific Southwest Research Station. Integration. Social. Ecological. Science Synthesis to support Forest Plan Revision in the Sierra Nevada and Southern Cascades. Outline.

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Science Synthesis to support Forest Plan Revision in the Sierra Nevada and Southern Cascades

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Science synthesis to support forest plan revision in the sierra nevada and southern cascades

Jonathan Long and Carl Skinner

With Contributions from the Science Synthesis Team

USDA FS Pacific Southwest Research Station

Integration

Social

Ecological

Science Synthesis to support Forest Plan Revision in the Sierra Nevada and Southern Cascades


Outline

Outline

  • Focal Question:Socioecological Resilience and Stressors

  • Integrative Approaches in the Synthesis

  • Integrating social and ecologicaI considerations

  • Restoring reference disturbance regimes and heterogeneity at multiple scales

  • Applying strategic treatment at landscape scale with adaptive management


Overarching question

Overarching Question 

  • “Based on recent scientific advances, what management strategies are likely to promote resilience of socioecological systems and sustain values-at-risk in the synthesis area over the short and long term given expected stressors?”


Resilience of socioecological systems

Resilience of Socioecological Systems

  • Broadly considers systems in an integrated fashion

Socioecological System

  • Connects to “ecological integrity” and “social and economic sustainability” in the Forest Planning Rule

Ecological Processes and Components

Social Processes and Components

Integration

Stressors


Interfaces with forest planning rule

Interfaces with Forest Planning Rule

  • “Opportunities for landscape scale restoration”

    • Analyzing larger areas and changes over longer time periods

  • “Emphasis on wildland fire and opportunities to restore fire adapted ecosystems”

    • Consider the large landscape scales at which fire operates


Stressors are creating novel conditions

Stressors are Creating Novel Conditions

  • Examples

    • Changing climate

    • Fire deficit and fuel build-up

    • Air pollution

    • Diseases (e.g., chytrid)

    • Invasive species

  •  Novel conditions

    • Need forward-thinking reference conditions

    • Evaluate synergistic effects

Changes in fire regime (blue is less frequent fire)

Nitrogen deposition


Integrative approaches in the synthesis

Integrative Approaches in the Synthesis

Integrating consideration of social and ecological systems

Restoring disturbance regimes in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems

Promoting large-scale adaptive management

Social Processes and Components

Ecological Processes and Components

Integration


1 integrating social and ecologicai considerations

1) Integrating social and ecologicaI considerations

  • Build upon existing community capacity by incorporating traditional and local ecological knowledge and facilitating social learning

  • Reduce vulnerabilities to major disruptions

  • Identify important socioecological values and promote community well-being


1a build upon existing community capacity to promote resilience

1A) Build upon existing community capacity to promote resilience

Important concepts and approaches

  • Community well-being

  • Sense of place

  • All lands approach

  • Collaboration

  • Traditional and local ecological knowledge

  • Social learning


1b reduce vulnerabilities to major disruptions

1B) Reduce vulnerabilities to major disruptions

  • Uncharacteristically large, severe, and dangerous wildfires

    • Short and long-term social, economic, and ecological impacts

Hazardous wildfire conditions threaten community well-being

Large patches of high-severity wildfire threaten ecological values


1c identify important socioecological values

1C) Identify important socioecological values

  • Wide range of ecosystem services and other social and economic benefits

    • Biodiversity and habitat

    • Favorable water flows

    • Forest products,traditional cultural resources and associated livelihoods and infrastructure

Index of wildland fire threat to forests important to surface drinking water

  • Integrated, applied socioecological research


1c consider opportunities to promote community well being

1C) Consider opportunities to promote community well-being

  • Consider impacts on local communities and economies in treatment design

  • Pursue opportunities to facilitate joint benefits for social and ecological systems


2 restoring reference disturbance regimes and heterogeneity

2) Restoring reference disturbance regimes and heterogeneity

  • Applying fire in concert with silvicultural treatments to reestablish fire regimes and heterogeneity at multiple scales

  • Designing treatments based upon reference disturbance regimes and ecological trajectories

Terrestrial Systems andAquatic Systems


2a applying fire with silvicultural treatments to restore process and heterogeneity

2A) Applying fire with silvicultural treatments to restore process and heterogeneity

 Considering reference fire regime and other ecological and social factors at multiple scales

Fire regime

Topography

Fine-scale patchiness


2b designing treatments based upon reference fire regimes and ecological trajectories

2B) Designing treatments based upon reference fire regimes and ecological trajectories

  • Forested riparian areas

  • Wildlife core areas

  • Post-fire landscapes

Hat Creek within the Reading Fire (2012)

  • Identify areas that may benefit from treatment to reduce potential impacts from uncharacteristically severe wildfires but need more research especially on long-term effects


2c consider conditions across forest types

2C) Consider conditions across forest types

  • Important habitat and biodiversity values

  • Altered fire regime and changing climate

    • increases in uncharacteristically severe wildfire

    • shifting precipitation

Upper montane red fir forest with repeated fires


3 applying strategic treatment with adaptive management

3) Applying strategic treatment with adaptive management

  • Use large-scale experimental areas

  • Evaluate active management for riparian and wildlife zones

  • Apply phased approach to treatment

  • Address research gaps

Riparian area in Stanislaus-Tuolumne Experimental Forest


3a large scale experimental areas

3A) Large scale experimental areas

  • Most existing experimental areas are too small to evaluate dynamics of wildlife with large home ranges

  • Larger areas such as the owl demographic study areas offer an opportunity to conduct adaptive management projects designed to address research gaps


Science synthesis to support forest plan revision in the sierra nevada and southern cascades

Treatment

  • 3B) Evaluate Management to Sustain Wildlife at Landscape Scales

Wildfire

Home Range

Resting site

Landscape


3c apply phased strategic approach to treatment at landscape scale

3C) Apply phased strategic approach to treatment at landscape scale

  • Strategic defensive fuels reduction

  • Reclamation treatments in a fraction of the landscape

     Need to evaluate that fraction using models in an adaptive management framework

  • Maintenance and rotation throughout the landscape in conjunction with managed wildfire and with adaptation to all wildfires


3d example of research gaps evaluate impacts of wildfires

3D) Example of Research Gaps: Evaluate Impacts of Wildfires

  • Social and ecological values

    • Watersheds and streams

    • Soci0economic values

    • Wildlife

  • Long-term and re-burn effects

Chips Fire (2012) reburned study areas of the Storrie Fire (2000)


Questions and discussion

Questions and Discussion

Science Synthesis Integration


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