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Chapter 9. Accounting for Inventories. Inventory. Retailers: finished goods held for sale; balances can be large (77% of current asset & 25% of total assets for Wal-Mart) Manufacturers: raw materials, work-in-progress & finished goods

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Chapter 9

Chapter 9

Accounting for Inventories


Inventory
Inventory

  • Retailers: finished goods held for sale; balances can be large (77% of current asset & 25% of total assets for Wal-Mart)

  • Manufacturers: raw materials, work-in-progress & finished goods

  • Inventory efficiency (e.g., as measured by inventory turnover) especially important for manufacturers

  • Potential problems with obsolete inventory; note potential write-downs based on inventory impairment

  • Historically, several inventory fraud cases

  • Inventory usually not an issue with service companies



Inventory systems
Inventory Systems

  • Two systems for maintaining inventory records:

  • Perpetual system

  • Periodic system


Perpetual system
Perpetual System

  • Purchases of merchandise are debited to Inventory.

  • Freight-in, purchase returns and allowances, and purchase discounts are recorded in Inventory.

  • Cost of Goods Sold is debited and Inventory is credited for each sale.

  • Physical count done to verify inventory balance.

    The perpetual inventory system provides a continuous record of Inventory and Cost of Goods Sold.


Periodic system
Periodic System

  • Purchases of merchandise are debited to Purchases.

  • Ending Inventory determined by physical count.

  • Calculation of cost of goods sold:

  • Beginning inventory $ 100,000

  • Purchases, net 800,000

  • Goods available for sale900,000

  • Ending inventory 125,000

  • Cost of goods sold $ 775,000


System comparison
System Comparison

  • Perpetual System Periodic System


Inventory valuation
Inventory Valuation

  • Requires:

  • The physical goods (goods on hand, goods in transit, consigned goods, special sales agreements).

  • The costs to include (product vs. period costs).

  • The cost flow assumption (FIFO, LIFO, Average cost, Specific Identification, Retail, etc.).


Physical goods
Physical Goods

  • A company should record purchases when it obtains legal title to the goods.

  • Special Consideration:

  • Goods in transit (FOB shipping point, FOB destination)

  • Consigned goods


Costs included in inventory
Costs Included in Inventory

  • Product Costs - costs directly connected with bringing the goods to the buyer’s place of business and converting such goods to a salable condition.

  • Period Costs – generally selling, general, and administrative expenses.


Cost flow assumptions
Cost Flow Assumptions

  • Young & Crazy Company makes the following purchases:

    • One item on 2/2/07 for $10

    • One item on 2/15/07 for $15

    • One item on 2/25/07 for $20

  • Young & Crazy Company sells one item on 2/28/08 for $90. What would be the balance of ending inventory and cost of goods sold for the month ended Feb. 2008, assuming the company used the FIFO, LIFO, Average Cost, and Specific Identification cost flow assumptions? Assume a tax rate of 30%.


First in first out
First-in First Out

  • Young & Crazy Company

  • Income Statement

  • For the Month of Feb. 2008

  • Sales $ 90

  • Cost of goods sold 10

  • Gross profit 80

  • Expenses:

  • Administrative 14

  • Selling 12

  • Interest 7

  • Total expenses 33

  • Income before tax 47

  • Taxes 14

  • Net Income $ 33


Last in first out lifo
Last-in First Out (LIFO)

  • Young & Crazy Company

  • Income Statement

  • For the Month of Feb. 2008

  • Sales $ 90

  • Cost of goods sold 20

  • Gross profit 70

  • Expenses:

  • Administrative 14

  • Selling 12

  • Interest 7

  • Total expenses 33

  • Income before tax 37

  • Taxes 11

  • Net Income $ 26


Average cost
Average Cost

  • Young & Crazy Company

  • Income Statement

  • For the Month of Feb. 2008

  • Sales $ 90

  • Cost of goods sold 15

  • Gross profit 75

  • Expenses:

  • Administrative 14

  • Selling 12

  • Interest 7

  • Total expenses 33

  • Income before tax 42

  • Taxes 12

  • Net Income $ 30



Perpetual vs periodic
Perpetual vs. Periodic

  • Inventory information for Part 686 for the month of June.

  • June 1 Beg. Balance 300 units @ $10 = $ 3,000

  • 10 Sold 200 units @ $24

  • 11 Purchased 800 units @ $12 = 9,600

  • 15 Sold 500 units @ $25

  • 20 Purchased 500 units @ $13 = 6,500

  • 27 Sold 300 units @ $27

  • Assuming the Perpetual Inventory Method, compute the Cost of Goods Sold and Ending Inventory under FIFO, LIFO, and Average cost.

  • Assuming the Periodic Inventory Method, compute the Cost of Goods Sold and Ending Inventory under FIFO, LIFO, and Average cost.

    [goods available: $19,100]








Lifo reserve
LIFO Reserve

  • LIFO Reserveis the difference between the inventory method used for internal reporting purposes and LIFO.

  • FIFO value per books $160,000

  • LIFO value 145,000

  • LIFO Reserve $ 15,000

  • Journal Entry:

  • Cost of Goods Sold 15,000

  • LIFO Reserve 15,000


Lifo liquidation
LIFO Liquidation

  • Older, low cost inventory is sold resulting in a lower cost of goods sold, higher net income, and higher taxes.


Dollar value lifo
Dollar-value LIFO

  • Changes in a pool are measured in terms of total dollar value, not physical quantity.

  • Advantage:

    • Broader range of goods in pool.

    • Permits replacement of goods that are similar.

    • Helps protect LIFO layers from erosion.


Lifo comparisons
LIFO Comparisons

  • Specific-goods LIFO - costing goods on a unit basis is expensive and time consuming.

  • Specific-goods Pooled LIFO approach

    • Reduces record keeping and clerical costs.

    • More difficult to erode the layers.

    • Using quantities as measurement basis can lead to untimely LIFO liquidations.

  • Dollar-value LIFOis used by most companies.


LIFO

  • LIFO is generally preferred:

    • if selling prices are increasing faster than costs and

    • if a company has a fairly constant “base stock.”

  • LIFO not appropriate:

    • if prices tend to lag behind costs,

    • if specific identification traditionally used, and

    • when unit costs tend to decrease as production increases.


LIFO

  • Advantages:

  • Matching

  • Tax benefits/Improved cash flow

  • Disadvantages:

  • Reduced earnings

  • Inventory understated

  • Physical flow

  • Involuntary liquidation / Poor buying habits


Lower of cost or market lcm
Lower of Cost or Market (LCM)

  • A company abandons the historical cost principle when the future utility (revenue-producing ability) of the asset drops below its original cost.

  • Market = Replacement cost

  • Lower of cost or replacement cost

  • Loss should be recorded when loss occurs, not in the period of sale.


Lcm ceilings floors
LCM—Ceilings & Floors

  • Why use Replacement Cost (RC) for Market?

  • Decline in the RC usually = decline in selling price.

  • RC allows a consistent rate of gross profit.

  • If reduction in RC fails to indicate reduction in utility, then two additional valuation limitations are used:

    • Ceiling - Net realizable value and

    • Floor- Net realizable value less a normal profit margin.

  • Ceiling – prevents overstatement of the value of obsolete, damaged, or shopworn inventories.

  • Floor – deters understatement of inventory and overstatement of the loss in the current period.



Lcm deficiencies
LCM Deficiencies

  • Expense recorded when loss in utility occurs. Profit on sale recognized at the point of sale.

  • Inventory valued at cost in one year and at market in the next year.

  • Net income in year of loss is lower. Net income in subsequent period may be higher than normal if expected reductions in sales price do not materialize.

  • LCM uses a “normal profit” in determining inventory values, which is a subjective measure.


Presentation analysis
Presentation & Analysis

  • Presentation:

  • composition of the inventory,

  • financing arrangements, and

  • costing methods employed.

    Analysis:

    Common ratios used in the management and evaluation of inventory levels are inventory turnover and average days to sell the inventory.


Analysis inventory turnover
Analysis: Inventory Turnover

  • Measures the number of times on average a company sells the inventory during the period.


Analysis average days inventory
Analysis: Average Days Inventory

  • = 365/ Inventory Turnover =

    365 days / 8 times = every 45.6 days

  • Measure represents the average number of days’ sales for which a company has inventory on hand.


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