Curriculum design and instruction
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Curriculum Design and Instruction. Week 4. Common Core Standards Overview. Session 5. A PDF copy is located in the Student Resource Folder. Unless otherwise cited the content from this section is referenced from: Web Source: http://www.ccsso.org/.

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Curriculum design and instruction

Curriculum Design and Instruction

Week 4


Common core standards overview

Common Core Standards Overview

Session 5

A PDF copy is located in the Student Resource Folder

  • Unless otherwise cited the content from this section is referenced from:

  • Web Source: http://www.ccsso.org/

Benedictine University


Curriculum design and instruction

COUNCIL OF CHIEF STATE SCHOOL OFFICERS (CCSSO)

&

NATIONAL GOVERNORS ASSOCIATION

CENTER FOR BEST PRACTICES

(NGA CENTER)

JUNE 2010

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Overview

Overview

  • The Common Core State Standards[CCSS] weredesigned to provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn across the United States, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them

  • The Illinois State Board of Education adopted the new academic standards for K-12 education in July of 2010

    • To better prepare Illinois students for success in college and the workforce in a competitive global economy

  • Illinois’ previous standards were adopted in 1997

Unless otherwise indicated the slides from this section are from the ISBE website: http://www.isbe.state.il.us/

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Development of standards

Development of Standards

  • The Common Core State Standards were developed through a process led by U.S. states to craft academic standards that establish clear and consistent benchmarks for essential learning and skills

  • The standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers

  • American students must be fully prepared for the future,

    • The CCSS positions our communities to successfully compete in the global economy

Web Source: http://www.corestandards.org/in-the-states

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What are the common core state standards

What are the Common Core State Standards?

CCSS:

  • Are aligned with college and work expectations

  • Are focused and coherent

  • Include rigorous content and application of knowledge through high-order skills

  • Are built upon strengths and lessons of current state standards

  • Are internationally benchmarked so that all students are prepared to succeed in our global economy and society

  • Are based on evidence and research

  • Are state led – coordinated by NGA Center and CCSSO

Web Source: http://www.corestandards.org/in-the-states


States that have adopted the common core standards

States that have adopted the Common Core Standards

  • Web Source: http://www.corestandards.org/in-the-states

  • This web site monitors state adoption of the CCSS

  • If you would like to keep track of CCSS adoptions by state, check back to this web site.

Web Source: http://www.corestandards.org/in-the-states

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First set of common core standards

First Set of Common Core Standards

  • The first Common Core Standards are developed for the K-12 areas of mathematics and English-language arts

  • Math and English standards were developed first because they teach skills upon which students build skill sets in other areas of learning

  • Subsequent standards will be adopted for Science and Social Studies

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Bridge to the workplace

Bridge to the Workplace

  • The standards define the level of knowledge and skills that students should possess from their K-12 education

  • By achieving these standards, students will be prepared to enter college and training programs and be well prepared to join the workforce

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College and career readiness skills

College and Career Readiness Skills

The Common Core Standards emphasize the following skills for all students:

  • Demonstrate independence

  • Build strong content knowledge

  • Respond to varying demands of audience, task, and purpose

  • Comprehend as well as critique

  • Value evidence

  • Use technology and digital media strategically and capably

  • Come to understand other perspectives and cultures

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Why is this important

Why is this important?

  • Currently, every state has its own set of academic standards

  • Which means publicly educated students in each state are learning to different levels or standards

  • All students must be prepared to compete with, not only their American peers in the next state, but with students from around the world

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Standards development process

Standards Development Process

  • College and career readiness standards were developed in summer 2009

  • Based on the college and career readiness standards, K-12 learning progressions/standards were developed to support students’ ability to be successful in higher or continuing educational endeavors

  • Multiple (and rigorous) rounds of feedback from states, teachers, researchers, higher education, and the general public were conducted to strengthen the CCSS

  • The final Common Core State Standards released on June 2, 2010

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Common core standards

Common Core Standards

  • Unless otherwise cited the content from this section is referenced from:

  • Web Source: http://www.ccsso.org/

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Design of new k 12 ela standards

Design of New K-12 ELA Standards

The K-12 ELA Standards:

  • Are benchmarked to College and Career Readiness Standards

  • Listed the K-8 standards by grade level

  • The 9-12 standards are organized in two year bands to allow flexibility in course design

  • Are separated into four strands: Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening

    • The four strands are currently aligned and tested on the ACCESS test for ELL students

      Adapted from ISBE website

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Ccss design and organization

CCSS Design and Organization

Three main sections:

  • K−5 (cross-disciplinary)

  • 6−12 English Language Arts

  • 6−12 Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

  • Shared responsibility for students’ literacy development

    Three appendices:

  • Appendix A: Research and evidence; glossary of key terms

  • Appendix B: Reading text exemplars; sample performance tasks

  • Appendix C: Annotated student writing samples

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Curriculum design and instruction

Four strands

Reading (including Reading Foundational Skills)

Writing

Speaking and Listening

Language

An integrated model of literacy

Media requirements blended throughout

CCSS Design and Organization

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Curriculum design and instruction

CCSS Design and Organization

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College and Career Readiness (CCR)

anchor standards

  • Broad expectations consistent across grades and content areas

  • Based on evidence

    about college and

    workforce training

    expectations

  • Range and content


Curriculum design and instruction

CCSS Design and Organization

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K−12 standards

  • Grade-specific end-of-year expectations

  • Developmentally appropriate, cumulative progression of skills and understandings

  • One-to-one correspondence with CCR standards


Reading

Reading

Comprehension (standards 1−9)

  • Standards for reading literature and informational texts

  • Strong and growing across-the-curriculum emphasis on

    students’ ability to read and comprehend informational texts

  • Aligned with NAEP Reading framework

    Range of reading and level of text complexity(standard 10, Appendices A and B)

  • “Staircase” of growing text complexity across grades

  • High-quality literature and informational texts in a range

    of genres and subgenres

Comprehension (standards 1−9)

  • Standards for reading literature and informational texts

  • Strong and growing across-the-curriculum emphasis on

    students’ ability to read and comprehend informational texts

  • Aligned with NAEP Reading framework

    Range of reading and level of text complexity(standard 10, Appendices A and B)

  • “Staircase” of growing text complexity across grades

  • High-quality literature and informational texts in a range

    of genres and subgenres

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Reading foundational skills

Reading Foundational Skills

Four categories (Standards 1−4)

  • Print concepts (K−1)

  • Phonological awareness (K−1)

  • Phonics and word recognition (K−5)

  • Fluency (K−5)

  • Not an end in-and-of themselves

  • Differentiated instruction

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Writing

Writing

Writing types/purposes (Standards 1−3)

  • Writing arguments

  • Writing informative/explanatory texts

  • Writing narratives

  • Strong and growing across-the-curriculum emphasis on students writing arguments and informative/explanatory texts

  • Aligned with NAEP Writing framework

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Curriculum design and instruction

Writing

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Production and distribution of writing (Standards 4−6)

  • Developing and strengthening writing

  • Using technology to produce and enhance writing

    Research (Standards 7−9)

  • Engaging in research and writing about sources

    Range of writing (Standard 10)

  • Writing routinely over various time frames


Language

Language

Conventions of standard English

Knowledge of language (Standards 1−3)

  • Using standard English in formal writing and speaking

  • Using language effectively and recognizing language varieties

    Vocabulary (Sandards 4−6)

  • Determining word meanings and word nuances

  • Acquiring general academic and domain-specific words and phrases

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Speaking and listening

Speaking and Listening

Comprehension and collaboration (Standards 1−3)

Day-to-day, purposeful academic talk in one-on-one,

small-group, and large-group settings

Presentation of knowledge and ideas (Standards 4−6)

Formal sharing of information and concepts, including through the use of technology

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Key advances

Key Advances

Reading

  • Balance of literature and informational texts

  • Text complexity

    Writing

  • Emphasis on argument and informative/explanatory writing

  • Writing about sources

    Speaking and Listening

  • Inclusion of formal and informal talk

    Language

  • Stress on general academic and domain-specific vocabulary

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Intentional design limitations

Intentional Design Limitations

What the Standards do NOT define:

  • How teachers should teach

  • All that can or should be taught

  • The nature of advanced work beyond the core

  • The interventions needed for students well below grade level

  • The full range of support for English language learners and students with special needs

  • Everything needed to be college and career ready

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Conclusions

Conclusions

Standards: Important, but insufficient

  • To be effective in improving education and getting all students ready for college, workforce training, and life…

  • The Standards must be partnered with a content-rich curriculum and robust assessments, both aligned to the Standards

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Curriculum design and instruction

Conclusions

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The Promise of Standards

  • These Standards are not intended to be new names for old ways of doing business

  • They are a call to take the next step

  • It is time for states to work together to build on lessons learned from two decades of standards-based reforms

  • It is time to recognize that standards are not just promises to our children, but promises we intend to keep


Curriculum design and instruction

You can ask questions by typing your question into the Q&A panel and

clicking "send“

Webinar recording will be available at www.corestandards.org

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More information

More Information

www.corestandards.org

For more information

and to post a video of support

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