Population Overview
Download
1 / 41

Population Overview How is human population distributed and concentrated? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 115 Views
  • Uploaded on

Population Overview How is human population distributed and concentrated? Population Growth and Change Measures for population change Population Structure Population pyramids Theories on Variation in Population Growth Malthus and the Transition Theory Case Studies China’s One Child Policy

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Population Overview How is human population distributed and concentrated?' - venecia-arthur


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

Population Overview

How is human population distributed and concentrated?

Population Growth and Change

Measures for population change

Population Structure

Population pyramids

Theories on Variation in Population Growth

Malthus and the Transition Theory

Case Studies

China’s One Child Policy

Kerala, India and Social Justice


Moscow, Russia

Jaipur, India


1900=2 billion

1965=3.3 billion

2000=6 billion

2011=7 billion


Where is

Human

Population

Distributed?


World Population Cartogram, 1900

Note: the size of Japan’s and China’s populations. Also note the size of Europe’s population—what happens to it over the next 50 years?


World Population Cartogram, 2000

This cartogram provides a good image of the current distribution of human

population on earth. Are you surprised by the size of the population in any

particular region or country?


World Population Cartogram, 2050 (projected)

This cartogram illustrates the human population as it will most likely be in 2050. What regions have lost population? Any surprises? Notice what has happened to China’s population since 1900.


Another view of the world s population cartogram
Another view of the World’s Population Cartogram

  • This cartogram clearly illustrates which countries have the largest populations. What region of the world clearly dominates in human population numbers? Which regions have the fewest people?


Where is human population concentrated?

Major Clusters:

East Asia (1/4 of world’s population)

South Asia (1/4 of world’s population)

Europe

Southeast Asia (600 million)


How is population

density calculated?

Arithmetic Density

Simple calculation of persons/land area

Physiological Density

Explains uneven

distribution of humans across Earth


Agricultural Density

Reflects differences in economic conditions.




Crude Birth Rate:

Births per 1,000

Crude Death Rate:

Deaths per 1,000



Total Fertility Rates (TFR):

average number of children per childbearing years per woman

Niger: 7.16 South Korea: 1.23

Mali: 6.35 Singapore: 0.78

Italy: 1.40




  • View the interactive population pyramid for Australia at:

    • http://www.abs.gov.au/websitedbs/d3310114.nsf/home/Population%20Pyramid%20-%20Australia

    • Note the changes for Australia’s population by 2056—what age group will be largest?

  • Or an animated population pyramid for Germany:

    • http://vimeo.com/7687560

    • How has Germany’s population significantly changed since 1950 and what challenges will these changes bring for the country




What explains variations in population growth?

What is the future of human population growth?



Demographic Transition Theory:

Stage 1: Low Growth

Stage 2: High Growth

Stage 3: Slowing Growth

Stage 4: Low Growth


England’s Demographic Transition:

What causes death rates to drop in 1750?


Cape verde s population pyramid and demographic transition
Cape Verde’s Population Pyramid and Demographic Transition


Chile’s Population Pyramid and Demographic Transition


Denmark’s Population Pyramid and Demographic Transition



Why no transition in some countries?

What are the social and economic conditions that lead to large families?


I CAN’T GET A DATE!!

“As a result, approximately 30 million more men than women will reach

Adulthood and enter China’s mating market by 2020.” CNN


Fareed Zakaria on China’s “Looming Demographic Catastrophe”

http://www.cnn.com/2012/11/14/opinion/china-challenges-one-child-brooks


Case study kerala india
Case Study: Kerala, India Catastrophe”

  • Successful Demographic Transition with the Optimist Approach

    • One of the lowest birth rates in India

    • But a largely agriculturally based society, largely poor and rural

    • Achieved not through strict population policy, but through a program of Social Justice

      • Emphasis on education—for both boys and girls

      • Emphasis on health—lowering the IMR, keeping women healthy

      • Emphasis on rural development—bringing jobs and income to people in rural areas, rather than having families split by migration as one member travels to the nearest city to find work.

    • Read more on Kerala:

      • http://www.ashanet.org/library/articles/kerala.199803.html

      • http://www.indiatogether.org/2008/mar/opi-kerala.htm


The Kerala Model Catastrophe”


Case study bangladesh
Case Study: Bangladesh Catastrophe”

Muhammed Yunus and the

recipient of a microloan.

  • Bangladesh has not seen much improvement in literacy or wealth

  • However, 56% of women were using contraception in 2011 (just 30 years ago only 6% were)

  • How did this transformation occur? It seems to contradict the traditional explanations for lowering fertility rates.

  • Read about the role of microloans, specifically through the Grameen Bank, in changing women’s financial circumstances:

    • The Grameen Bank: Bank for the Poor

    • Muhammad Yunus, Founder of the Grameen Bank

    • The Economist: Bangladesh & Development

    • New York Times: Bangladesh, Still Poor, Cuts Birth Rate Sharply


ad