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NOAA Learning Ocean Science through Ocean Exploration Curriculum

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NOAA Learning Ocean Science through Ocean Exploration Curriculum. Doing Inquiry-based Science with Students: Direct observation Manipulate variables under natural conditions Use model systems which can be manipulated in the classroom.

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slide1

NOAA Learning Ocean Science through Ocean Exploration Curriculum

  • Doing Inquiry-based Science with Students:
    • Direct observation
    • Manipulate variables under natural conditions
    • Use model systems which can be manipulated in the classroom
slide2

Learning Ocean Science through Ocean Exploration of necessity concentrates on using model systems.

  • Essential that students understand the relationship between the model and the real thing. OE website gives them access to the real thing.
slide3

LESSON PLAN 2

Page 16

A WATERED-DOWN

TOPOGRAPHIC MAP

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About 200 miles from Woods Hole, MA, flat-topped Bear Seamount rises approximately 2000 meters from the surrounding ocean floor to a depth of 1100 meters.

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Mid-ocean Ridge SystemEarth’s longest mountain range (35,000 miles)2/3 of Earth’s surface formed at mid-ocean ridges

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Above Sea Level

400’

300’

200’

100’

0

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Below Sea Level

100’

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200’

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400’

400’

500’

500’

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Land or Sea?

100’

100’

200’

200’

400’

300’

100’

200’

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300’

100’

300’

400’

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slide22

A Watered-down Topographic Map

  • Part 1
  • Students would use the descriptions to make the geologic features in a MODEL ocean. The geologic features have been pre-built with clay for this workshop in the interests of time.
  • Part 2
  • Read the cards to decide which feature you have. Follow the student worksheet to make a bathymetric contour map your feature.
  • Read all the instructions BEFORE you start!!
slide23

LESSON PLAN 4

Page 25

Mapping Deep-sea Features

slide24

Gulf of Alaska Expedition

False-color Multibeam Data Over Satellite Imagery

slide25

Mapping Deep-sea Features

Translate a data table into a false color image map and then into a 3-D model of a seamount

1. Use the Student Handout with depth ranges and the Bathymetric Data Reduction table to make a false color map.

2. Make a 3-D visualization of a seamount or a submarine canyon. Assemble the foam pieces in the same color order from deepest on the bottom to shallowest on top.

slide27

Bathymetric Map of Loihi Volcano, Hawaii’s Youngest, Off the Southeastern Coast of the Big Island

slide31

www.learningdemo.com/noaa/

NOAA Learning Object Lesson 4 Subduction Zones

Use “Bathymetric Maps” as a possible

follow-up activity/assessment activity

after Lesson Plans 2 and 4

slide32

LESSON PLAN 8

Page 64

The Biggest Plates on Earth

slide34

Convergent Plate Boundaries

Oceanic to Continental Oceanic to Oceanic

slide39

www.learningdemo.com/noaa/

NOAA Learning Object Lesson 2

Mid-ocean Ridges

Use “Seafloor Spreading Activity” as a

possible follow-up activity/assessment

activity after LP 8.

slide40

LESSON PLAN 9

Page 69

The Galapagos Spreading Center

slide43

www.learningdemo.com/noaa/

NOAA Learning Object Lesson 2

Mid-ocean Ridges

Use “Explore Mid-Ocean Ridges” as an introductory activity for LP 9.

Use last segment of “Lesson” to introduce formation of hydrothermal vents.

slide44

LESSON PLAN 11

Page 80

Volcanoes, Plates, Seamounts, and Island Chains

slide46

LP 8, 9 & 11 – Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts

EP 1 Earth has one big ocean with many

features

FC b. Ocean basins features vary due to

movement of Earth’s lithospheric plates.

EP 2 The ocean shapes Earth’s features

FC e. Tectonic activity influences physical

structure and landforms.

slide47

LESSON PLAN 13

Page 100

All That Glitters…

ocean zones
Ocean Zones

Many abiotic factors contribute to zonation in the

ocean: vertical and horizontal components

  • pressure, light, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, mineral nutrients

Vertical zonation is featured in the OE curriculum.

  • Examines light and the impact passing through water has on light in the ocean.
  • photic or epipelagic (0 - 200m)
  • mid-water or mesopelagic (200 - 1000m)
  • aphotic or bathypelagic (below 1000 m)
light zones in the ocean
Light Zones in the Ocean

PHOTIC/SUNLIGHT ZONE – 200 m.

Plants thrive, food relatively abundant

DYSPHOTIC/TWILIGHT ZONE – 1000 m

Dim light can not support plants, reduced food (20% of photic zone production), temps. 23 >> 4 degree C . (thermocline)

APHOTIC/MIDNIGHT ZONE-below 1000 m Perpetual darkness, only 5% of photic zone food production, 4 degree C. temp

color spectrum
COLOR SPECTRUM

ROYGBIV

LOWENERGY

>>>>

HIGH ENERGY

slide62

LP 13 & 14 – Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts

EP 5 Ocean supports great diversity of life

FC d. Ocean biology provides unique examples of adaptations

FC f. Ocean habitats defined by environmental factors…such as…light

slide63

LESSON PLAN 14

Page 105

Light at the Bottom of the Deep Dark Ocean

slide64
If you drag a net out in the open ocean from 1000 m to the surface, 80 to 90% of the animals caught (mostly fish, shrimp and squid) will be bioluminescent.  That doesn\'t include all the bioluminescent jellyfish that get shredded by the net.

- Dr. Edie Widder

slide66
Deep-sea fish, Photostomias guernei, with a built-in bioluminescent "flashlight“ to help it see in the dark.
slide67
Blackdevil angler fish with a luminescent lure used to attract prey & identify herself to potential mates
slide69

Ocean Explorer Web Site

  • http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov
slide70

Bioluminescence Resources

http://www.biolum.org/

+ Search “Bioluminescence” on OE Web site

slide71

www.learningdemo.com/noaa/

NOAA Learning Object Lesson 6

Deep Sea Benthos

Use “Bioluminescence – A Light in the

Darkness” with Lesson Plans 13 & 14

slide72

How might these lessons fit into your current curriculum?

  • Do you see opportunities for integration with other subject teachers at your school?
  • Can you think of other teachers who might be interested in this curriculum and Web site?
  • What kinds of strategies might you use for activities within the OE curriculum?
slide73

Sea to Shining Sea Map

Add this Web site to your map:

http://www.mcbi.org/shining_sea/s2ss_globe.htm

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