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Regional Workforce Demands. Maximizing Labor Market Responsiveness. Presenters. Chabot College: Ron Taylor, Vice President, Academic Services Tom Clark, Dean of Applied Technology and Business Carolyn Arnold, Coordinator, Institutional Research & Grants Las Positas College:

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Regional workforce demands

Regional Workforce Demands

Maximizing Labor Market Responsiveness


Presenters
Presenters

  • Chabot College:

    • Ron Taylor, Vice President, Academic Services

    • Tom Clark, Dean of Applied Technology and Business

    • Carolyn Arnold, Coordinator, Institutional Research & Grants

  • Las Positas College:

    • Don Milanese, Vice President, Academic Services

    • Birgitte Ryslinge, Dean of Academic Services, Vocational Education & Economic Development

    • Amber Machamer, Director of Research and Planning


Agenda
Agenda

  • Introduction

  • Profile of County Employment Demand

    and our Occupational Students

  • Community Based Demand on Educational Services and Workforce Training

    • Chabot

    • LPC

  • Apprenticeship

  • Challenges and Future Directions

  • Discussion and Questions


Sources of data on employment demand and projections
Sources of Data onEmployment Demand and Projections

  • State, Region, and Counties

    • LMI: Labor Market Information from CA EDD

    • ABAG: Association of Bay Area Governments

  • Alameda County

    • CC Benefits Strategic Planner Tool (in District)

  • Region and Local Service Area Cities

    • ABAG

    • Community Advisory Groups

    • Special Community Surveys/focus groups


Local Job Growth & DemandProjected Total Jobs 2005 to 2015

Source: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) Projections 2005


Alameda County: Selected Occupational Groups with Highest Projected Growth: 2005- 2015

Source: CC Benefits Strategic Planner Tool


Alameda County: Selected Detailed Occupations Projected Growth: 2005- 2015

requiring AA/AS degree or occupational training

with Fastest Projected Growth: 2001-2008

Source: State of California EDD Employment Projections


Occupational students at chabot and las positas how many
Occupational Students Projected Growth: 2005- 2015at Chabot and Las PositasHow many?

Source: State Chancellor’s Office MIS/VTEA Allocation Report: AY 2003-04


Occupational students at chabot and las positas who are they
Occupational Students Projected Growth: 2005- 2015at Chabot and Las PositasWho are they?

  • Similar to our other students in:

    • Educational Goal: 1/3 intend to transfer vs. 40%

    • Age: 1/2 < 25 at Chabot; 1/2 < 22 at LPC

    • Race-ethnicity: 3/4 diverse groups at CC/1/3 at LPC

    • Paid work: 3/4 work; 15% have FT jobs

    • Gender at Chabot: 1/2 women

    • Full-time college attendance at Chabot: 1/3 FT

  • Somewhat different from our other students:

    • Full-time college attendance at LPC: 44% FT

    • Gender at LPC: Only 1/3 women


Occupational programs at chabot community input
Occupational Programs at Chabot Projected Growth: 2005- 2015Community Input

  • October 2004 Focus Groups

    • 26 key community advisors

  • Selected Top Strategic Objectives

    • Strengthen existing relations … with local businesses and employers….

    • Initiate…industry-educational partnerships in response to … economic development needs.

    • Develop and enhance occupational training to meet our student’s needs.


Occupational programs at chabot community input1
Occupational Programs at Chabot Projected Growth: 2005- 2015Community Input

  • October 2004 Surveys

    • Local Rotary, Business Groups, Advisory Committees, Community Advisors

  • General praise for our occupational programs

    • “Prepares students in our area for the workforce”

    • “Provides courses geared to the job market area”

  • Praise for specific programs

    • “Great welding department”

    • “I am able to hire well-trained teachers”

    • “Chabot’s Nursing Program is essential to our operations”


Chabot college current range of programs
Chabot College Projected Growth: 2005- 2015Current Range of Programs

  • Applied Technologies

    Automotive, Drafting/Design, Electronics and Computer, Interior Design, Machine Tool, Manufacturing and Industrial, Welding.

  • Business Studies

    Accounting, Business and Commerce, Business Management, Computer Applications, International Business and Trade, Marketing, Real Estate, Retailing and Sales Accounting


Chabot college current range of programs cont
Chabot College Projected Growth: 2005- 2015Current Range of Programs (cont.)

  • Information Technologies, Media, Communications

    Journalism, Mass Communication, Applied Photography, Graphic Art and Design, Speech-Language Pathology

  • Health and Public Services

    Administration of Justice, Emergency Medical Services, Fire Technology, Health Information Technologies, Dental, Nursing, Medical Assisting, Fitness, Early Childhood Development


Chabot college new and developing programs
Chabot College Projected Growth: 2005- 2015New and Developing Programs

  • NATEF/GM ASEP Automotive Expansion

  • Online Business Management Certificate

  • Digital Media, Graphics, Photo, Music

  • ESL and Technology Students

  • Human Services

  • Hybrid Electronics/CISCO, Online/LPC

  • Nursing Partnerships, VHC, LPC


Trends in employer needs
Trends in Employer Needs Projected Growth: 2005- 2015

  • Interpersonal skills, job specific skills, problem solving skills, knowledge of business/industry and basic computer skills

  • Global competition is 2-way (goods & labor)

  • Contracted skills (multi-company or part time)

  • Bay Area (more recent immigrants, more retirees, limited high tech training needs)

  • Upgrades, workers need life-long learning


Las positas college range of workforce programs
Las Positas College Projected Growth: 2005- 2015Range of Workforce Programs

  • Applied Technology

    • Design Technology, Electronics, Laser Tech, Vacuum Tech, Industrial Tech, Welding

  • Automotive Technology

    • Automotive Electronics, Automotive Service Technician, Smog Certification, General Motors and Isuzu Regional Training Center

  • Business Studies

    • Accounting, Entrepreneurship, Management/Supervision, Marketing, exploring Micro-Business


Las positas programs cont
Las Positas Programs (cont.) Projected Growth: 2005- 2015

  • Computing Studies

    • Information Systems, Networking/Cisco, Computer Science, Application Programming, Web Programming

  • Early Childhood Development

  • Public Health and Safety

    • Administration of Justice, Fire Science, Occupational Safety and Health

  • Visual and Performing Arts

    • Interior Design, Photography, Visual Communications, Theater, Music

  • Viticulture, Enology and Horticulture


Challenges in responding to workforce needs
Challenges in Responding Projected Growth: 2005- 2015to Workforce Needs

  • Understanding and projecting employer trends: local, regional and global perspective

  • Adapting internal response systems

  • Balancing multiple missions

  • California Workforce Development System: complex and inter-related

  • High cost of some vocational programs


Challenges in responding to workforce needs cont
Challenges in Responding Projected Growth: 2005- 2015to Workforce Needs (cont.)

  • Funding and staffing complexities

  • Unique challenges in administration

  • Integration with K-12 and 4+ institutions

  • Consistent and rapid response to market changes requires a “nimble” organization


Responsive delivery mechanisms
Responsive Delivery Mechanisms Projected Growth: 2005- 2015

  • Moving beyond programs to services

  • Employer services examples

    • Interns

    • Faculty as subject matter experts

    • Recruitment and hiring: One-Stop Career Center

    • Advisory boards, curricular input

  • Flexibility in delivery mechanisms: content, time, space, place


Responsive delivery mechanisms cont
Responsive Delivery Mechanisms (cont.) Projected Growth: 2005- 2015

  • Examples of Model Customized Workforce Services:

    • Retail Management Certificate Program (Safeway & Albertsons)

    • Smog Certification

    • Nursing partnership: CC, LPC, Valley Care Health System

    • Apprenticeship


Apprenticeship programs
Apprenticeship Programs Projected Growth: 2005- 2015

  • To provide apprenticeship training for their employees, many employers partner with a Local Education Agency (LEA):

    • Community College or School District (ROP’s or Adult Education)

      • Credit (CC only) or non-credit

      • Oversight:

        • CA Department of Apprenticeship Standards

        • State Chancellor’s Office or California Department of Education


Apprenticeship programs1
Apprenticeship Programs Projected Growth: 2005- 2015

  • Employees receive on-the-job training from their employer, and employer selected “related and supplemental instruction” from the educational partner (LEA)

  • Apprentices can earn certificates or degrees

  • California: 66 trades/crafts delivered by 38 CCC campuses


Apprenticeship programs2
Apprenticeship Programs Projected Growth: 2005- 2015

  • Employer Sponsor types

    • Single employer

    • Employer associations

    • Labor/management associations

  • Funding:

    • $12,729,000 State Budget 04-05


Apprenticeship programs typical models
Apprenticeship Programs Projected Growth: 2005- 2015Typical Models

  • College delivers instruction, or

  • College or district administers and provides oversight, sponsor delivers instruction

  • Delivery of instruction funded via “RSI funding”

  • Funding split negotiated, 15% -20% for administration/oversight is typical

  • Potential FTES cooperative work experience curriculum for on-the-job training component.


Apprenticeship programs challenges
Apprenticeship Programs Projected Growth: 2005- 2015Challenges

  • State funding stream limits

    • No augmentation since 2000

    • 05-06 projects 10% shortfall for current approved apprenticeship programs

  • Timelines:

    • New program approvals 18 to 24 months

    • Program transfers (CDE to State Chancellor) can take less


College apprenticeship programs
College Apprenticeship Programs Projected Growth: 2005- 2015

  • Chabot: Automotive, Electrical, Roofers, and

    Sound & Communication

    • 300 apprentices per year, 41,800 hours of instruction

    • These hours down by 35% from three years ago

    • Engaged in early plans for assisting with new “Certification” for electricians

  • Las Positas

    • Automotive, “Isolated Apprentices”

    • Under discussion: credit program with Carpenter’s Training Committee of Northern California

      • Currently non-credit, PUSD, funded via CDE

      • Short term, possible Credit by Examination:

        • future LPC as LEA?

      • 1,500 apprentices per year, 144 hours of instruction


Workforce preparation future directions
Workforce Preparation Projected Growth: 2005- 2015Future Directions

  • Both colleges must continue to be major contributors to workforce development for our communities

  • We must coordinate, partner, and leverage relationships among all segments of the workforce delivery system

  • Delivery of workforce education must be timely, market responsive, and flexible in delivery mechanisms


Workforce preparation future directions cont
Workforce Preparation Projected Growth: 2005- 2015Future Directions (cont.)

  • Programs and services must be aligned with the state’s current and projected labor force needs: a skilled, educated workforce with relevant technical and soft skills

  • Commitment of leadership to workforce development mission, and an erasing of hard lines between “academic” and “vocational”

  • We must become ever more proactive, anticipatory and “nimble” to be leaders in workforce preparation


Community-Based Demand on Education: Projected Growth: 2005- 2015

A Living Example

  • 2005 Study: “The Changing Economic Role and Responsibilities of the Tri-Valley Region”

    • 18,000 companies created in the Tri-Valley since 1990

    • 80% have 5 or fewer employees

    • Firms with 100 or more employees have lost jobs


Community based demand on education a living example
Community-Based Demand on Education: Projected Growth: 2005- 2015A Living Example

Small firm-entrepreneurship and innovation has transformed Tri-Valley region’s economic base:

  • Four specialization areas

    • a Innovation Services: largest

    • Scientific/Biomedical Products & Services: fastest growing

    • Business Operations: large and growing

    • Information Technology Products & Services: large but contracting

  • One general support area

    • Quality of Life: Hospitality, Tourism, Viticulture


Implications for colleges
Implications for Colleges Projected Growth: 2005- 2015

  • Integrate findings in planning processes

  • Understand unique workforce education needs of 18,000 small businesses

  • Specialized curriculum, short term courses, variety of delivery mechanisms

  • Non-industry groupings: skill sets, firm size, etc

  • Exploration of partnering for Entrepreneurship/Business Development Center

  • Continue as research partner in on-going studies

  • Use new information to pursue external funding for development


Discussion and questions
Discussion Projected Growth: 2005- 2015and Questions?


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