OTHELLO

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Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes. Steps for Cassio to Restore Himself. CassioEmiliaDesdemonaOthello. . . . Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes. Steps for Cassio to Restore Himself. Exterior layers required to get to Othelloodd, considering Cassio is a lieutenantone would think Cassio could go right to Othello.

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OTHELLO

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1. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes OTHELLO Act III Notes

2. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Steps for Cassio to Restore Himself Cassio Emilia Desdemona Othello

3. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Steps for Cassio to Restore Himself Exterior layers required to get to Othello odd, considering Cassio is a lieutenant one would think Cassio could go right to Othello

4. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Emilia’s Reaction to Cassio’s Request (III.i.47-50) Tells Cassio to go directly to Othello He needs no one else Emilia is very direct Opposite of Iago

5. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes How Does Iago Persuade Othello? Iago’s Use of Rhetoric (III.iii)

6. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Iago’s Rhetoric Convinces Othello of control “My lord, you know I love you” (III.iii.117) This phrase is used more in Act III, scene iii that at any other place in the play Uses flattery to convince Othello of control (III.iii.148-151) Often elevates Othello while putting himself down

7. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Iago’s Rhetoric Impromptu/Casual Air Increases Othello’s curiosity Othello says what Iago does not Shows ownership of thoughts and therefore is more believable

8. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Iago’s Rhetoric Feigned Supplication “O, beware, my lord, of jealousy; It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock The meat it feeds on; that cuckold lives in bliss Who, certain of his fate, loves not his wronger; But, O, what damned minutes tells he o'er Who dotes, yet doubts, suspects, yet strongly loves!” (III.iii.165-170)

9. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Iago’s Rhetoric Cultural and gender assumptions (III.iii.201-204) (III.iii.227-238)

10. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Iago’s Rhetoric “Concrete” Evidence Handkerchief

11. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Iago’s Rhetoric Suggestive/Evasive Repetition Withholding information (that doesn’t exist) makes it more valuable

12. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Iago’s Rhetoric Ownership Iago allows Othello to finish Iago’s thoughts Therefore, the thoughts become Othello’s and gain more validity

13. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Iago’s Rhetoric Ownership (continued) Iago will also often interrupt Othello Iago is in complete control of the conversation If he does not like where it is going, he interrupts Othello to put him on the proper path.

14. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Iago’s Rhetoric Iago’s Ethos and Pathos Ethos The distinguishing character, sentiment, moral nature, or guiding beliefs of a person, group, or institution Pathos The emotionally moving quality or power of a literary work or of particular passages within it, appealing especially to our feelings of sorrow, pity, and compassionate sympathy (Oxford Concise Dictionary of Literary Terms)

15. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Iago’s Rhetoric Iago’s ethos and pathos as directed towards Othello: “I am honest Iago. I am just telling you what I see. If you don’t believe me, that is okay.”

16. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Why Does Iago’s Rhetoric Work? Othello’s insecurity? Othello’s ignorance? Othello’s extremism? Othello’s focus on the exterior?

17. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes The Changes in Othello Hypothetical Speculation (III.iii.260-277)

18. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes The Changes in Othello Hubris Oedipus Rex His tragic pride creates his blindness to the truth

19. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes The Changes in Othello Focus on Extremes (Pinnacles) “No; to be once in doubt Is once to be resolved” (III.iii.179-180) Once he doubts her, she is automatically guilty Absolutism

20. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes The Changes in Othello Othello’s faith in appearances is being challenged (III.iii.359-363) Requires “ocular proof” Seeing is proof for Othello Focus on the exterior

21. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes The Changes in Othello Irrational/Illogical Believes it would be better if Desdemona was intimate with his entire army as long as he did not know about it. “I had been happy, if the general camp, Pioners and all, had tasted her sweet body, So I had nothing known…” (III.iii.345-347) Focus on extremes

22. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes The Changes in Othello Importance of the Status Quo How do things look or seem? What is really going on is insignificant What appears to be going on is important Focus on the exterior

23. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes The Changes in Othello Occupational Anxiety (III.iii.347-357) Falls into a warrior pattern End of marriage is equivalent to the end of his career Does not say farewell to Desdemona Rather, says farewell to his job

24. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes The Changes in Othello Occupational Anxiety (continued) Virility Strength of a man is equivalent to his strength as a soldier How can he control an army if he cannot control his wife?

25. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes The Changes in Othello Reputation Iago stresses the importance of reputation to Othello Opposite philosophy is presented to Cassio Knowing your audience is critical Reputation=Exterior

26. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Iago and Othello’s Vow (III.iii.453-480) “I am your own forever.” Iago and Othello make a vow to each other Two men coming together to destroy a woman

27. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Ocular Proof (III.iii.383-408) Othello demands to be satisfied “make me see proof”

28. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Ocular Proof Iago’s brilliant response: How do you want it proved? Do you literally want to catch her in the act? Iago suggests it will be very difficult to catch them in the act

29. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Ocular Proof Result: Othello no longer needs “literal” ocular proof On a subconscious level, Othello did get the ocular proof when Iago placed the image in his mind Notice the use of animal imagery by Iago (lines 390-403) The desire of Cassio and Desdemona is primal and animalistic (according to Iago)

30. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Othello’s Speech Patterns By the end of Act III, scene iii, Othello no longer speaks in complete, eloquent sentences “O, blood, blood, blood!” (III.iii.451) Othello’s speech patterns become very similar to Iago’s Also, very similar to Brabantio’s “And yet, how nature erring from itself” (III.iii.227) vs. (I.iii.94-106)

31. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes The Journey of the Handkerchief Charmer Othello’s Mom Othello Desdemona Emilia Iago Cassio Bianca (prostitute)

32. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes The Handkerchief According to Snow’s essay, the handkerchief symbolizes virginity/chastity, sexuality, and Desdemona Therefore, Desdemona (or her virginity/ chastity and sexuality) has been passed around Ends up in the hands of a prostitute Courtesan—a prostitute; a mistress of a king, nobleman, etc.

33. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes The Handkerchief Earlier, Othello wants Desdemona to be “passed around” “I had been happy, if the general camp, Pioners and all, had tasted her sweet body, So I had nothing known.” (III.iii.345-347)

34. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Othello Reads Desdemona’s Palm It is moist A moist hand symbolizes a lustful nature What if it were cool? Then she is giving her “lust” to someone else

35. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Othello Reads Desdemona’s Palm Therefore, Desdemona is in a no-win situation Othello wants proof and will find it and assume its truthfulness no matter what

36. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Othello does not see Desdemona as a complete person Remember the definition of perfect He sees her as body parts (hands, lips, etc.) He runs around shouting out body parts “A liberal hand: the hearts of old gave hands; But our new heraldry is hands, not hearts.” (III.iv.46-47) “I’ll tear her to pieces!” (III.iii.431)

37. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Othello does not see Desdemona as a complete person Desdemona’s Response: Her hand is good because it gave away her heart to Othello “For ‘twas that hand that gave away my heart.” (III.iv.45) Heart and hand (interior and exterior) are connected

38. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Othello does not see Desdemona as a complete person Othello’s Response: “A liberal hand: the hearts of old gave hands; But our new heraldry is hands, not hearts.” (III.iv.46-47) Definition of who we are (heraldry—coat of arms) is hands (exterior) not hearts (interior)

39. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Othello does not see Desdemona as a complete person Othello’s Response (continued): Othello is over-determined If the handkerchief means everything, then Desdemona says she does not want it; it is too much for her (III.iv.69-77)

40. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes Othello does not see Desdemona as a complete person Othello’s Response (continued): Othello now constantly brings up spells and witchcraft Charmer and handkerchief Complete opposite of Act I In Act I, many people (especially Brabantio) accuse Othello of using spells and magic to force Desdemona to love him

41. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes The Handkerchief as a Symbol If the handkerchief symbolizes Desdemona’s sexuality or chastity, notice then the depth of Othello’s remarks: “…take heed on’t; Make it a darling like your precious eye. To lose’t or give’t away were such perdition As nothing else could match.” (III.iv.65-68)

42. Geschke/English IV AP Othello Act III Notes The Handkerchief as a Symbol “Most veritable. Therefore look to’t well.” (III.iv.76) “Is’t lost? Is’t gone? Speak, is’t out o’ th’ way?” (III.iv.80) “Fetch me the handkerchief! My mind misgives.” (III.iv.89) Misgives—feels doubt or regret

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